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Eclipse


A dummy photo of the countdown to the eclipse.


HOSTED AND SPONSORED BY THE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

CLICK HERE FOR PRINTABLE ECLIPSE PROGRAM GUIDE AND MAP


Clemson University is South Carolina's only top 25-ranked public research university in the path of totality for the 2017 solar eclipse, presenting a rare opportunity to share this extraordinary scientific event with the public at large. Clemson is making its scientists, experts and main college campus — which will experience a total solar eclipse at 2:37 p.m. Monday, August 21 — available to the public and the working press leading up to and on the day of the astronomical event. Connect with Clemson to see how you can share this once-in-a-lifetime experience with us!

WHAT TO EXPECT
It is likely there will be heavy traffic on major and minor roadways, so keep your vehicles gassed up. It will be hot, so please bring water and stay hydrated. Water also will be available for purchase at the event. Parking lots will fill up. Buses will be running, but walking to our main venue is the preferred option, so wear comfortable shoes. Expect cellular and wireless networks to be strained, making it difficult to complete calls or check emails. Please bring cash for vendor purchases.




SKYWATCHERS

Students, educators, and community members of all ages are invited to join Clemson’s College of Science in experiencing the eclipse on our campus. We’ve assembled the resources to improve understanding and awareness about the total solar eclipse. Our on-campus planetarium is also open to the public by appointment. We can’t wait to get together as a community to witness science and history unfold.

Additional Resources

MEDIA

As a national research university, Clemson University is committed to sharing its cutting-edge research and information about the eclipse with members of the working press. Our scientists and experts are available to the media leading up to and on the day of the eclipse. For interview requests and technical support, see below.

Additional Resources

VIEWING DISCLAIMER

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR “ECLIPSE OVER CLEMSON” EVENT:  ALWAYS FOLLOW SAFE SOLAR VIEWING PROCEDURES. LOOKING DIRECTLY AT THE SUN DURING A SOLAR ECLIPSE WITHOUT SPECIAL PURPOSE PROTECTIVE SOLAR FILTER GLASSES (“ECLIPSE GLASSES”) CAN RESULT IN SERIOUS EYE INJURY INCLUDING BLINDNESS. NASA (the National Aeronautics and Space Administration) recommends only using eclipse glasses that meet the following criteria:

    • Have certification information with a designated ISO 12312-2 international standard, and have the manufacturer’s name and address printed on the product.
    • DO NOT use if they are older than three years, or have scratched or wrinkled lenses.
    • DO NOT use homemade filters.
    • DO NOT use ordinary sunglasses — even very dark ones.
    • DO NOT look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device.

TOTALITY: The only time you do not need to wear the eclipse glasses when viewing the sun is the brief period when the moon completely covers the bright parts of the sun, known as totality. On the main campus in Clemson, SC, totality lasts from 2:37:11 to 2:39:46 p.m. EDT. If you can see any part of the sun through the eclipse glasses, it is not safe to take them off. IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO DETERMINE WHEN IT IS SAFE TO REMOVE ECLIPSE GLASSES GIVEN YOUR VIEWING LOCATION. Clemson University assumes no responsibility for any people causing harm to themselves or others by following unsafe solar-viewing procedures. By participating in the event “ECLIPSE OVER CLEMSON” and in the viewing of the solar eclipse, you assume the risk of any possible injury, and you agree to hold Clemson University harmless for any harm caused by following unsafe solar viewing procedures. You are responsible for making sure you and, if applicable, your minor children follow safe solar viewing procedures. For more information and recommendations from NASA visit https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety.

Eclipse filter glasses might not securely fit small children, in which case they should not be used. Small observers can follow the progress of the eclipse by looking at images of the sun produced by pinhole and other projectors that will be on site at Clemson, as well as on sidewalks under trees, which they can be encouraged to seek out.