Current Projects

IDProject InfoCollegeCollege ID
18

Mirrors and Windows: A Children's Literature Newsletter

Students will produce a children's literature newsletter highlighting culturally diverse children's books across various genres.

Team Leaders
Jonda McNair Teacher Education
College of EducationE
21

Conservation of Marine Resources

The Conservation of Marine Resources Creative Inquiry team participates in marine ecology research to benefit the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Current projects include studying (1) the impact of shelter loss on the survival of juvenile Caribbean spiny lobsters, (2) using acoustic telemetry technology to track the movement of Caribbean spiny lobsters, (3) estimating effects of structure on reef fish diversity and abundance and, (4) studying the effects of coral disease on coral cover and reef fish communities in the Florida Keys.

Team Leaders
Kylie Smith Biological Sciences
Kara Noonan Biological Sciences
Michael Childress Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Crowfoot, E., *Garvey, R., *Sox, K., *Noonan, K., Childress, M. (2019, April). Evaluating the Effects of Artificial Versus Natural Reef Structures on Fish Communities in the Florida Keys. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Gardner, M., *Ingrum, I., Noonan, K., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 April 4-5) Effects of Hurricane Irma on reef community structure in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Poster Presentation at the Clemson University Student Research Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Whitaker, S., *Hulsey, R., Collins, M., *Way, E., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 April 2-3) A tail of two territories: gender differences in the territories of stoplight parrotfish, Sparisoma viride. Poster Presentation at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Jeanes, R., *Miller, E., *Stroud, C., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 April 2-3) Responses of transplanted and natural coral colonies to thermal stress events. Poster Presentation at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Gardner, M., *Ingrum, I., Noonan, K., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 March 10) Effects of Hurricane Irma on reef community structure in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Poster Presentation at the Clemson University Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Whitaker, S., *Hulsey, R., Collins, M., *Way, E., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 March 10) A tail of two territories: gender differences in the territories of stoplight parrotfish, Sparisoma viride. Poster Presentation at the Clemson University Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Jeanes, R., *Miller, E., *Stroud, C., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 March 10) Responses of transplanted and natural coral colonies to thermal stress events. Poster Presentation at the Clemson University Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Gardner, M., *Ingrum, I., Noonan, K., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 March 1) Effects of Hurricane Irma on reef community structure in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Poster Presentation at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Clemson, SC.
*Whitaker, S., *Hulsey, R., Collins, M., *Way, E., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 March 1) A tail of two territories: gender differences in the territories of stoplight parrotfish, Sparisoma viride. Poster Presentation at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Clemson, SC.
*Jeanes, R., *Miller, E., *Stroud, C., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 March 1) Responses of transplanted and natural coral colonies to thermal stress events. Poster Presentation at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Clemson, SC.
*Whitaker, S., *Rolfe, S., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2017, September 29). Conservation of Marine Resources Summer Research blog. Presented at the Creative Inquiry Summer Research Showcase, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Jeanes, R., *Miller, E., *Stroud, C., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2017, September 22). Responses of transplanted and natural coral colonies to thermal stress events. Presented at the Annual College of Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Guryan, T., *Sims, R., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2017, February 25). Clean Freaks: Neon gobies facilitate reef herbivore diversity. February 25, 2017. Poster presented at the 9th Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Dubnicka, I., *Krachman, H., *Ehlert, A. & Childress, M. (2017, April 12-16). Influence of reef characteristics on the abundance and social structure of two reef parrotfishes. Poster presentation at the 46th Annual meeting the Benthic Ecology Meeting, Myrtle Beach, SC.
*Ehlers, A., *Whitaker, S., *Fraser, L. & Smith, K. (2017 April 12-16). Influence of reef characteristics on the abundance and social structure of two reef parrotfishes. Oral presentation at the 46th Annual meeting the Benthic Ecology Meeting, Myrtle Beach, SC.
*Sims, R., *Towe, A., *Rolfe, S. & Smith, K. (2017, April 12-16). Influence of farmer and non-farmer damselfishes on coral transplant success. Oral presentation at the 46th Annual Benthic Ecology Meeting, Myrtle Beach, SC.
*Dubnicka, I., *Ehlers, A., *Ehlert, A., *Guryan, T., *Krachman, H., *Rolfe, S., *Sims, R., *Stroud, C., *Towe, A., *Whitaker, S., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2017, April 4-5) Forecasting the Future of Coral Reef Communities. Digital poster presented at the 12th Annual Focus On Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Guryan, T., *Sims, R., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2017, February). Clean Freaks: Neon gobies facilitate reef herbivore diversity. Poster presented at the Annual Clemson University Biological Sciences Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2017, April 12-16). Testing trophic cascades: Top-down versus bottom-up regulation of corals in the Florida Keys. Oral presentation at the 46th Annual meeting the Benthic Ecology Meeting, Myrtle Beach, SC.
*Ehlert, A. & Childress, M. (2016 April 12-16). What Factors Influence Den Sharing in Juvenile Spiny Lobsters? Oral presentation at the 45th Annual meeting the Benthic Ecology Meeting, Myrtle Beach, SC.
Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2017, January 4-8). "Top-down versus bottom-up regulation of coral cover in the Florida Keys". Oral presentation for Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology meeting, New Orleans, LA.
*Sims, R., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2017, January 4-8). "Defenders of the reef: Impacts of damselfish territoriality on coral reef community structure". Oral presentation for Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology meeting, New Orleans, LA.
*Fraser, L., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2016, March 12). Stay off my lawn: Territoriality and social structure differences in two species of reef parrotfishes. Oral presentation presented at the Annual meeting of the Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference, Tallahassee, FL.
*Sims, R., *Towe, A., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2016, March 12). Defenders of the reef: Impacts of damselfish territoriality on coral reef algal community structure. Oral presentation presented at the Annual meeting of the Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference, Tallahassee, FL.
Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2016, March 12). Top-down versus bottom-up regulation of corals in the Florida Keys. Oral presentation presented at the Annual meeting of the Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference, Tallahassee, FL.
*Guryan, T., *Ehlert, A., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2016, March 12). Going my own way: Testing why spiny lobsters are becoming less social. Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference, Tallahassee, FL.
*Guryan, T., *Ehlert, A., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2016, April 6-7). Going my own way: Testing why spiny lobsters are becoming less social. Presented at the 11th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Sims, R., *Towe, A., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2016, February 20). Defenders of the reef: Impacts of damselfish territoriality on coral reef algal community structure. Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Fraser, L., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2016, February 20). Stay off my lawn: Territoriality and social structure differences in two species of reef parrotfishes. Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Guryan, T., *Ehlert, A., Smith, K., and Childress, M. (2016, February 20). Going my own way: Testing why spiny lobsters are becoming less social. Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
Coster, D.*, Ehlers, A.*, Whitt, J., Smith, K., and Childress, M. 2016, February 20. Veggie Tails: Variable dietary selectivity of parrotfish in the Florida Keys. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Burgess, M.T., *Sims, R.J., Smith, K.M. & Childress, M.J. (2015). Rescuing the Reef: Monitoring the impacts of macroalgal competition and grazing on coral transplants. Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference, Athens, GA.
*Burgess, M., *Sims, R., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2015, April 6). Monitoring the impact of macroalgal competition and grazing on coral transplants. Presented at the 10th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC
*Ehlert, A., *Fraser, L., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2015, April 6). Are lobsters from disease free habitats more social? Presented at the 10th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC
*Whitt, J., *Drake-Lavelle, K., *Coster, D., Smith K. & Childress, M. (2015, April 6). Taking a bite out of the reef: factors influencing foraging patterns and dietary selectivity indices. Presented at the 10th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
Childress, M.J., Parmenter, K.J. (2012, October 10-11). Dying of Thirst: Impact of Reduced Freshwater Inflow on South Carolina Blue Crabs. Presented at the South Carolina Water Resources Conference proceedings, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
