Families learn to eat better and move more

By Diane Palmer

Image depicts children cooking.Many families haven’t had the resources to purchase and prepare healthful foods they need. This leads to obesity and related diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.  

For 40 years, low income families have turned to Clemson’s Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) for food and nutrition education. EFNEP is offered in 26 counties and provides a series of lessons based on the USDA’s MyPyramid and Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 

“The hands-on approach helps participants make positive behavior changes in the areas of nutrition, food safety, food resource management and physical activity,” said Katherine Cason, EFNEP state coordinator.

In 2008, the program reached 789 families and 8,392 children and youth. Participants report improvement in nutrition practices, physical activity levels, food safety practices and food resource management as a result of the training.




For information: Katherine Cason, 864-723-4520, kcason@clemson.edu