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Profile Information


Douglas Seefeldt

Douglas Seefeldt

Associate Professor

Contact
Office: 14 Hardin Hall
Phone: 864/656-3153
Website: http://www.dougseefeldt.net/
Email: wseefel@clemson.edu

Education
PhD, Arizona State University (2001)

Curriculum Vitae


 

Douglas Seefeldt is digital historian with teaching and research interests that focus on the intersections of history and memory in the American West. He arrived at Clemson University in the fall of 2020 after spending eight years in the Department of History at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, where he was founding Research Director of the Digital Scholarship Lab from the fall of 2016 through the spring of 2020, a 2014-15 Fellow at the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University where he participated in the Workshop on Multimedia History and Literature: New Directions in Scholarly Design, and an Emerging Media Fellow with the BSU Center for Media Design from 2012-14.

Dr. Seefeldt is the Senior Digital Editor of The Papers of William F. Cody at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, WY, Co-Director of the William F. Cody Archive, and editor of the Cody Studies Digital Research Platform. He is the author of several digital history projects including, Envisaging the West: Thomas Jefferson and the Roots of Lewis and Clark, “Horrible Massacre of Emigrants!!”: The Mountain Meadows Massacre in Public Discourse, and Buffalo Bill’s Great Plains. He is Co-Series Editor of two related projects, The Papers of William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody series, published by the University of Nebraska Press that provides scholarly editions of various memoirs and autobiographies related to Buffalo Bill and his endeavors, and The William F. Cody Series on the History and Culture of the American West, that emphasizes scholarly monographs examining the regional, national, and international reach of William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody and his broad impact on an emergent mass culture and exploring the development of the American West and its representation in other forms of popular entertainment. His print scholarship includes a number of journal articles and essays and he is currently working on a digital monograph project treating the Mountain Meadows Massacre in public memory.

He grew up in Littleton, Colorado and is a graduate of Arapahoe High School, and went on to take a B.A. in cultural studies from Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, an M.A. in history from the University of Oregon in Eugene, Oregon, and a Ph.D. in history from Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona. He then spent three years at the University of Virginia as a Woodrow Wilson Academic Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at the Virginia Center for Digital History where he taught digital history courses in the Media Studies Program, western and environmental history courses in the Corcoran Department of History, and was Director of UVa’s Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Project from 2002-04. He then joined the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in the fall of 2004 in one of the first tenure-line hires in digital history as an Assistant Professor of History in the Department of History and a Faculty Fellow at the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities.


 

Selected Professional Works

Books (In Production or Under Contract)

Co-Editor, with Jeremy Johnston, “Buffalo Bill As He Is To-day”: Wild West Personas, Performers, and Legacies, an anthology of essays stemming from papers and keynote addresses presented at the Buffalo Bill Centennial Symposium hosted by The Papers of William F. Cody at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming, August 2-5, 2017. Manuscript under contract at the University of Nebraska Press.

Books (Edited)

Co-Editor, with Jeffrey L. Hantman, and Peter S. Onuf, Across the Continent: Jefferson, Lewis and Clark and the Making of America (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2005; paper, 2006).

Journal Articles & Book Chapters (Published)

“Buffalo Bill’s Wild West,” in America in the World, 1776 to the Present, A Supplement to the Dictionary of American History, 1st Edition. Edited by Edward J. Blum, Cara Burnidge, Emily Conroy-Krutz, David Kinkela. (Farmington Hills, MI: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2016), 160-64.

“Cartographic Representations of the American West on the Eve of the Mormon Exodus,” in, Far Away in the West: The Mormon Exodus of 1846-1847, Edited by Scott C. Esplin, Richard E. Bennett, Susan Easton Black and Craig K. Manscill. Religious Studies Center. (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 2015), 1-21.

“A National Monument,” co-author with Jason Heppler, in A Companion to Custer and the Little Big Horn Campaign, Edited by Brad D. Lookingbill. (Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015), 462-84..

“A Call to Redefine Historical Scholarship in the Digital Turn,” Co-Author, with Alex Galarza and Jason Heppler, Journal of Digital Humanities Vol. 1, No. 4 (Fall 2012): 31-34.

“What is Digital History? A Look at Some Exemplar Projects,” with William G. Thomas, III. Perspectives on History Newsmagazine of the American Historical Association, 47, no. 5 (May 2009): 40-43.

“Constructing Comanche Pasts: Landscape, Memory and the Cuerno Verde Rest Area,” New Mexico Historical Review, 81, no. 1 (winter 2006): 68-95.

“Creating Kearny: Forging a Historical Identity for a Central Arizona Mining Community,” Journal of Arizona History, 46, no. 1 (spring 2005): 1-32.

“Oñate’s Foot: Histories, Landscapes and Contested Memories in the Southwest,” Chapter 5 in Across the Continent: Jefferson, Lewis and Clark and the Making of America, Douglas Seefeldt, Jeffrey L. Hantman, and Peter S. Onuf, eds. (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2005, paper, 2006), 169-209.

Digital Works, Videos, CDs & DVDs, Software (Published)

Cody Studies Digital Research Platform, Editor, Cody WY: The Papers of William F. Cody, 2013-present.

The William F. Cody Archive, Co-Director (with Katherine Walter), Center for Digital Research in the Humanities, University of Nebraska-Lincoln and The Papers of William F. Cody, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, Cody, WY, 2011-present.

“Horrible Massacre of Emigrants!!”: The Mountain Meadows Massacre in Public Discourse, Center for Digital Research in the Humanities, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, phase 1: 2008, phase 2: 2012.

Envisaging the West: Thomas Jefferson and the Roots of Lewis and Clark, Virginia Center for Digital History, University of Virginia, and Center for Digital Research in the Humanities, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2009, OCLC# 368280152.

Co-Editor (with William G. Thomas), Digital History Project. National Endowment for the Humanities, Digital Humanities Start-up Grant, 2007.

Biddle Edition Archive, Virginia Center for Digital History, University of Virginia, 2004.





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