Childress, M.J. (2010, October 15-16). Modeling The Impact of Drought on South Carolina Blue Crabs Using a Spatially-Explicit Individual-Based Population Model. Presented at the 2010 South Carolina Water Resources Conference, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Hoffmann, S. L., *Quirk-Royal, B.E., Smith, K.M., Childress, M.J. (2014, March 20). It ain't easy being reef: impacts of competition and corallivory in Florida Keys. Oral presentation at the 43rd Benthic Ecology Meeting, Jacksonville, FL.
Holt, B., *McClellan, K., *Watts, R., *Witt, R., Parmenter, K. & Childress, M. (2012, March). Impact of Drought on Blue Crab Health. Presented at the 2012 Benthic Ecology Meeting, Norfolk, VA
*Gurley, A., Parmenter, K., Childress, M. (2011, March). The influence of salinity variation on juvenile blue crab growth and survival. Presented at the 2011 Benthic Ecology Meeting, Mobile, AL.
*Miller, S.D., Heldt, K.A. & Childress, M.J. (2013, March). Effects of ocean acidification on aggression and den sharing behavior of juvenile Caribbean spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus. Presented at the 2013 Benthic Ecology Meeting, Savannah, GA.
*Micklewright, J., Parmenter, K. & Childress, M. (2011, March). The influence of salinity variation on Hematodinium sp. infection of blue crabs in the ACE Basin. Presented at the 2011 Benthic Ecology Meeting, Mobile, AL.
*McClellan, K., *Quirk-Royal, B., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2013, March). Who says intermediacy is a bad thing? Influences of community factors on coral diversity in the Florida Keys. Presented at the 2013 Benthic Ecology Meeting, Savannah, GA.
*Clarke, L., *Cunningham, K., Heldt, K. & Childress, M. (2013, April 9). Personality in lobsters: Do juvenile spiny lobsters show repeatability in their social and anti-social behaviors? Presented a the 8th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Hoffmann, S. L., *O'Connor, E.K., *Burgess, M.T., Moody, K.N. & Childress, M.J. (2014, March 20). Modeling population structure and adaptation in a Hawaiian stream goby: Sicyopterus stimpsoni. Poster presented at the 2014 Benthic Ecology Meeting, Jacksonville, FL.
*Quirk-Royal, B., *Hoffmann, S., Childress, M. & Smith, K. (2014, April 3). Just keep grazing: Parrotfish grazing and dietary selectivity in the Florida Keys. Poster presented at the 9th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Hoffmann, S. & Childress, M. (2014, April 3). It's not easy being a reef: Impacts of competition and corallivory in the Florida Keys. Poster presented at the 9th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*O'Connor, E.K., *Burgess, M.T., Moody, K.N. & Childress, M.J. (2014, April 3). Modeling population structure and adaptation in a Hawaiian stream goby: Sicyopterus stimpsoni. Poster presented at the 9th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Ellis, J.R., *Cunningham, K.G., Heldt, K.A. & Childress, M.J. (2014, March 20). Do Spiny Lobsters Prefer to Associate with Familiar Individuals? Poster presented at the 2014 Benthic Ecology Meeting, Jacksonville, FL.
Smith, K.M., Childress, M.J. (2014, March 20). Historical vs. contemporary effects on coral cover in the Florida Keys. Presented at the 43rd Benthic Ecology Meeting, Jacksonville, FL.
*Cunningham, K., *Ellis, J. & Childress, M. (2014, April 3). Do spiny lobsters prefer to associate with familiar individuals? Poster presented at the 9th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
Noonan, K. Clemson University Professional Enrichment Grant - $750
$900 raised for Spring Break trip to conduct research in the Florida Keys. We raised this money through various fundraisers including bake sales, Krispy Kreme, Groucho’s, Go Fund Me, TDs, and other personal donations.
Smith, K. International Women’s Fishing Association - $1000
ACC Fellowship in Innovation and Creativity awarded to Thomas Guryan This fellowship program supports undergraduate student-driven research projects at the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) campuses. Fellows are sponsored by the Clemson University Office of Undergraduate Studies and the Atlantic Coast Conference Inter-institutional Academic Collaborative (ACCIAC). Each Fellow receives an award of up to $4,000 to conduct innovative research. The project must be substantially the idea of the student, though it may derive from previous work with a mentor. Examples of project outcomes might include publication, artistic work, presentation or a proof-of-concept proposal. Fellows receive additional funding to present their project results at the 2017 ACC Undergraduate Research Conference. Application forms for this fellowship are available in early February each year. The Fellowship research period is March through August. http://www.clemson.edu/academics/programs/creative-inquiry/opportunities/?type=all
The Explorer’s Club Youth Activity Fund Grant awarded to Randi Sims. The Explorers Club is proud of its history but also looks toward the future, recognizing the importance of new ideas and avenues of exploration. The Club is deeply committed to supporting the fieldwork of serious researchers and, as part of its public service commitment, offers the following grants: The Youth Activity Fund Grant supports high school students and college undergraduates. Its goal is to foster a new generation of explorers dedicated to the advancement of the scientific knowledge of our world. Awards range from $500 to $5,000. We recommend keeping your budget realistic. The average award is approximately $1,500. Only a few grants may be awarded at the $5,000 level. https://explorers.org/expeditions/funding/expedition_grants
Women Diver’s Hall of Fame undergraduate conservation research grant awarded to Randi Sims. The Women Divers Hall of Fame™ (WDHOF) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to honoring and raising awareness of the contributions of outstanding women divers. WDHOF provides educational, mentorship, financial, and career opportunities to the diving community throughout the world. Each year, WDHOF awards scholarships and training grants that provide financial and educational support to individuals of all ages, particularly those who are preparing for professional careers that involve diving. Marine conservation has been our most popular and most competitive scholarship opportunity for several years. The scholarships will be awarded to qualified women of any age who are enrolled in accredited graduate or undergraduate academic or research programs in the field of marine conservation. http://www.wdhof.org/scholarships/scholarships.shtml
Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference best undergraduate oral presentation 3rd place awarded to *Randi Sims
Clemson University Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium undergrad poster presentation 1st place awarded to *Daniel Coster
Clemson University Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium undergrad poster presentation 3rd place awarded to *Lauren Fraser
Phil and Mary Bradley Award for Mentoring in Creative Inquiry - May 2015 - Clemson, SC
Best Undergraduate Poster - Second Place - Clemson Biological Sciences Student Symposium - Feb 2015 - Clemson, SC
Outstanding Undergraduate Research Poster 2010 Benthic Ecology Meeting - Wilmington, NC
Best Undergraduate Poster - First Place - 2014 Focus on Creative Inquiry Symposium
Childress, M. J., Heldt, K. A., & Miller, S. D. (2015). Are juvenile Caribbean spiny lobsters (Panulirus argus) becoming less social? ICES Journal of Marine Science: Journal Du Conseil, 72(suppl 1), i170–i176. https://doi.org/10.1093/icesjms/fsv045
Heldt, K., Bridges WC, jr, & Childress, M. (2015). Behavioral response to habitat loss in juvenile spiny lobsters. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 521, 117–128. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps11125
Parmenter, K. J., Vigueira, P. A., *Morlok, C. K., *Micklewright, J. A., Smith, K. M., Paul, K. S., & Childress, M. J. (2013). Seasonal Prevalence of Hematodinium sp. Infections of Blue Crabs in Three South Carolina (USA) Rivers. Estuaries and Coasts, 36(1), 174–191. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12237-012-9556-1
Conducting research at the Keys Marine Laboratory.
Counting jellyfish in Long Key Lake, Long Key State Park.
Building parrotfish exclusion cages.
Conducting fish surveys using Go Pro cameras.
Analyzing water samples at the Keys Marine Laboratory.
Taking plankton samples from Florida Bay.
Preparing corals fragments for transplantation on the reef.
Atlantic spadefish on the Benwood Wreck.
Exploring the wreck of the Spiegel Grove.
Underwater videophotography while on SCUBA.
Anemone shrimp in a giant purple anemone.
Juvenile spiny lobsters crowding under a coral head.
Learning sponge identification while in the water.
Three amigos on SCUBA.
On the boat heading out to Looe Key Reef.
Pillar coral at the Looe Key SPA.
Conducting research at the Keys Marine Laboratory.
CMR team versus the giant lobster.
Live coral at Cheeca Rocks SPA.
Hawksbill turtle at the Cheeca Rocks SPA.
Checking a juvenile lobster for a microwire tag.
Conducting research at the Keys Marine Laboratory.
Stuck in the pluff mud.
Ready to pull some crab pots on the Combahee River.
Sampling the pluff mud soft sediment community.
Drawing blood from a blue crab to check for disease.
College of ScienceG
1586

AI in Biomedicine: Prediction and Annotation of Novel Disease Genes by Genomic Data Mining

In the human genome, most genes actually do not encode proteins; they are noncoding RNA genes. The largest class of noncoding genes is known as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are transcripts greater in length than 200 nucleotides, but with no protein-coding capacity. While some lncRNAs have been demonstrated to be key regulators of gene expression and 3D genome organization, most lncRNAs are still uncharacterized. We have thus been developing machine learning and data mining approaches for the functional annotation of human lncRNAs, as well as circular RNAs (circRNAs), by leveraging the vast amount of genetic and genomic data ("biological big data"). Our recent studies demonstrate that genomic data mining can give insights into RNA functions and provide valuable information for experimental studies of candidate lncRNAs. This CI project will focus on the identification and functional analysis of novel candidate lncRNAs (or circRNAs) associated with human diseases, including autism and intellectual disability. 

