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  • All seminars are from 2:30- 4:00pm on Fridays in G-033 Jordan unless otherwise noted.
  • For questions and comments, please contact Dr. Feliciano.
 

Sept. 5

 2:30pm

 G-033 Jordan

"Genetic & Demographic Management of of Endangered Species' Captive Breeding Programs"

Dr. Jon Ballou, Smithsonian Institute
 



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Hosted by: Dr. Rapaport & Dr. Ptacek


Sept. 12

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

"Understanding the role of histone deacetylase-4 (hdac4) in zebrafish craniofacial development"

Dr. April DeLaurier, University of Aiken




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Hosted by: Dr. Chapman


Sept. 19

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Amphibian & Reptilian Population, Community, and Ecosystems as Affected by Emerging Infectious Disease and Global Change

Dr. Karen Lips, University of Maryland



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Hosted by BioSci Graduate Students


Sept. 26

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Molecular Analysis of Neuronal Migration and Layer Formation in Cerebral Cortex

Dr. Eva Anton, UNC Chapel Hill

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Hosted by: Dr. Feliciano


Oct. 3

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Molecular Mechanisms of Microbial Pathogens

Dr. Paul Hoffman, School of Medicine - University of Virginia

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Hosted by: Dr. McNealy


Oct. 10

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

 

TBD

Dr. Mike Sears, Clemson University

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Hosted by:

 

Oct. 17

3:30pm

G-033 Jordan

TBD

Dr. Barbara Campbell, Clemson University

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Oct. 24

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Tissue Development and Regeneration

Dr. Valerie Horsley, Yale University

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Hosted by: Dr. Feliciano

 

Nov. 7

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Environmental Microbiology and Genomics

Dr. Kostas Konstantinidis,

School of Civil and Environmental Engineering - Georgia Tech

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Hosted by: Dr. Campbell

 

Nov. 14

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Hormonal Pleiotropy & the Evolution of Body Size

Dr. Henry John-Alder

In the words of the great 20th-century ecological physiologist, George Bartholomew, “it is only a slight overestimate to say that the most important attribute of  an animal is its size.” Body size constrains life history   and fitness and is strongly subject to selection. Thus, the widespread occurrence of male-larger and female-larger sexual size dimorphism, where adults of one sex are characteristically larger than the other, suggests that   body size has commonly evolved to different sex-specific optima, and focuses interest on how and why sex differences in body size develop. My collaborators and I have contributed a growing body of evidence that the development of SSD can be caused by sex differences in the growth-regulatory roles of gonadal steroids.  In Sceloporus lizards, for example, the development of SSD occurs at about the same time that plasma testosterone diverges between males and females.  Experimental studies indicate that testosterone inhibits growth in males of species in which females grow faster to become larger than males.  In contrast, testosterone stimulates growth in males of species in which males grow faster to become larger than females.  Thus, species differences in the growth-regulatory effect of testosterone align well with natural patterns of SSD in Sceloporus and related Iguanian lizards.  In several species of Gekkotans, however, testosterone appears to have a much more limited role in growth regulation, with ovarian steroids having the more important role in growth regulation leading to SSD.  Interestingly, diversification of Iguanians and Gekkotans reflects the most basal evolutionary split of all squamate lineages.  Our most recent work suggests that the effects of testosterone on organismal growth are mirrored in its effects at the molecular level on the activity of the central growth-regulatory endocrine axis: in a female-larger species, testosterone inhibits growth and inhibits the expression of endocrine IGF-1, while just the opposite occurs in a male-larger species.  We are anxiously awaiting a more comprehensive, comparative analysis of the effects of testosterone on the transcriptome."

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April 18, 2014

2:30pm

G-033 Jordan

Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms that Underlie the Development and Function of the Cerebral Cortext

Dr. Matthew Sarkisian, University of Florida

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Hosted by: Dr. Feliciano