Vegetation Management and Weed Control in Specialty Turf Areas

Bert McCarty

Specialty turf areas include roadsides, industrial sites, fields, and common areas.

Table 1.  Vegetation Management and Weed Control in Specialty Turf Areas such as Roadsides, Industrial Sites, Fields, and Common Areas.

NOTE:  In portions of the United States, numerous weed species have developed resistance to members of the sulfonylurea herbicide family (e.g. Telar, Oust, and Escort).  Roadside managers are encouraged to follow these weed control practices to prevent sulfonylurea resistant weeds:

  1. Tank-mix sulfonylurea herbicides with herbicides that have a different mode-of-action (e.g. RoundUp, 2,4-D, etc.).
  2. Do not let weed escapes go to seed in areas treated with sulfonylurea herbicide.
  3. Respray problem areas with herbicide that has a different mode-of-action than sulfonylurea.
  4. Rotate the use of sulfonylurea herbicides with herbicides that have a different mode-of-action.
  • Note:  Imidazolinone herbicides have the same mode-of-action as sulfonylureas.

Spray equipment must be properly calibrated.  A digital speed monitoring device helps maintain the correct ground speed of an application vehicle instead of relying on its stock speedometer.  Spray pattern width should be continually monitored throughout the application.  Spray pattern bending (distortion) because of excessive ground speeds or wind willl shorten spray widths and cause over-application.  Always use drift control as recommended by each herbide label.

Most herbicides should not be treated to drought stressed turf.  Excessive turf damage and reduced weed control often results.

Table 2.  Spray Additives (23 KB, PDF)

Table 3.  Guide to Woody Plant Response to Herbicides (42 KB, PDF)

Woody dogwood plant