Team Leaders
Liangjiang Wang Genetics and Biochemistry
College of ScienceG
23

Courage and Positive Psychology Research

What is courage? Can people become more courageous? How can people lead better lives? The Courage and Positive Psychology CI team conducts scientific investigations into courage and other virtues and human well-being. 

Team Leaders
Cynthia Pury Psychology
Accomplishments
Pury, C., Brawley, A., Lopez, S., & Burnett, E. (2016). Courage. In C. Snyder, S. Lopez, L. Edwards, & S. Marques (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of positive psychology 3rd ed., 1-24. doi:10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199396511.013.30
Pury, C. L. S., Starkey, C. B., *Kulik, R. E., *Skjerning, K. L., & Sullivan, E. A. (2015). Is courage always a virtue? Suicide, killing, and bad courage. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 10(5), 383–388. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439760.2015.1004552
Pury, C. L. S., Britt, T. W., Zinzow, H. M., Raymond, M. A. (2014). Blended courage: Moral and psychological courage elements in mental health treatment seeking by active duty military personnel. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 9, 30-41.
Lester, P., and Pury, C. (2011). What leaders should know about courage. In Sweeney, P., Matthews, M., Lester, P. What leaders should know about courage.Leadership in dangerous situations: A handbook for the armed forces, emergency services and first responders. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 21-39.
Pury, C. L. S. Starkey, C. (2010). Is courage an accolade or a process: A fundamental question for courage research. In Gruber, C. The psychology of courage: Modern research on an ancient virtue. Washington DC, American Psychological Association, pp. 67-87.
Pury, C. L. S., Lopez, S. J. (2010). Introduction. In Gruber, C. The psychology of courage: Modern research on an ancient virtue. Washington DC, American Psychological Association, pp. 3 - 5.
Pury, C. L. S. Starkey, C. (2010). The future of courage research. In Gruber, C. The psychology of courage: Modern research on an ancient virtue. Washington DC, American Psychological Association, pp. 229 - 235.
Pury, C. L. S., & Hensel, A. D. (2010). Are courageous actions successful actions? The Journal of Positive Psychology, 5(1), 62–72. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439760903435224
Pury, C. L. S., Lopez, S. J. (2009). Courage. In Lopez, S, and Snyder, C. In Lopez, S, and Snyder, C. Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology, 2nd Ed. New York, NY. Oxford University Press. pp.375-382.
Pury, C. L. S. (2009). Perseverance. In Lopez, S., The Encyclopedia of Positive Psychology, Vol. 2. Oxford, UK. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 678-682. ISBN: 1780341776, 9781780341774
Pury, C. L. S., Woodard, C. (2009). Courage. In Lopez, S., The Encyclopedia of Positive Psychology, Vol. 1. Oxford, UK. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 247-254.
Pury, C. L. S. (2008). Can courage be learned Positive psychology: Exploring the best in people, in Lopez, S., Positive Psychology: Discovering human strengths. Westport, CT. Praeger Publishers, pp. 109 - 130.
Pury, C. L. S., & Kowalski, R. M. (2007). Human strengths, courageous actions, and general and personal courage. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 2(2), 120–128. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439760701228813
Pury, C. L. S., Kowalski, R. M., & Spearman, J. (2007). Distinctions between general and personal courage. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 2(2), 99–114. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439760701237962
Pury, C. L. S., Starkey, C., Breeden, C., Kelley, C., Murphy, H., & Lowndes, A. (2014) Courage interventions: Future directions and cautions. In Parks, A., and Schueller, S., The handbook of positive psychological interventions (A. Parks- Sheiner, Ed.), Oxford, UK, Wiley-Blackwell (301-323). ISBN 978-1-119-95056-1
Wasko, L., Pury, C. L. S. (2009). Affective forecasting. In Lopez, S., The Encyclopedia of Positive Psychology, Vol. 1. Oxford, UK. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 24-26.
Woodard, C. R., & Pury, C. L. S. (2007). The construct of courage: Categorization and measurement. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 59(2), 135–147. https://doi.org/10.1037/1065-9293.59.2.135
Pury, C. (2013). Fostering courage in individuals: Basic directions and cautions.In: Burke, R., and Cooper C.,Voice and whistleblowing in organizations: Overcoming fear, fostering courage, and unleashing candor. Cheltnham, UK: Edward Elgar. pp. 343-357.
Pury, C. (2013). Proposed frailties of courage and related interventions.In Burke, R., Fox, S., and Cooper, C. Human frailties: Wrong choices on the drive to success. New York, NY. Gower Publishing, pp. 261-267.
Grau, C., & Pury, C. L. S. (2013). Attitudes Towards Reference and Replaceability. Review of Philosophy and Psychology, 5(2), 155–168. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13164-013-0162-3
Pury, C. L. S., Glennon, K. N. (2014). Psychological and Spiritual Aspects of Courage for Self-Renewal. In Wicks, R., Maynard, E., Clinician's Guide to Self-Renewal: Essential Advice from the Field. Hoboken, N.J., John Wiley & Sons, 251-262.
Pury, C. L. S. (2017, July). Nature is lumpy: Goal-risk parings and types of courage. Symposium contribution to Pioneering and Profiling Courage: The work and legacy of Shane Lopez. Presented at the 5th World Congress on Positive Psychology, Montreal, Quebec.
*Jordan, M., Burnett, E., *Wisch, N., *Vanelli, N., *Clancy, K., *Russell, L, *Gonzalez, K., *Kouser, A., & Pury, C. (2017, March). Views of Controversial Decisions Based on One's Values. Poster presented at the 63rd annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Atlanta, GA.
Burnett, E. A., Pury, C. L. S., & Ellenberg, D. (2017, July 13-16). Interpersonal Courage in Organizations. Presented at the 5th World Congress on Positive Psychology, Montreal, Quebec.
Hardy, B. P., Pury, C. L. S., & *Jordan, M. J. (2017, July 13-16). Does it take Courage to Start a Business? Presented at the 5th World Congress on Positive Psychology, Montreal, Quebec.
Pury, C. L. S., Starkey, C. B., Saylors, S., *Vanelli, N., *Cataldo, A., *Nichols, E. R., & *Green, M. M. P. (2017, July 13-16). Virtues as Guides to Maximizing Well-Being: A Theoretical and Empirical Exploration. Presented at the 5th World Congress on Positive Psychology, Montreal, Quebec.
Pury, C. L. S., Olson, L. R., Starkey, C. B., Burnett, E. A., *Jordan, M. J., *Cataldo, A., *Gonzalez, K. R., *Nichols, E. R., & *Green, M. M. P. (2017, July 13-16). Accolade Courage as a Reflection of the Observer’s Values. Presented at the 5th World Congress on Positive Psychology, Montreal, Quebec.
Pury, C. L. S. (2016, July). Process Courage, Accolade Courage, and Meaning. Paper presented at the 9th Biennial International Meaning Conference, Toronto, Ontario.
Pury, C. L. S., Olson, L. R., Starkey, C. B., Burnett, E. A., *Wisch, N. R., *Vanelli, N., *Clancy, K. E., *Russell, L. E. & *Gonzalez, K. R. (2016, July 28-31). Awards for Bravery: Accolade Courage and Meaning. Poster to be presented at the 9th Biennial International Meaning Conference, Toronto, Ontario.
Pury, C. L. S., Hardy, B. P., *Jordan, M. J., *Vanelli, N., *Wisch, N. R., *Gonzalez, K. R., *Clancy, K. E. & *Russell L. E. (2016, July 28-31). Valuing Goals as a Strategy to Increase Courage. Poster presented at the 9th Biennial International Meaning Conference, Toronto, Ontario.
Pury, C. L. S., Brawley, A. M., Burnett, E. A., *Gonzalez, K. R., *Russell, L. E., *Clancy, K. E., *Jordan, M. J. *Vanelli, N., *Wisch, N. R. & *Allen F. E. (2016, July 28-31). A Situational View of Courage: Affordances for Action, Goals, and Risks. Poster to be presented at the 9th Biennial International Meaning Conference, Toronto, Ontario.
Kowalski, R. M., Pury, C.L. S., Sporrer, L., Hunter, E., Gorney, A., Baker, M., Smith, L., Elrod, M., DeWitt, S., Sternfeld, J., Mitchell, T. (2006, November). Courage and hope Pathways to action. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists, Knoxville, TN.
Pury, C., Starkey, C., *Hawkins, C., Weber, C., Saylors, S. (2009, June). A cognitive appraisal model of courage. Presented at the First World Congress on Positive Psychology, Philadelphia, PA.
Pury, C., Kowalski, R., McRae, T., Kentera, J., Arnold, C., Becht, C., Starkey, J. (2006, October). Getting up the nerve Self-reports of deliberate attempts to increase courage. In C. Pury (Chair) Symposium Courage. Presented at the 5th Gallup International Positive Psychology Summit, Washington, DC.
Pury, C. L. S., Starkey, C., Breeden, C., Murphy, H. & Kelley, C. (2011, July 25). A goal systems theory explanation of courage. Poster presented at the 2nd International Positive Psychology World Congress, Philadelphia, PA.
Campbell, R., Pury, C. (2005, September). Moral courage, self-esteem, and self-respect. Poster presented at the 4th International Positive Psychology Summit, Washington, DC.
Hensel, A., Pury, C. (2005, September). Courage in retrospect An investigation into the roles of self presentation and hindsight. Poster presented at the 4th International Positive Psychology Summit, Washington, DC.
Pury, C., Kowalski, R. (2005, September). Human strengths, courageous actions, and general and personal courage. Poster presented at the 4th Gallup International Positive Psychology Summit,Washington, DC.
Wasko, L. E., Pury, C. L. S. (2006, October). An empirical integration of affective forecasting and the Good Life. Poster presented at the 5th Gallup International Positive Psychology Summit,Washington, DC.
Higgenbottom, L., Pury, C. (2006, November). Getting up the nerve to overcome. Is there a relationship between the type of obstacles individuals encounter and the methods used to increase courage. Presented at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS), Anaheim, CA.
Pury, C. L. S. (2008, August). Types of courage within an organizational context. Presented at the 2008 Annual Academy of Management Meeting, Annaheim, CA.
Pury, C. L. S. (2007, October). Goal pursuit, meaning, and courage. Presented at the 2007 Courage Summit, Washington, D.C.
Pury, C. L. S. (2008, April). The psychology of courage. Presented at 2008 University of South Carolina Lancaster Community Health Lecture Series, Lancaster, SC.
Pury, C. L. S., Starkey, C., Wueste, D. (2008, October). Cognitive appraisals, Courage, and academic integrity. Presented at the 2008 Center for Academic Integrity Conference, Myrtle Beach, SC.
Kelley, C. & Pury, C. L. S. (2011, May 19-22) Development and validation of a workplace courage scale. Poster presented at Work, Stress, and Health 2011: Work and Well-Being in an Economic Context, Orlando, FL.
Pury, C. L. S. & Starkey, C. (2013, July 31 - August 4). Is Courage always a virtue? Suicide, killing, and bad courage. Poster presented at the American Psychological Association 2013 Annual Convention, Honolulu, HI.
Pury, C. L. S. & Murphy, H. J. (2013, April). Courage interventions in the workplace. Paper presented at the 28th Annual Conference of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP), Houston, TX.
Pury, C. L. S. & Starkey, C. (2013, February). A cognitive appraisal theory of courage. Presented at the American Philosophical Association 2013 Central Division Meeting, New Orleans, LA.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
32

