Peach Picks for South Carolina #7 Caroking

 

Intro blooper... Alright, whenever you're ready...  O.K., ... Hey, I'm Desmond Layne, peace..., peace, peace Brother, laughing, ... alright, ...

Hey, I'm Desmond Layne, Peach Specialist at Clemson University.  Welcome to the Clemson Tiger Peach Network.

Today is July 1, 2011 and this is our second season of "Everything About Peaches". This summer our series is called "Peach Picks for South Carolina". Every week throughout the entire growing season we are featuring those cultivars that perform the very best here in "The Tastier Peach" state.

We are here at my variety test block at James Cooley's Farm in Chesnee, SC.  Last time, we featured a white-fleshed, subacid peach called Snowbrite.

This time, we're featuring a more traditional, Southern peach called Caroking!  Caroking was developed at Clemson University. It was released to the public in 2005.  Because it is not patented, it can be freely propagated. It typically ripens towards the end of June, about the time of Redhaven, depending on where you are located in the state.

In our Clemson University research trials over the last 5 years, the performance of Caroking has been very good.  Caroking has good size averaging from 2 to 3 inches in diameter.  It has a very nice uniform, round shape and an excellent red overcolor (or blush). When you cut through the skin into the flesh you can see that it has yellow flesh.  It is a melting flesh type and it is also freestone.  Like Redhaven, it's very well suited certainly for fresh eating, but also for making into ice cream, cobbler, smoothies, ... pretty much anything you want!  Its' got that typical tanginess that comes from peaches with normal acidity that we associate with a Southern peach.

Last time, Snowbrite was a delicious eating experience, but let's see what Caroking tastes like...   "Mmmm. Now that is pure delight!"  Typical, tangy, sweet, juicy, fabulous flavor, Southern-style peach.  That's what you're looking for!  

Why don't you join us next week when we'll feature another "Peach Pick for South Carolina"?  You know, being a peach specialist you have to juggle all kinds of responsibilities.  It's a tough job ... somebody's got to do it.

For more educational videos and information about peaches, you should visit my "Everything About Peaches" website at www.clemson.edu/peach.  And if you would like to read my columns for the American Fruit Grower magazine, you can go to their website at www.growingproduce.com.