Programs and Events

  • Multicultural program participants at Clemson University, Clemson SC
  • Multicultural program participants at Clemson University, Clemson SC
  • Multicultural program participants at Clemson University, Clemson SC
  • Multicultural program participants at Clemson University, Clemson SC
  • Multicultural program participants at Clemson University, Clemson SC

In collaboration with members of the campus and greater Clemson communities, the Gantt Center offers co-curricular programs that build a complex understanding of diversity and social justice, while promoting the richness of diversity and inclusion. It allows for participants to explore multiple ways of knowing and unpack differences.

  • Grill & Greet

    Grill & Greet is an event that aims to support the social integration and continuation of students into the Clemson and Gantt communities. Grill & Greet is one of our longest standing cultural events; however, in 2007, the inclusion of student tabling and performances took this program to new heights. Currently, numerous multicultural student organizations (including culturally-based fraternities and sororities) host tables to provide individuals the opportunity to learn about campus involvement and peer engagement. There will be free food and beverages, live music, and entertainment!

    Grill & Greet

    Thursday, August 20, 2020
    6-8 p.m.
    North Green and Outdoor Amphitheatre
    Rain location: Hendrix Student Center Ballrooms

    For organizations that are interested in performing or tabling at the event, please check back for the sign-up form in April 2020.

  • Power of Perspective Panel Series

    The Gantt Multicultural Center has partnered with the Department of Campus Achievement and Student Empowerment to create a multi-part series that will aim to explore systemic oppression and subsequent inequities in our nation’s history. These sessions will tap into the knowledge and expertise of Clemson faculty members, exploring topics like education, policy, history, and law. Come to learn from the panelists' insights, ask questions, and glean lessons for action in addressing structural oppression.

    The next Power of Perspectives panel will be held on Thursday, November 19 from noon to 1:30pm and cover the topic of interfaith foundations in the US. More information will be shared soon.

    Access the recording of the panel from July 9th, Independence Day: Land of the Free? here.

    Access the recording of the panel from July 30, Matter of Policy: Who has Influence? here.

    Access the recording of the panel from August 27, Education: The Great Equalizer? here.

    Access the recording of the panel from October 8, Redefining Rural America: What Stories are Hidden? here.

    The recording of the panel from October 27, Electoral College and the Supreme Court: Shapers of a Nation? will be loaded soon.

    Contact Dr. Kendra Stewart-Tillman (stewar5@clemson.edu) or DeOnte Brown at (deonteb@clemson.edu) for more information.

  • Indigenous People’s Day

    Over the past several years, researchers on Clemson’s campus have committed to identifying and uncovering the history of colonization and slavery directly connected to this campus. In an effort to honor tribal communities that inhabited this land, we recognize Indigenous People’s Day to decolonize the historical narratives, while building awareness about the importance of preserving Native American languages, culture, traditions, and identity.

    Indigenous People's Day

    Supporting Native Students: Building Relationships with Native Nations

    October 12, 2020 from 12:30PM – 1:30PM via Zoom

    Register here: http://bit.ly/IndigenousClemson

    Join for this virtual workshop experience! The current Tribal Liaison for the University of Wisconsin System, Dr. Pyawasay-Jennings, will offer insight on how universities can utilize policy to work with Native Nations to build institutional infrastructure to support Native students and create meaningful relationships with Native communities. 

    Dr. Pyawasay-Jennings joins us, again, for our annual Indigenous Peoples Day celebration. Dr. Pyawasay-Jennings lives on the Bad River Reservation in Wisconsin, with her husband and two girls. She is an enrolled member of the Menominee Nation of Wisconsin and currently serves as the Tribal Liaison for the University of Wisconsin System and earned her Ph.D. in Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development from the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota, and both her M.S. in Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis and B.A. in Sociology/American Indian Studies from University of Wisconsin-Madison. As an educator and scholar-activist, her passion is to transform educational spaces to create a more just institution.

    Sponsored by the Gantt Multicultural Center. Contact Jerad Green at jeradg@clemson.edu for more information or accessibility needs.

    Learn more in the Newstand article

  • Native American Heritage Month

    Elaine Eisenbraun, Juanita Wilson, and Barbara McRae: Learning about and Learning from the Nikwasi Initiative

    Thursday, November 5, 2020

    7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

    Zoom Link: https://clemson.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_omh5SCt1Qbu_BG21TvjMUQ

    Engage with Elaine Eisenbraun, Juanita Wilson, and Barbara McRae as they present their work regarding the Nikwasi Initiative. A bridge building project, the Nikwasi Initiative works with communities to recognize, preserve, and interpret the culture and heritage of people and places on the landscape that was traditionally the Cherokee homeland.

    Advancing Indigeneity on Campus

    Monday, November 9, 2020 

    2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

    Register through Tiger Training https://clemson.bridgeapp.com/

    We acknowledge that the main campus of Clemson University occupies the traditional and ancestral land of the Cherokee People. Clemson’s main campus is built on land seized through US military and diplomatic incursions culminating in the Treaty of Dewitt’s Corner in 1777. This is also land on which people enslaved by the Pickens, Clemson, and Calhoun families lived and worked, and that was transformed into the campus of Clemson University through convict labor.

    This workshop has been designed to (a) share the histories of Indigenous groups on this land, (b) engage participants in a critical dialogue about contemporary indigeneity, and (c) share information with participants about current efforts to enhance Indigeneity on Clemson’s campus through the Indigenizing Clemson committee. *This workshop is part of the Strategic Exclusive Excellence Certificate program.