Motion Science and Applied Psychophysiology Lab

This lab is focused on understanding the relationship between human sensory systems and virtual reality devices, particularly focusing on simulator sickness. Students in this lab learn how to use psychophysiology recording tools, design/run an experiment, and read papers associated with virtual reality and motion sickness. The goal is to have students create their own methodology or ask their own question that leads to creation of a poster to present at a conference annually. 

Team Leaders
Eric R. Muth Psychology
Sarah Beadle Psychology
Accomplishments
*Dischiavi, N., *Daniels, B., *Henderson, L., *Hourigan, C., *Beadle, S., Muth, E. (2019, April). Can You Adapt to a Virtual Rollercoaster? Using Stomach Activity and Surveys to Assess Simulator Sickness Over Time. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Waters, D., *Cavanaugh, S., *Wegner, H. & Kinsella, A. (2018, March) Social Implications of Using Remote Food Photography Method Comapred to a Wrist-Worn Bite Counting Device. Presented at the Southeastern Psychological Association, Charleston, SC.
*Russell, L., *Hourigan, C., *Daniels, B., *Messinger, C. & Kinsella, A. (2018, March) Comparing Ease of Use of a Bite Goal Comared to a Calorie Goad During a Meal. Presented at the Southeastern Psychological Association, Charleston, SC.
*Simpson, S. & Kinsella, A. (2018, March) Trait Anxiety Predicts Motion Sickness in Head-Mounted Display. Presented at the Southeastern Psychological Association, Charleston, SC.
*Daniels, B. & Kinsella, A. (2018, April) Using a Wrist-Worn Device to Eat to a Bite Goal: Does Behavior Change? Presented at the Southeastern Human Factors Applied Research Conference, Clemson, SC. 
*Cavanaugh, S., *Daniels, B., *Messinger, C., *Russell, L., *Waters, D., *Wegner, H., *Hourigan, C., Beadle, S. & Muth, E.R. (2018, April 2-3) Studying eating behavior with mobile health technologies. Presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
Beadle, S., Salley, J., McSorely, J. Determining Criteria for Valid Data in Long Term Studies with Wearable Devices. Southeastern Human Factors Applied Research Conference, Raleigh, NC, April, 2017.
*Hwang, T., *Muth, E., *Guercio, H., *Demos, J. (2017, April 4-5). Taking a Bite from the Mindless Margin. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Burns, D., *Kohm, K., *Timmons, E., *Elsey, T., *Jeanes, K., *Rampey, L., *Williams, L., *Dison, R., *Schroer, R., and Muth, E. (2013, April). Accuracy of the Bite Counter Device in a Cafeteria Setting. Poster presented at FoCI, Clemson University. 
*Westmoreland, M., *Brown, M., *Dixon, R., *Good, H., *Jackson, C., *Jasper, P., *Kohm, K., *Owens, R., *Srickland, C., *Sowell, A., and Muth, E. (2012, April). An Assessment of the Use of Bite Count as an Energy Intake Monitor in a Cafeteria Setting. Poster presented at FoCI, Clemson University. 
McSorley, J. (2017 April 1). "An Overview of the Effects of Latency on Simulator Sickness in Head-Mounted Displays". Poster presented at the Southeastern Human Factors Applied Research Conference, Raleigh, NC.
*Jasper, P.W., Scisco, J.L., Parker, V.G., Hoover, A.W. & Muth E.R. (2012). Using the Bite Counter Device to Measure Energy Intake in Overweight African Americans. Presented at the American College of Sports Medicine conference, San Francisco, CA.
*Salley, J. N., Scisco, J. L., Hoover, A. W. & Muth, E. R. (2011, October). Variability in bite count and calories per bite across identical meals. Poster presented at the 29th Annual Meeting of the Obesity Society, Orlando, FL.
Scisco, J.L., Muth, E.R., Dong, Y., Hoover, A.W., O'Neil, P.M. & Fishel-Brown, S.R. (2011 Sept 19-23). Usability and acceptability of the bite counter device. Presented at the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, NV.
Hope, Stephanie, and Della at SEPA.
Bryson, Christianna, and Lindsey at SEPA. 
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
216

Bundling Food, Nutrition, and Packaging Sciences

Undergraduate teams with academic experience in culinary science, nutrition, packaging science, and those with interest in sociology collaborate in new product, recipe, services development and testing as well as evaluation for youth and families in the Upstate of South Carolina.   

