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  • All seminars are from 2:30- 4:00pm on Fridays in G-033 Jordan unless otherwise noted.
  • For questions and comments, please contact Dr. Charlie Wei.
 

Jan. 24, 2014

 2:30pm

 G-033 Jordan

A Multi-Function Enzyme for the Repair of DNA Deamination

Dr. Weigo Cao, Department of Genetics and Biochemistry  Clemson University 

View abstract. 

Hosted by: Dr. Charlie Wei  


Jan. 31, 2014

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Synthetic Biology

Clemson University iGEM Team

Synthetic Biology is a new engineering discipline studying principles and techniques for the design of devices made of biological materials (DNA, proteins, cells, etc.). The International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition is a premiere undergraduate Synthetic Biology competition. Student teams are given a kit of biological parts (BioBricks) from the Registry of Standard Biological Parts and use these parts and new parts of their own design to build biological systems with novel functions.  Members of the Clemson iGEM Team will discuss synthetic biology, the iGEM competition, the Clemson iGEM Team, various international iGEM projects, and ways you can participate and join the iGEM community. The overall goal of the Clemson iGEM team project is to develop a universal self-amplifying (USA) biosensor system for rapid one-step detection of specific microbial pathogens in low limit. Due to the scope of this project, the work will be conducted by three collaborative Creative Inquiry iGEM teams.

View abstract.

Hosted by Dr. Jeremy Tzeng


Feb. 7, 2014

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Plays an Unorthodox Role to Promote DNA Replication in Terminally Differentiating Cells

Dr. Lizhao Wu, Rutgers, New Jersey Medical School 

View Abstract.

Hosted by Dr. Charlie Wei  


Feb. 13, 2014

7:30pm

100 Holtzendorf

*Note: Due to increment weather, this week's seminar has been cancelled.
Special Darwin Week Invited Speaker

"Genetic and Demographic Management of Endangered Species' Captive Breeding Programs"

Dr. John Ballou, Population Manager and Research Scientist at the Smithsonian Institution's Conservation Biology Institute in Washington, DC.

Evening seminar (*7:30 pm, 100 Holtzendorf)

Dr. Jon Ballou

Hosted by Dr. Margaret Ptacek


Feb. 18, 2014

3:30pm

100 Holtzendorf

Generating Genomic Diversity in an Opportunistic Fungal Pathogen


Dr. Maleah Hickman, Univeristy of Minnesota

3:30 – 4:30 PM

Hosted by Dr. William Baldwin

*Refreshments will be served following the seminar


Feb. 28, 2014

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

University Calendar Listing

 

Ecological and Evolutionary Physiology of Salamanders at the Individual, Population, and Species Levels

Organisms interact with, and respond to, the   environmentthrough physiological changes.   Therefore, spatial and temporal variation in   environmental conditions often generates variation in organismal physiology that influences the distributions and abundances of species. In my laboratory we study how environmental   heterogeneity influences patterns of physiological   differentiation and how variation in physiology (or lack thereof) influences local and broad-scale   ecological phenomena. I will discuss some recent   and ongoing work examining physiological variation among individuals and species. Specifically, I will focus on how we have used this variation to understand the ecological and physiological factors governing salamander range limits and how interspecific variation in thermal physiology might help to explain broad-scale patterns of salamander species distributions.
More Information about Dr. Gifford, University of Arkansas. 

Hosted by Vanessa Young & the Dr. Blob lab.    

 

March 7, 2014

3:30pm

G-033 Jordan

University Calendar Listing

Describing and Predicting Host-Pathogen Interactions with Salmonella enterica Typhimurium in a Natural Host Model of Infection

*Special Event time of 3:30pm.

Dr. Richard Laughlin, Texas A&M

Hosted by Rhonda Powell

 

March 21, 2014

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Spring Break - No Seminar

 

March 28, 2014

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia) Ripens to a Superfruit

Muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia) is a regional grape species native to the  southeastern USA. In addition to its special aroma and taste, the fruit is gaining reputation for its health benefits from its inherent bioactive phytochemicals, which labels muscadine as a new   “superfruit”. This presentation will introduce the muscadine aromas   and phytochemicals, as well as its health benefits. 

Visit Dr. Cheng's Profile. 

Dr. Feng Chen, Clemson University 

Hosted by Dr. Charlie Wei  

 
 

April 4, 2014

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

University Calendar Listing

"Linking Behavior, Life History and Food Supply with the Population Dynamics of White-Footed Mice: Forty Years in the Woods"

I will review and integrate key aspects of behavioral and life history traits, food supply and population dynamics of the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), a rodent species that is abundant and widely distributed across much of eastern North America. Results are based largely on a 40-year mark-and-recapture study in a forest fragment in northwest Ohio, USA. Behavioral plasticity in such reproductive traits as mating system and parental care allows this species to adjust quickly to changing environments. The species has a relatively “fast” life history, with rapid attainment of sexual maturity and high fecundity in the face of high mortality rates. Maximal reproductive effort early in life enables a rapid population response. Food supply, largely in the form of hickory mast, determines the size of the reproducing population in early spring, which, in turn, influences the size of the late summer peak population. The peak population size is also affected by short-term weather events possibly acting via the food supply. The effects of weather and food on population growth are in part mediated through competition, including defense of space and suppression of reproduction. The inelasticity of female territories appears to set an upper limit to population density.

 Dr. Steve Vessey
Professor emeritus
Bowling Green State University

Hosted by John Cummings

April 18, 2014

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

"Carbon Cycle Processes and Microbial Diversity in Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecosystems: from Genomes to Biomes"

The most important problem in environmental science is the rise of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere caused by the burning of fossil fuels and other human activities. This seminar will present arguments that microbes are essential in understanding the impact of rising greenhouse gases on the biosphere. It will then move into discussing the roles of bacteria and other microbes in the natural carbon cycle of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. These roles are now being examined by genomic techniques and other cultivation-independent approaches that explore functions of specific microbial groups in complex, natural communities. The seminar will end with recent work on the function (activity) of one microbial group, aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in the Delaware estuary. The goal of the seminar is to illustrate the importance of bacteria and other microbes in natural environments and to convey the excitement of modern microbial ecology.

Dr. David Kirchman
Maxwell P. and Mildred H. Harrington
Professor
School of Marine Science and Policy
University of Delaware

Hosted by Barbara Campbell