    Hidden Here in Plain Sight: Cherokee Persons, Land, and Clay

    Coordinated by Dr. Andrea Feeser and Planned Parenthood Generation Action (PPGA)

    Wednesday, November 11, 2020

    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM 

    RSVP Link: https://clemson.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwrfuqurj0oGtS0bI9LZ8uXnCR7j8tJEiPt

    Engage with Dr. Andrea Feeser as she presents a history of interlocked events that involved porcelain, an eighteenth-century battle and treaty that took place at the Cherokee town Isunigu upon which Clemson is built, and Cherokee persons likely enslaved.

    Rethinking Religion in Native American Contexts: An Exploration of the Limits of Comparison in 17th-Century New France

    Coordinated by Dr. James Jeffries and Planned Parenthood Generation Action (PPGA)

    Thursday, November 12, 2020

    7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

    RSVP Link: https://clemson.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0oduCqqzwqHtULWi6KEQroDwY46QrBbUK8 

    Engage with Dr. James Jeffries as he presents his research of French accounts of Native Americans in 17th-c. French Canada, which repeatedly described the indigenous peoples as utterly devoid of religion.  Dr. Jeffries will contend that this failure of religious comparison persists in current scholarly publications in ethnohistory and religious studies, which claim the inverse: that religion was all-pervasive in the lives of Native Americans.  Rather than correcting the earlier claims of an absence of religion, Dr. Jeffries will argue that such scholarship unwittingly imposes a comparative framework that originated among Christian theologians who, writing in the same century as the French newcomers to North America, defined religion from patterns of belief and practice rooted in (the birth and dissemination of) monotheism.

    Artist Presentation: Esteban Cabeza de Baca

    Thursday, November 19, 2020 

    7:00 PM-8:00 PM

    RSVP Link: https://clemson.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIrduipqTgvGtX-KpcT-tYsFg5khH96jLNU

    Engage in our artist presentation featuring Esteban Cabeza de Baca. Cabeza de Baca’s hybrid techniques and influences form a complex braid that interrogates the dialectical relationships between colonialism and its critique, between cultural extraction and its inversion.

    Cherokee History and Stories: Freeman Owle

    Friday, November 20, 2020

    7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

    Zoom Link: https://clemson.zoom.us/j/91703943939  

    Join us for our storytelling event featuring Freeman Owle! In addition to storytelling, Freeman Owle carves wood and stone, and speaks about Cherokee and history.

  • Women's Celebration Month

    WCM-Logo.jpg

    Women's Celebration Month serves as a dedicated time to highlight the experiences, contributions, and accomplishments of women at Clemson and beyond. The month of March offers an opportunity to delve into challenges around gender while looking to strategies for action and inclusion. The month's events offer opportunities for connections in solidarity, awareness-building education, and uplifting celebration.

    *Please check back in October for committee sign-ups and in February 2021 for a complete list of events.
  • Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

    Initially founded in 1977, Asian Pacific American Heritage Month (APAHM) honors and recognizes Asian Pacific Islander Desi American (APIDA) people in the United States and their contributions that enhance and enrich U.S. American history. While the heritage month is nationally recognized during the month of May, Clemson celebrates APAHM during the month of April.

    Call for 2021 APAHM Committee Members

    Sign-Up by Friday, October 23rd here: https://forms.gle/tHrESfHUv9kBrRjFA

    Initially founded in 1977, Asian Pacific American Heritage Month (APAHM) honors and recognizes Asian Pacific Islander Desi American (APIDA) people in the United States and their contributions that enhance and enrich U.S. American history. While the heritage month is nationally recognized during the month of May, Clemson celebrates APAHM during the month of April. This form will close on October 23, 2020.

    Please contact Jerad Green at jeradg@clemson.edu with any questions.

  • Donning of the Kente

    Donning of the Kente

    Donning of the Kente is a multicultural celebration of graduates designed to celebrate the accomplishments of students who have contributed to enhancing diversity and inclusion at Clemson University. In 2005, the Gantt Center hosted its first multicultural celebration of graduates called Rite of Sankofa. After a decade long hiatus, the event was revived in 2016 as Donning of the Kente and has been celebrated every year since. The ceremony recognizes the academic, professional, and personal achievements of graduates as they transition into their post-collegiate lives. Rooted in African tradition, Donning of the Kente encourages students to identify a mentor who will present them with a Kente stole. The stole is a symbol of prestige and an official rite of passage.

    2020 Donning of the Kente
    Wednesday, May 5, 2021
    2 p.m.
    Grand Ballroom, Madren Center

    *Sign-up available in March 2021

  • Moving Forward: Student Leadership Retreat

    Moving Forward: Student Leadership Retreat has been designed to help our scholars build capacity for making change on campus and beyond. The purpose of Elevate is to foster brave spaces for undergraduate scholars, across various social identities, to explore topics of values, power, and social change and how they manifest in our daily experiences. Through a “why, how, what” framework – scholars will better understand how to positively enhance our campus community and greater society.

    Specific information for this year's Moving Forward will be shared once it is updated.

  • The Art of Multicultural Leadership

    The Art of Multicultural Leadership Retreat is designed to engage student leaders in critical and thought provoking methods to leading cultural and diverse student organizations through team building, active engagement with staff, and leadership development. Students can expect to learn the value of their roles as leaders in their organizations and how they can be effective in their planning processes while learning to work across differences.

    Staff members and advisers will be active in facilitating activities that allow students to reflect on their own values, strengths, and areas for improvement as leaders. Campus partners will give students valuable resources to help them make a lasting impact on the campus community. After this experience, student leaders will be equipped with knowledge of their roles and how they function, as well as how they can work to support the mission, goals and values of their organizations. Specifically, students will be able to use all of these leadership skills to impact the campus community.

    Registration Information Coming Soon.