Team Leaders
Margaret Condrasky Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
Accomplishments
*Goodine, J., *Krantz, C., *Kryshak, V., *Martinez, A., *Messick, L., *Newton, H., *Oneill, A., *Ott, A., *Price, A., *Rast, A., *Shackleford, L., *Yeates, M., Condrasky, M. (2019, April). Produce Rx. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Adair, J., *Andrew, B., *Babson, E., *Bartz, M., *Baxley, M., *Bernhardt, A., *Buzhardt, C., *Cobb, K., *Dillard, J., *Downs, R., *Eades, A., *Marsh, S., *Martinez, A., *Mattocks, C., *Murphy, K., *Russell, N., *Whitlow, A., Condrasky, M., Darby, D. (2017, April). Healthy Children's Food Product Development. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Coffee, A., Condrasky, M., Darby, D., Halteman, B., Sharp, J.(2016, May 5). Development and Testing of Supplemental Materials For a Product Development Course to Include Herbs, Spices and Sensory Science. Poster presentation at the 2016 South Carolina Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Annual Conference, Columbia, SC. 
Coffee, A., Scharp, J., Weeks, A., Condrasky, M., Darby, D. (2016, March). Healthy Foods Created within an Applied Interdisciplinary Product Development Course. Poster presentation at the 2016 Research Chefs Association Annual Conference and Culinology Expo, Denver, CO. 
*Blankenship, C., *Cobb, K., *Cucco, P., *Floyd, Z., *Knight, A., *Mars, M, *Prevost, J., *Prochaska, A., *Sullivan, K., *Wood, K., Condrasky, M., Duncan, D. (2016, April). Applied Interdisciplinary Healthy Food Product Development for Children. Poster presentation at Clemson University 11th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Condrasky, M., Weeks, A., Darby, D., Sharp, J., Coffee, A., Halteman, B. (2015). Applied Interdisciplinary Product Development for Sophomore Students. Presented at the Research Chefs Association, New Orleans, LA.
Condrasky, M., Darby, D., Sharp, J., Weeks, A. (2016, June). Applied Interdisciplinary Product Development Course Design and Implementation. Journal article accepted by the Journal of Food Science Education.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
217

Culinary Nutrition

This team collaborates with providers of children programs and services in the Upstate of SC to define, create, and test programs with a culinary and nutrition emphasis for adolescent children. Examples of previous programs have been cooking camps, healthy lifestyle competitions and recipe set development.

Team Leaders
Margaret Condrasky Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
Accomplishments
*Brookshire, C., *Castillo, A., *Duffy, C., *Funcik, A., *Garwatoski, A., *Lewis, C., *Martinez, A., *Nesbitt, T., *Pesce, G., Condrasky, M. (2019, April). Design and Evaluation of a Melting Pot: Culture and Cuisine Summit. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Flowers, L., *Forbes, H., *Hudachek, G., *Jordan, T., *King, C., *Longobardo, A., *Mahoney, S., *Marshall, V., *Richardson, J., *Thomas, K., *Wendt, E., Condrasky, M. (2017, April). Vegetable Recipes that Families Choose. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Coffee, A., Scharp, J., Weeks, A., Condrasky, M., and Darby, D. (2016, March). Healthy Foods Created within an Applied Interdisciplinary Product Development Course. Poster presentation at the 2016 Research Chefs Association Annual Conference and Culinology Expo, Denver, CO. 
*Blakenship, C., *Cobb, K., *Cucco, P., *Floyd, Z., *Knight, A., *Mars, M., *Prevost, J., *Prochaska, A., *Sullivan, K., *Wood, K., and *Condrasky, M. (2016, April 7). Applied Interdisciplinary Healthy Food Product Development for Children. Poster presented at 2016 Focus On Creative Inquiry, Watt Family Innovation Center.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
69

Cyber Bullying

This project examines a variety of aversive interpersonal behaviors, most notably cyberbullying, hazing, and school shootings. People engage in a variety of aversive interpersonal behaviors. Some of these behaviors are more mundane, such as guilt-induction. Others, such as those that constitute the focus of this team, are more insidious in nature, and have potentially fatal consequences. One of the interesting things about these behaviors is that, as seemingly disparate as they appear, there is actually quite a bit of overlap between them. For example, our research suggests an overlap between bullying and hazing. Additionally, one of the key predictors of perpetrating a school shooting is a long-term history of rejection, manifested most often through a history of bullying. One focus of our team with all of these behaviors is not only understanding antecedents and consequences but also prevention and intervention strategies. 

