Dates

September 3, 2008
August 28, 2008

August 21, 2008
August 14, 2008
August 7, 2008
July 31, 2008
July 24, 2008
July 17, 2008
July 10, 2008
July 3, 2008
June 19, 2008
June 12, 2008
June 5, 2008
May 29, 2008
May 23, 2008
May 15, 2008

Reminder

Fall Field Day
Our annual Fall Field Day will be held at the Edisto Research and Education Center near Blackville, SC, on 4 September 2007.

Registration will begin at 9:00AM.  Tours and programs will begin at 9:30AM.  Lunch will be from 12:00 to 1:15PM.

The cotton/soybean/corn program will be immediately after lunch (1:30-3:30PM).

Bollworm & Tobacco budworm

Bollworm (left) and tobacco budworm (right)

September 3, 2008

Status of Cotton Crop

As of 2 September 2008, the USDA NASS South Carolina Statistical Office had our status as improving.  Boll set is nearly complete, and adequate moisture will help fill bolls.  About 4% of the state’s cotton crop was reported to be in excellent condition.  The remainder was reported as 34% good, 43% fair, 15% poor, and 4% very poor.  These are observed/perceived state-wide averages.

Status of Soybean Crop

As of 2 September 2008, the USDA NASS South Carolina Statistical Office had our conditions for soybeans at 13% very poor, 18% poor, 37% fair, 29% good, and 3% excellent.  I am getting reports of soybean looper infestations, and I observed developing populations yesterday (numerous small loopers).  Overall, conditions have improved.  Stink bugs and defoliators, such as loopers and velvetbean caterpillars should be monitored. 

News from Above the Lakes

No news to report this week.  This is your turn for input – please email your comments/observations to me.

News from Below the Lakes

A couple of local consultants reported to me today that they are still looking at some late cotton for stink bugs, but most fields are finished concerning insect management.

Stink Bugs

This the final word on stink bugs.  They continue to build up populations in cotton and soybeans and should be monitored in late cotton for another week or so.  Soybeans should be monitored for stink bugs up to and into R7.  If you are under threshold (1 bug per row foot) at R7, you should be OK.

Tobacco Budworm & Bollworm

Captures of adult tobacco budworm (TBW) and bollworm (BW) in pheromone traps at EREC this season and last season are pictured below.  The scales on the 2008 and 2007 charts are the same to illustrate where we are compared with last year.  We observed slightly increased captures of bollworm moths and reduced numbers of tobacco budworm this past week.  We will continue to monitor bollworm and tobacco budworm moth captures in these traps until October, and I will report those final data in next year’s newsletter. 
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August 28, 2008

Status of Cotton Crop

As of 24 August 2008, the USDA NASS South Carolina Statistical Office had our progress at about 3% of bolls open, with our 5-yr average of 11% open at this point.  About 2% of the state’s cotton crop was reported to be in excellent condition.  The remainder was reported as 30% good, 46% fair, 13% poor, and 9% very poor.  These are observed/perceived state-wide averages.

Status of Soybean Crop

As of 25 August 2008, the USDA NASS South Carolina Statistical Office had our conditions for soybeans at 14% very poor, 24% poor, 37% fair, 24% good, and 1% excellent.  My plots of untreated early-maturing(MGIV) soybean are covered with stink bugs.  As the beans mature, they are completely loaded with stink bugs, mostly green stink bugs.  It seems like something prevented southern green stink bugs from reaching their full potential, so large populations of stink bugs have been late to develop.  However, we have plenty of later-maturing beans that will be the target of stink bugs, so watch your later beans.  Migrating defoliators, such as soybean looper (SBL) and velvetbean caterpillar (VBC), are starting to show up in areas. 

If I were going to treat for SBL (no problems with stink bugs, etc.), I would use Intrepid 2F at 4-8 oz per acre.  Severe infestationswill require the higher rates, but 5 oz usually does the job.  If stink bugs are a problem as well, a tank-mix of Intrepid plus a labeled pyrethroid would be a good treatment.  If VBC are a problem, a pyrethroid is the way to go.

News from Above the Lakes

No news to report this week.  This is your turn for input – please email your comments/observations to me.

News from Below the Lakes

A local consultant reported to me yesterday that he is finding fall armyworms in multiple fields.  Another local consultant is calling it quits this week on his fields, except for some late-planted Bollgard cotton.  He will keep checking this Bollgard cotton for another week or two.

Fall Armyworms

Stink bugs and fall armyworms (FAW) are about the last foes to face in cotton right now.  As you know, it is particularly challenging to address problems with FAW in cotton.  I have colleagues here in the Southeast that support novaluron (Diamond 0.83 EC) as the “go-to” product for control of FAW.  The 9-oz rate is recommended as a stand-alone rate.  We generated some data last year (FAW data are difficult to obtain) that indicated that 9 oz of Diamond per acre tank-mixed with a pyrethroid did a fine job.  Thresholds for FAW are 10 or more per 100 plants, checking blooms and bolls for presence of the caterpillars.  Stay after FAW, as they can damage larger bolls than bollworms can injure.

Stink Bugs, Boll Injury, and Weather Interactions, Oh My!

Boll injury from stink bugs will undoubtedly be magnified by the recent wet weather.  Micro-organisms thrive in moist conditions, so it makes perfect sense that we see pronounced feeding injury from bugs when rain events are frequent near the end of the season when we have the heaviest pressure from stink bugs.  The micro-organisms that cause boll rot and are associated with bugs that feed on bolls are promoted during wet times.  So, if you have fields that are still going, be particularly aware of potential damage from stink bugs, especially if it keeps raining.  I firmly believe that boll injury from bugs is very different under dry versus wet conditions.

Tobacco Budworm & Bollworm

Captures of adult tobacco budworm (TBW) and bollworm (BW) in pheromone traps at EREC this season and last season are pictured below.  The scales on the 2008 and 2007 charts are the same to illustrate where we are compared with last year.  We observed decreased captures of bollworm moths and consistent low numbers of tobacco budworm this past week.
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