Cotton Research

Assessing Natural Enemies of Stink Bugs

Parasitism of stink bug eggs and adults is of primary concern in various insecticide control systems.  This project will investigate parasitism incidence in stink bugs important in South Carolina cotton.  The effectiveness of predaceous arthropods in regulating populations of stink bugs in various insecticide control systems will also be investigated.  This project is a collaboration of Drs. Jeremy Greene (Edisto REC) and Francis Reay-Jones (Pee Dee REC).

Border Applications of Insecticide to Manage Stink Bugs in Cotton

Scientist using beat cloth in cotton.

Evaluations of in-field border sprays to mitigate whole field stink bug infestations in cotton would provide a substantial savings to producers.  This effort is collaboration between Drs. Jeremy Greene (Edisto REC) and Francis Reay-Jones (Pee Dee REC) and Dr. Michael Toews (UGA).

Development of Sensors for Detection of Insects

These projects include numerous approaches to detection of important insects with sensors and represent collaborative efforts of an entomologist (Dr. Jeremy Greene – Edisto REC), a post-doctoral research associate/biologist (Dr. David Degenhardt – Edisto REC), a graduate student (Ms. Brittany Lampson – Dept. of Ag. & Bio. Engineering, Clemson Univ.), and engineers, (Dr. Ahmad Khalilian – Edisto REC; Dr. Young Han – Dept. of Ag. & Bio. Engineering, Clemson Univ., and Will Henderson – Edisto REC).  For more information, view the project on the Precision Agriculture research page.

Evaluation of Second-Generation Bt Cottons

Because genetic modifications of cotton have created cotton plants containing genes from a common bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), that produce proteins toxic to lepidoperan pests in the crop, numerous varieties with second-generation protection are evaluated for efficacy and overall fit in South Carolina under simulated commercial production conditions.  These evaluations are conducted by Dr. Jeremy Greene – Edisto REC.

Evaluations of Seed Treatments and In-furrow Pesticides for Control of Thrips and Nematodes

Numerous trials address seed treatment (Aeris and Avicta) and in-furrow (Temik) products for control of thrips and suppression of nematodes in defined management zones.  These at-plant management systems for thrips and nematodes are compared when used alone or in combination with another system, and economic benefit or detriment will be determined for each system or combination.  These trials represent collaborative efforts of Dr. Jeremy Greene, Mr. Will Henderson, Dr. John Mueller, and Dr. Ahmad Khalilian (all Edisto REC).  Additional trials will compare the at-planting options in combination with various timings of supplemental insecticide applications for thrips.  One of these additional projects represents a multi-state effort that includes most states in the Southeast, including SC handled by Dr. Jeremy Greene, and the Midsouth and represents a large collaborative effort.  For more information, view the project on the Precision Agriculture research page.

Farmscape Ecology of Stink Bugs and the Development of Environmentally Friendly Control Strategies

The objectives of this are to study the spatial and temporal dynamics of stink bugs and their natural enemies across the farmscape and to evaluate in-field border sprays to mitigate whole field stink bug infestations in cotton.  The project will produce information that elucidates how stink bugs interact with a diverse agricultural landscape and how targeted methods for controlling stink bugs in cotton can save producers money.  This project is a collaborative effort with Drs. Jeremy Greene (Edisto REC) and Francis Reay-Jones (Pee Dee REC) and Dr. Michael Toews (UGA).

Insecticide Bioassays for Efficacy and Resistance Monitoring

The objectives of one study are to investigate tolerance/resistance development of stink bugs to commonly used insecticides using topical and Adult Vial Test (AVT) procedures and to examine the effectiveness of currently labeled insecticides and new materials on control of stink bugs in laboratory bioassays.  Data from this project will provide up-to-date information about the efficacy of new insecticides and resistance to existing insecticides used for stink bugs.  Another on-going project uses AVT techniques to detect potential development of resistance in bollworm to pyrethroid insecticides.  This multi-state effort includes most states in the Southeast, including SC handled by Dr. Jeremy Greene, and the Midsouth and represents a large collaborative effort.

Site-Specific Application of Plant Growth Regulators and Harvest Aids in Cotton

For grower and production information on cotton, visit Clemson's Cooperative Extension Service website.