Team Leaders
Robin Kowalski Psychology
Accomplishments
*Bednar, H., *Bourque, L., *Wells, S., Franchi, N., Graham, R., Scarborough, M., Foster, M., Crawford, K., Nash, S., & Kowalski, R. (2019, April). Hazing and Bullying. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Crawford, K., *Foster, M., *Hughes, A., *Nash, S., *Franchi, M., *Bednar, H., Kowalski, R. M., *Geary, E., *Brady, A., *Luber, C., *Taylor, K., *Doghman, M., *Garrett, B., & *Pitts, B. (2018, March 1-3). Sorry, I’m not sorry: Apologies in interpersonal Interactions. Paper presented at the 2018 Annual meeting of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology, Atlanta, GA.
*Crawford, K., *Geary, E., *Dickson, A., *Foster, M., *Brady, A., *Pitts, B., *Nash, S., *Luber, C., *Doghman, M., *Bednar, H., *Taylor, K., *Morgan, M., & Kowalski, R. (2017, April). Change the Name, Change the Game: Cyberbullying Changes with Platform. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Crawford, K., *Morgan, M., Kowalski, R., *Geary, E., *Dickson, A., *Foster, M., *Taylor, K., *Brady, A., *Pitts, B., *Nash, S., *Luber, C., *Doghman, M., & *Bednar, H. (2017). Change the name, change the game: Cyberbullying changes with platform. Paper to be presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Atlanta, GA.
Kowalski,R. M., Morgan, M.*, Taylor, K, Broderick, A., Schrader, K., Geary, E., Wilson, E., Brady, A., Pitts, B., Wewers, L., Vernau, J.,Dickson, A., & Whittaker, E. (2016). Hard to say I'm sorry or is it?: Apologies in interpersonal interactions. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists. 
Dillon, E., Macbeth, J., Kowalski, R. M., *Whittaker, E., & Gilbert, J. (2016). “Is this cyberbullying or not?”: Intertwining computational detection with human perception (A case study). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics, Orlando, FL.
Kowalski, R. M., & Morgan, M. (2016). Technology to overcome the stigma of mental illness. Paper presented at the meeting of the Southeastern Symposium on Mental Health, Greenville, SC.
Whittaker, E., Kowalski, R. M., Dillon, E., & Macbeth, J. (2016). Is it or isn’t it? Cyberbullying in conversations. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, New Orleans, LA.
Whittaker, E., & Kowalski, R. M. (2016). Cyberbullying in political campaigns. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, New Orleans, LA.
Morgan, M., Kowalski, R. M., *Geary, E., *Schroeder, K., *Wilson, E., *Broderick, A., *Brady, A., *Wewars, L., *Dickson, A., *Taylor, K., *Vernau, J., *Pfeiffer, C. (2016). Going postal in a digital world: Online workplace bullying/incivility. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, New Orleans, LA.
*Toth, A. & Kowalski, R. M. (2015). Bullying in adulthood. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists, Winston-Salem, NC.
Kowalski, R. M., *Toth, A., Dillon, E., Macbeth, J., Herzog, A., Thatcher, J. (2015). Cyberbullying among individuals with disabilities. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists, Winston-Salem, NC.
Morgan, M., *Geary, E., *Zaremba, B., *Drake-Lavelle, K., Stephens, J., *Toth, A., *Whittaker, E., *Wewars, L., *Pfeiffer, C., *Huff, M., *Dickson, A., *Brady, A., Kowalski, R. (2015). Get up, Stand up: The effects of bystanders self-compassion and interpersonal reactivity on intervening in cyberbullying situations. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists, Winston-Salem, NC.
*Allison, A., Kowalski, R. M. (2015). The Relations between Psychological Health Climate and Individual Health Behaviors. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Work, Stress, and Health Conference, Atlanta, GA.
*Morgan, M., *Toth, A., *Whittaker, E., *Stephens, J., *Webb, M., *Geary, E., *Drake-Lavelle, K. (2015). Bystander reactions to cyberbullying. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Hilton Head, SC.
*Morgan, M., Kowalski, R., *Geary, E., *Drake-Lavelle, K., *Whittaker, E., *Ballard, T., *Huff, M., *Zaremba, B., *Toth, A., *Pfeiffer, C. (2014). Complaining in the media: Regional differences in dissatisfaction expressed in letters to the editor. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists, Athens, GA.
Wynkoop, G., Kowalski, R., *Robinson, A., *Blackshire, E., *Toth, A., *Lankowski, C., *Emerson, L., *Dogan, J., Smith, B., Sherck, K., Brown, L., *Whittaker, E., *Allison, B. (2014). Ask me about 27. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists, Athens, GA.
*Baker, B., Kowalski, R. M. (2013, March). Bullying and cyberbullying among college students with disabilities. Paper to be presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Atlanta, GA.
*Baker, B., Kowalski, R. M., *Fortune, A., *Morgan, M., *Murphy, C., Schroeder, A. (2013, March). College narratives Understanding student identity through passion dispersion. Paper to be presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Atlanta, GA.
Baker, B.*, Kowalski, R. M., McMillan, V.*, Turner, J*., Whittaker, E.*, Elsey, T., Fortune, A.*, Morgan, M., Murphy, M., Maclennan, C.*, Frazee, L.*, Stephens, J.* (2012, November). Happiness and passion: What type of passion defines happy people. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists, Gainesville, FL.
*Baker, B., Kowalski, R. M., *Turner J., *Whittaker, E., *Frazee, E., *MacLennan, C., *Murphy, C., *Stephens, J., *Elsey, T., *McMillan, V., *Morgan, M., *Fortune, A. (2013, March). Pet peeves and happiness How do happy people complain. Paper to be presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Atlanta, GA.
*Baker, B., Schroeder, A., Kowalski, R. M. (2013, June). Energizing our way to a better workforce An examination of employee energy and passion. Paper to be presented at the Work, Stress, and Health Conference, Los Angeles, CA.
Brooke, B. A. & Kowalski, R. M. (2012). Domain and range Determining passion dispersion among college students. Paper presented at the Annual meeting of the Research Experience for Undergraduate Students, Clemson, SC.
*Freeman, S., *Fulmer, R. M., *Johnson, E., *Louderback, S., *Richman, A. & Kowalski, R. M. (2011, March). Priming empathy in cyberbullying situations. Paper presented at the Annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Jacksonville, FL.
*Freeman, S., Kowalski, R. M. & Woorons-Johnston, S. (2011, March). Athletic attainment. Paper presented at the Annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Jacksonville, FL.
Giumetti, G., Schroeder, A.*, Kowalski, R. M. (2013, June). Two-wave panel study investigating the relative impact of cyber and face-to-face incivility on employee outcomes. Paper to be presented at the Work, Stress, and Health Conference, Los Angeles, CA.
*Hatfield, A., Guiumetti, G. & Kowalski, R. M. (2011, March). Effects of experiencing cyber-incivility in the workplace. Paper presented at the Annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Jacksonville, FL.
*Hock, L., Kowalsk, R. M., Hunter, E. (2012, March). The role of the actor-observer bias in attributions for obesity. Paper presented at the ACC Undergraduate Research Conference, Blacksburg, VA.
*Hock, L., Kowalski, R. M., Hunter, E. (2012, March). The role of actor-observer bias in attribution for obesity. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychologica Association, New Orleans, LA.
*Isgett, S., Kowalski, R., Lattanner, M., *Schroeder, A. & Giumetti, G. (2011, November). Cyberbullying among college students Prevalence rates and predictors. Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the Society for Southeastern Social Psychologists, Johnson City, TN.
*Isgett, S., Kowalski, R. M., Lattanner, M., *Schroeder, A. (2012, February). Cyberbullying among college students. Presented at the 58th Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, New Orleans, LA.
*Morgan, M., *Webb, M., *Stephens, J., *Turner, J., *Frazee, L., *Whittaker, E., *Martin, J., *Zaremba, B., *Newsome, B., *Bokman, A., Kowalski, R., *Baker, B. (2014, April). Redefining happiness: Is the happiness pie literature missing some slices? Poster presented at the Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Turner, J., *Morgan, M., *Webb, M., *Martin, J., *Frazee, L., *Stephens, J., *Zaremba, B., *Newsome, B., *Bokman, A., *Whittaker, E., Kowalski, R., *Baker, B. (2014, April). On the construction and sustainability of happiness: Where does my happiness come from? Poster presented at the Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Baker, B., Kowalski, R. M., *Morgan, M., *Webb, M., *Martin, J., *Frazee, L., *Turner, J., *Stephens, J., *Zaremba, B., *Newsome, B., *Bokman, A., *Whittaker, E. (2014). On the construction and sustainability of happiness: Where does my happiness come from? Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Nashville, TN.
*Baker, B., Kowalski, R. M., *Morgan, M., *Webb, M., *Stephens, J., *Turner, J., *Frazee, L., *Whittaker, E., *Martin, J., *Zaremba, B., *Newsome, B., *Bokman, A. (2014). Redefining happiness: Is the happiness pie literature missing some pieces? Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Nashville, TN.
*Whittaker, E.B., Kowalski, R. M. (2014) Cyber victimization: Categories, attitudes, and prevalence. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Nashville, TN.
*Whittaker, E.B., Kowalski, R. M. (2014). Cyberbullying: Victims, venues, attitudes, and prevalence. Paper to be presented at the ACC Undergraduate Research Conference, Pittsburgh, PA.
*Webb, M., *Stephens, J., *Martin, J., Kowalski, R. M. (2013). What makes you happy? Paper presented at the meeting of the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists, Augusta, GA.
*Morgan, M., *Frazee, L., *Turner, J., Kowalski, R. M. (2013). Defining happiness and joy. Paper presented at the meeting of the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists, Augusta, GA.
*Whittaker, E.B., Kowalski, R. M. (2013). Venue and subject of cyber aggression in social networking sites. Paper presented at the meeting of the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists, Augusta, GA.
Students presenting at the national meeting of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology.
NSF EAGER Grant Supplement
Incentive Award given by the office of Creative Inquiry
The students' poster won third place among judged posters at the annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Conference.
CAFLS Creative Inquiry Competition -- Zan Isgett -- 1st place -- Cyberbullying among college students Prevalence rates and predictors.
Whittaker, Elizabeth -- ACC-CIO award recipient.
*Toth, A., Kowalski, R. M., & *Webb, M. (in press). Bullying among boys with disabilities. In C. Kowalski (Ed.), Bullying.
Kowalski, R.M., Toth, A., & *Morgan, M. (2017). Bullying and cyberbullying in adulthood and the workplace. Journal of Social Psychology. 0:1-11. Doi:10.1080/00224545.2017.1302402
Kowalski, R. M., & Toth, A. (2017). Cyberbullying among youth with and without disabilities. Journal of Child and Adolescent Trauma. 10(4):1936-1521. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40653-017-0139-y
Dillon, E., Macbeth, J., Kowalski, R. M., *Whittaker, E., & Gilbert, J. (2016). Is this Cyber-bullying or Not?": Intertwining Computational Detection with Human Perception (A Case Study). In D. Nicholson (Ed.), Advances in human factors in cybersecurity: Proceedings of the AHFE 2016 international conference on human factors in cybersecurity. (pp. 337-346). New York, NY, Springer.
Kowalski, R.M., Morgan, M., & Taylor, K. (2017). Stigma of physical and psychological disabilities and the use of mobile technology. Journal of Social Psychology.
Toth, A., Kowalski, R. M., & Webb, M. (2016). Bullying among boys with disabilities. Psychology and Education Journal, 53, 34-39.
Kowalski, R. M., Morgan, C., *Drake-Lavelle, K., & Allison, B. (2016). Cyberbullying among college students with disabilities. Computers in Human Behavior, 57, 416-427. doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2015.12.044.
*Whittaker, E. B., & Kowalski, R. M. (2015). Cyberbullying. International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences (2nd. ed.). New York: Elsevier.
Kowalski, R. M., & *Whittaker, E. (2015). Cyberbullying: Prevalence, causes, and consequences. In L. D. Rosen, L. M. Carrier, & N. A. Cheever (Eds.), The handbook of psychology, technology, and society. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.
Kowalski, R. M., Morgan, C., *Drake-Lavelle, K., Allison, B. (2016). Cyberbullying among college students with disabilities. Computers in Human Behavior, 57, 416-427. 
Bradley, B. E., Dean, J., Kowalski, R. M. (2015). Hidden trauma, Quiet drama: The prominence and consequence of problematic grieving among college students. Journal of College Student Development, 56, 280-285.
Kowalski, R. M., Morgan, M. (2015). Cyberbullying in schools. In Sturmey, P. (Ed.), The Wiley handbook of violence and aggression: Societal interventions (Vol. 3). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
*Toth, A., Kowalski, R. M., Webb, M. (2015). Bullying among boys with disabilities. Psychology and Education Journal.
Kowalski, R. M., *Giumetti, G. W., *Schroeder, A. W., *Reese, H. H. (2012). Cyber bullying among college students: Evidence domains of college life. In C. Wankel & L. Wankel (Eds.), Misbehavior online in higher education (pp. 293-321). Bingley, UK: Emerald Publishing Group.
Kowalski, R. M., *Schroeder, A. N., *Smith, C. A. (2013). Bystanders and their willingness to intervene in cyberbullying situations. From cyberbullying to cyber safety: Issues and approaches in educational contexts.
Kowalski, R. M., *Baker, B., *Giumetti, G., *Turner, J., *Whittaker, E., *Frazee, L., *Stephens, J. (2014). Pet peeves and happiness: How do happy people complain? Journal of Social Psychology, 154, 1-5.
*Whittaker, E., Kowalski, R. M. (in press). Cyberbullying via social media. Journal of School Violence.
*Whittaker, E. B., Kowalski, R. M. (2015). "Cyberbullying." International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences (2nd.ed.). New York: Elsevier.
Kowalski, R. M., *Whittaker, E. (2014). "Cyberbullying: Prevalence, Causes, and Consequences." The Handbook of Psychology, Technology, and Society. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1579

Disposable Point-of Care Home Testing Platform for Metabolic Disease

Nonketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH) is a rare, pediatric metabolic disease caused by mutations resulting in the deficiency of the enzyme complex that breaks down the amino acid glycine. The resulting abnormally high levels of glycine in the body leads to severe medical issues starting in infancy, including uncontrollable seizures and problems with breathing. There are currently no tools available to monitor levels of glycine in patients while at home, which is necessary for drug and diet-mediated regulation of glycine levels in the body and preventing seizures. The objective of this CI is to develop a low-cost, disposable, stand-alone point-of-care diagnostic and monitoring system to enable caregivers of NKH patients to monitor glycine levels at home, adjust the patient’s drug treatment schedule, and improve the patient’s quality of life as well as clinical outcomes.

