What is a donut peach? Can you tell me something about it?

Answer: A donut peach is a natural genetic mutation where the shape of the fruit is naturally flat (donut shaped) rather than globose (spherical or round).  They may have yellow flesh or white flesh.  The flesh texture may be melting or nonmelting. The pit inside the donut peach also has a different shape than a traditional peach pit.  In the donut peach, the pit is nearly spherical.  In China, where the donut peach originates, the name is pan tao where pan means flat and tao means peach.  Some people also refer to them as peento. 

Galaxy, a white-fleshed donut peach on the tree just before harvest

This is Galaxy, a white-fleshed donut peach on the tree just before harvest.

This is a clingstone, melting, subacid, white-fleshed donut peach

This is a clingstone, melting, subacid, white-fleshed donut peach (USDA-ARS, Parlier, CA).  It has a sweet, mild flavor.

 This is a semiclingstone, melting, yellow-fleshed donut peach

This is a semiclingstone, melting, yellow-fleshed donut peach (Plant Patent #19273, Rutgers Univ., NJ). It has a sweet, mild flavor.

This is a clingstone, nonmelting, yellow-fleshed and yellow-skinned donut peach

This is a clingstone, nonmelting, yellow-fleshed and yellow-skinned donut peach (Plant Patent #18997, Rutgers Univ., NJ). It is marketed with the name "TangOs" because of its supposed sweet, spicy flavor.

Donut peaches often have a very short peduncle (stem)

Donut peaches often have a very short peduncle (stem) and if you are not careful in picking them, the skin may tear at the point where the fruit attaches to the stem.  Also, some cultivars have a tendency to crack on the tip end of the fruit.  This provides entry for brown rot spores and subsequent infection/rot.  Both of these traits are undesirable.

This is a donut peach with a split pit

Notice that you can see entirely through this donut peach with a split pit. This trait is undesirable and would make the fruit unmarketable.

 

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