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  • All seminars are from 2:30- 4:00pm on Fridays in G-033 Jordan unless otherwise noted.
  • For questions and comments, please contact Dr. Feliciano.

Seminar Archives - Coming Soon


ENTOX Seminar Listings

 

Feb. 6

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

"Of fins and fingers: New data on the ancient gene regulatory mechanisms that pattern vertebrate appendages"

Dr. Marcus Davis 

Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Kennesaw  State University

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Hosted by: Dr. Mike Sears  


Feb. 13

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

"Understanding the Drivers of

Community Structure Across Scales"

Dr. Dan McGlinn

Utah State University

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Hosted by: Dr. Sears


Feb. 20

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

 

"Microbial Fe(III) Reduction and Military
Explosives: How Biology and Chemistry Work
Together for Groundwater Remediation"

Dr. Kevin Finneran

Dept. of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences,
Clemson University

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Hosted by: Dr. Barbara Campbell  


Feb. 27

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Metabolic Regulation of the Blood Brain Barrier

Dr. Debra Mays, Wright State University

"My research focuses upon mechanisms controlling neurodegeneration and cancer. I have found that changes in oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the brain, cause non-cell autonomous effects upon the surrounding neurons, astrocytes, and vasculature within the nervous system—causing the manifestation of neuropsychiatric behaviors and changes in the blood brain barrier. Because both cellular and behavioral phenotypes could be reversed with the administration of an antioxidant, my goal is to define the role of metabolism dysfunction in neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric diseases as well as explore the roles of oxidants/antioxidants in cancer development and progression."

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Hosted by: Dr. Feliciano 


March 6

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Adaptation to climate and climate change in insects

Dr. Joel Kingsolver, University of North Carolina

Animals adapt to local climatic conditions through a variety of physiological, morphological and behavioral traits.  Insects have distinct life stages that inhabit different microclimates, and that differ in their capacities for movement and behavior. How will these differences in trait types and life stages influence the ecological and evolutionary responses of insects to recent and future climate changes?  For example, which types of traits and which life stages are more likely to adapt to climate change?  Do phenotypic plasticity and thermoregulatory behavior accelerate or retard evolutionary responses to climate change? I will describe laboratory, field, historical and modeling studies of Colias butterflies that explore some of these questions. 

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Hosted by: BioSci Graduate Student Association


March 13

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Dr. Erhard Bieberich, UGA

More information coming soon.

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Hosted by:


March 27th

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

 On the Value of Taking a Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Marine Disease: the Intriguing Case of the Lobster Virus PaV1

Dr. Don Behringer, University of Florida

The impact of pathogens on marine ecosystems is without question. In fact, through loss of habitat structure or through cascading community effects, pathogens have changed the very nature of the marine environment. In spite of this, studies of marine pathogens have lagged behind their terrestrial counterparts, especially with regards to multidisciplinary scope.

However, the tide is turning and studies are emerging that integrate across disciplines. The Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus is afflicted across much of its range by the pathogenic virus PaV1 (Panulirus argus Virus 1). Components of our work on PaV1 include the ecological effects of disease, geographic disease distribution and connectivity, disease pathobiology, molecular characterization of the pathogen, and fishery implications. Here I will show how we have advanced from basic epidemiological studies to recent work focused on the P. argus-PaV1 pathosystem as a model to improve our understanding of how infectious agents are dispersed and maintained among distant marine populations.

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Hosted by: Dr. Baeza

 
 

April 3

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of cerebral cortical
development and evolution

Dr. Ken Kwan, University of Michigan

Evolution of the cerebral cortex is thought to underlie our species’ most remarkable cognitive, perceptive, and motor capabilities, the execution of
which depends on the precise establishment of axonal connectivity during development. Miswiring of cortical circuitry can lead to disorders, including
autism and schizophrenia, that affect the most distinctly human cognitive functions.

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Hosted by: Dr. Feliciano

 
 

April 10

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Genetical genomics in salamanders & invasive lizards in Florida: a tale of two projects 

Dr. Robert Page

Assistant Professor,
College of St. Benedict and St. John's university

The Page Lab, located in the joint Biology Department of the College of St. Benedict & St. John's University, focuses on student-oriented research in evolutionary and ecological genetics and genomics. Salamanders are the most common study organism; however, the lab is also currently involved in collaborative projects on a variety of animal taxa ranging from spiders to mice.
Questions in the Page Lab are frequently addressed using population genetic, comparative & functional genomic, and statistical bioinformatic approaches.

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Hosted by: Dr. Baeza

 
 

April 17

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

 

Dr. Alison Buchan, UTK

More information coming soon.

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Hosted by: Dr. Barbara Campbell