Team Leaders
Renee Cottle Bioengineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1629

DeepGreen: Modeling and Boosting Energy Efficiency on Liquid Immersion HPC Systems

This project aims to comprehensively understand the opportunities enabled by liquid immersion cooling, and explore its full potential to boost energy efficiency for high performance computing (HPC) under various thermal and power constraints. Improving energy efficiency, i.e., the ratio of performance to total power consumption, is crucial to sustain performance growth and realize exascale computing within 20 MW of power. HPC systems consume tremendous amounts of power for not only computing but also cooling to keep compute components within their thermal limits. In this project, we investigate liquid immersion HPC systems to optimize overall energy efficiency. we propose to develop machine learning models and system software to understand and optimize energy efficiency and reliability for workloads running on liquid immersion HPC systems. Our experimental platform is a Submer SmartPodX immersion cooling system.

Team Leaders
Rong Ge School of Computing
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
78

Testing Variables of Foods, Films, Antimicrobials and Surfaces Affecting Transfer and/or Survival of Bacteria

This team studies the transfer and survival of bacteria on various surfaces related to food. This team has tested numerous food-related surfaces and activities such as the 5-second rule, double-dipping and beer pong in the past. in the future we will investigate new topics related to food and bacteria such as transfer of bacteria by wiping table tops with cleaning  cloths, sanitation of bottles and cans and transfer of bacteria while sharing snacks.

Team Leaders
Paul Dawson Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
Accomplishments
Carrigg, G., Dookran, D., Ferguson, K., *Johnson, K., *Goodine, J., , *Hieronymus, B. *Whittington, Z., *Cannon, L., *Meza, C., Buyukyavuz, A., Dawson, P., Martinez-Dawson, R.(2019, April). Sanitation Level of Eating Surfaces and Transfer of Bacteria on Surfaces by Cleaning. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Nguyen, T., *Garrison,S., *Taylor, A., *Macinnis, M., *Kurtz, A., *Mattox, C., *Ellis, V., *Freeland, J., *Monitto, F., *Polte, K., *Suffern, M., *Thurmond, A., *Riggs, D., *Downs, R., *McClary, J. (2017, April). Bacterial transfer and survival on lemons. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Bartz, M., *Johnson, L., *Marvin, P., *Musselwhite, C., *Nicholson, A., *Randar, D., *Dawson, E., *Ritterpusch, M., Dawson, P. April 2015. Study of the transfer of microbes from hands to tongs. Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Session, Clemson, SC
Hessinger, A., Dawson, P. (2014, April). Does Salt Affect Milk Spoilage? Poster presented at the Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Gillespie, C., *Musselwhite, C., *Johnson, L., *Marvin, P., *Brown, S., and Dawson, P. (2014, April). Foam vs. Gel; Are These Soaps Foams Equal. Poster presented at the Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
Dawson, P., Inyee, H., Buyukyavuz, A., Aljeddawi, W. Martinez-Dawson, R., *Downs, R., *Riggs, D., *Mattox, C., *Kurtz, A., *MacInnis, M., *Freeland, J., *Garrison, S., *May, T., *McClary, J., *MonitTo, F., *Nguyen, T., *Polte, K., *Suffern, M., *Tanner, Z., *Thurmond, A., and *Ellis, V. (2017). Transfer of Escherichia coli to lemon slices and ice during handling. Journal of Food Research 6(4): 111-120. doi:10.5539/jfr.v6n4p111.
*Bartz, M., Buyukyavuz, A., *Dawson, E., *Diener, M., *Gates, R., Han, I., *Johnson, L., *Marvin, P., *Musselwhite, C., *Nicholson, A., *Randar, D., *Ritterpusch, M., *Zazzara, M., and Dawson, P.  (2016). Transfer of Escherichia coli while using Salad Tongs. Journal Of Food: Microbiology, Safety & Hygiene, 01(02). http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2476-2059.1000112
Baker, K.A., Han, I.Y., *Johnson, L., *Jones, E., *Knight, A., *MacNaughton, M., *Marvin, P., *Nolan, K., Martinez-Dawson, R., Dawson, P. (2015). Bacterial transfer from hands while eating popcorn. Food and Nutrition Sciences.  6(15), 1333–1338. https://doi.org/10.4236/fns.2015.615139
Dawson, P.L., Han, I., Bailey, C., Lynn, D., Martinez-Dawson, R. (2015). Bacterial transfer to beverages during drinking games (beer pong). International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Safety. 5(2): 151-161.
Alsallaiy, I.*, Dawson, P., Han, I., Martinez-Dawson, R. (2015, July). Recovery, Survival and Transfer of Bacteria on Restaurant Menus. Journal of Food Safety,
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
561

Relationship between Toxoplasma infection and immune responses in cancer development

Toxoplasmosis is a highly prevalent infectious disease among the human population. Approximately one third of the people on the earth carry such infections. The causing agent Toxoplasma gondii widely spreads in the environment. The primary Toxoplasma infections generally do not cause severe symptoms in healthy people owing to competent immunity; however, they can transit into latent infection and form the cysts within host’s brain by penetrating blood-brain barrier or muscle tissue. When the host experiences compromised immunity, such as cancer development, the cyst can be reactivated to cause severe even lethal situations. Moreover, a recent study has revealed that the infection of Toxoplasma can trigger a similar signaling pathway shared with cancer development. So far, many epidemiological studies have shown that the human population with cancer have higher Toxoplasma infection percentage than the healthy control group. These findings suggest a positive correlation between Toxoplasma infection with cancer occurrence, and the cancer patients are more vulnerable to primary toxoplasmosis than healthy individuals. It is obvious that the immune system plays a cretical role in the parasite infection and tumor development. However, the information about the immune regulation in Toxoplasma infection on tumor development is very limited. In this project, students will have the opportunities to investigate the relationship between Toxoplasma infection and the immune system on cancer development using most time in vitro assays.

Team Leaders
Yanzhang Wei Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Fogle, M., *Sulzbach, M., *Allison, H., *Smith, M., Wei, Y. (2019, April). Anti-cancer Effects of the Poha Plant and Vernonia cinerea Less Plant. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Ding,D., *Kouser, H., *Magrane, M., *Smith, MC., Yang, X. & Wei, Y. (2018, April 2-3) Anti-Inflammation, Anti-Cancer, and Antioxidant Effects of the Poha Plant. Presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Kouser, H., *Magrane, M., Smith, M.C., Yang, X. & Wei, Y. (2017) Anti-inflammation, Anti-cancer, and the Antioxidant Effects of the Poha Plant. Presented as CI Lab Report: Wei Lab 2017, Clemson, SC.
*Fox, A., *Cruse, K., *Polito, M., Wei, Y. (2016, April) CI Report. Presented at Dr. Wei's lab meeting.
Tietje, A., Yang, I., *Huggins, H., *Brierley, S., *Burns, A., *Shearer, A. (2015, April). Anti-tumor potential of compounds isolated from Physalis peruviana (poha). Poster presentation at Clemson University 10th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Borucki, R., *Blumer, A., *Huggins, H., Wei, Y., *Tietje, A., Yang, X. (2014, April). Compounds from fermented noni exudates (fNE) selectively kill human cancer cells. Poster presented at the Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
Youn, U., Park, E., Kondratyuk, T., Sang-Ngern, M., Wall, M., & Wei, Y., Pezzuto, J. M., and Chang, L. C. (2016). Anti-inflammatory and Quinone Reductase Inducing Compounds from Fermented Noni (Morinda citrifolia) Juice Exudates. Journal Of Natural Products, 79(6), 1508-1513. http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jnatprod.5b00970
College of ScienceG
150

Microbial ecology and bioinformatics

We know that microbes are the most abundant organisms on the planet and are found pretty much everywhere. However, we know very little about which microbes are present in different environments and what microbes are actually doing. The emphasis in our lab is to use genomics and transcriptomics of microbial communities combined with measuring environmental parameters in order to understand the global and local importance of microbes.

Team Leaders
Barbara Campbell Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*O'Boyle, B., *Zeaser, M., Campbell, B., *Hall, C., *Harris, A., *Katragadda, S., *Weber, E., Gholamian, J. (2019, April). The Effect of Environmental Factors on the Functional Potential and Activity of Microbes in the Chesapeake Bay and Delaware Bay. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Hall, C.N., *Harris, A.J., *Katragadda, S., *Weber, E.M., Patel, M.I. & Campbell, B.J. (2018 April 2-3) Environmental factors in the Delaware Bay affecting microbial composition and function. Presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Hall, C.N., *Harris, A.J., *Katragadda, S., *Weber, E.M., Patel, M.I. & Campbell, B.J. (2018 June 7-11) Understanding the effects of environmental factors on microbial activity and composition in the Delaware Bay. Presented at the ASM Microbe 2018, American Society for Microbiology, Atlanta, GA.
*Hall, C.N., *Harris, A.J., Hambright, A., *Katragadda, S., *Weber, E.M., Patel, M.I. & Campbell, B.J. (2017 September) Characterizing the Delaware Bay microbiome. Presented at the College of Science Undergraduate Research Showcase, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Hall, C.N., *Harris, A.J., *Katragadda, S., *Weber, E.M., Patel M.I. & Campbell B.J. (2018 March 10) Environmental factors in the Delaware Bay affecting microbial composition and function. Presented at the Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
Nachman, E., Lim, S.J. & Campbell, B.J.C. (2017). Quantifying the expression of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation in symbionts of the lucinid clam, Phacoides pectinatus. Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium. Clemson University, South Carolina (undergraduate student poster).
*Nachman E., Lim J., and Campbell B. (2017, March 25). Quantifying the expression of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation in symbionts of the lucinid clam Phacoides pectinatus. Poster presented at the biannual meeting of the South Carolina Branch of the American Society for Microbiology, Florence, SC.
*Katragadda S., *Weber E., Lim J, Weber R., and Campbell B. (2017, March 25). Feral Hog Fecal Source Tracking of Lake Keowee Tributaries. Poster presented at the biannual meeting of the South Carolina Branch of the American Society for Microbiology, Florence, SC.
Katragadda,S.*, Weber, E.*, Painter, J., Miller, K., and B. Campbell. (Fall 2016). Seasonal Trends in Host-Specific Bacteroidales Prevalence and Activity in Lake Keowee Tributaries. COS Research meeting.
*Love, K., *Seward, J., Miller, K.P., Kurtz, H., Henson, J.M. (2016, April 9). Assessment of the microbial soil community in two South Carolina peach orchards.  Poster presentation: South Carolina branch of the American Society of Microbiology, Charleston, SC.
*Erika Nachman, *Elijah Weber and *Suraj Katragadda won first place undergraduate poster award for their posters presented at the South Carolina Branch Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, Spring 2017 meeting in Florence, SC.
College of ScienceG
944

Perception & Action: Studies in Virtual Reality, Haptic Surgical Simulation, Robotics, and Affordances

Students will assist in conducting experimental research in one of a number of ongoing projects involving visual perception in virtual reality, touch and muscle perception in a laparoscopic surgery simulator, tele-operated robotics and/or the perception of “affordances.” Affordances are the things that can be done with the surfaces of the environment, such as whether an area on the floor is "step-over-able" or whether the width of a doorway is "pass-through-able." In a series of experiments we will investigate the accuracy of perceptual judgments pertaining to a variety of affordance behaviors, such stepping over, jumping over, passing through, whether or not an object is reachable, whether or not a short incline is stand-on-able, etc. 

Team Leaders
Christopher Pagano Psychology
Kathryn Lucaites Psychology
Balagopal Raveendranath
Hannah Solini Psychology
Accomplishments
*Weiss, B., *Reed, M., *Tota, J., *Lucaites, K., *Solini, H., Pagano, C. (2019, April). Gap Passability Judgments in a Dynamic Environment. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Lucaites, K. & Pagano, C. (2018, April 7). In search of a dynamics-based predictor of action capabilities. Poster presented at the Southeastern Human Factors Applied Research Conference, Clemson, SC.
*Wegner, H., Lucaites, K. & Pagano, C. (2018, April 2-3). Static and Dynamic Judgments of Aperture Passability in Novice Walker Users.Poster presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
Bhargava, A., Lucaites, K., Hartman, L.S., Solini, H., Bertrand, J., Robb, A., Pagano, C.C. & Babu, S. (2018, March 18-22). A Comparative Evaluation of Passability Judgments in Real and Immersive Virtual Environments. Poster presented at the IEEE Virtual Reality 2018 Conference, Reutlingen, Germany.
Pagano, C. C. (2017, April 14). "Perceiving Haptic Distance-To-Break in a Simulated Minimally Invasive Surgery Task." Illinois State University Department of Psychology & CBS Colloquium Series. Normal, IL.
*Wegner, H., Day, B., Hartman, L., Pagano, C. (2017, April). Investigating Avatar Transformations and Perception in Virtual Reality. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Day, B., Hartman, L., & Pagano, C. (2016, June 20-22). Facilitating performance through perception. Poster presented at the 2016 North American Meeting of the International Society for Ecological Psychology, Clemson, SC.
Day, B., Ebrahimi, E., Pagano, C. & Babu, S. (2016, March 19-23). Applied Perception Research Group, Clemson University. Demonstration at IEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2016, Greenville, SC.
Hartman, L.S., Day, B.M., Pagano, C.C., Kil, I. & Burg, T.C. (2015, July 15-18). Modality Effects in Training Haptic Distance-To-Break in a Simulated Minimally Invasive Surgery Task. Perception and Action XIII: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Perception and Action, 117-120, Minneapolis, MN.
Day, B., Hartman, L. S., Pagano, C. C. (2015, July). The Perceived Preferred Critical Boundary as an Example of Gibson's Margin of Safety. Poster presented at the Eighteenth International Conference on Perception and Action, Minneapolis, MN.
Day, B., Hartman, L. S., *Bryan, R., *Mask, R., *Goebel, A., Pagano, C. C. (2015, April). Is The Perceived Preferred Critical Boundary an Example of Gibson's Margin of Safety? Poster presented at Clemson GRADS research symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Bryan, R., *Mask, R., *Goebel, A., Day, B., Hartman, L., and Pagano, C.C. (2015, April). Perception of Gap Traversability and Safety of Actions. Poster presented at 10th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Pagano, C. C., Co-Investigator, “Investigating Perceptual-Motor Synchrony and Coordination on Cybersickness, Skills Training, and Spatial Perception in a VR Rowing Simulator.” Clemson Brooks Sports Sciences Institute, 1/17-12/17, $47,000, Sabarish Babu, PhD, principle investigator.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
118

Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-Chip for Point of Care Technology

In this Creative Inquiry project, we explore the use of electric and magnetic fields for the transport and control of biological and synthetic particles in engineered microchannels with lab-on-a-chip applications to chemistry and biomedicine for point of care technology. 

Team Leaders
Xiangchun Xuan Mechanical Engineering
Accomplishments
*Wolfersberger, A., *Zu, W., *Bulloch, L., *Baldwin, A., Malekanfard, A. & Xuan, X. (2019, April). Experimentally investigation of electrokinetic motion of particles (electrophoresis) in non-Newtonian fluids. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Li, D., *Walker, P., *Newcomer, M., *Zielinski, J., Kozubowski, L. & Xuan, X. (2017 October) "Morphology based continuous cell separation via elasto-inertial pinched flow fractionation," Presented at the MicroTAS 2017: The 21st International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, Savannah, GA.
*Brumme, C., *Shaw, R., Zhou, Y., Prabhakaran, R. & Xuan, X. (2016, March 14-18). "Joule heating effects on electrokinetic flow instabilities in ferrofluids." Presented at the APS March Meeting 2016, Baltimore, MD.
*Thomas, C., *Todd, A., Lu, X. & Xuan, X. (2016, March 14-18) "Lift-enhanced electrical pinched flow fractionation for particle and cell separation." Presented at the APS March Meeting 2016, Baltimore, MD.
*Thomas, C., *Todd, A., Lu, X. & Xuan, X., (2015, November 22-24). "Continuous-flow electrophoretic separation of particles with dissimilar charge-to-mass ratios via the wall-induced non-inertial lift." Presented at the 68th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics, Boston, MA.
*Thomas, C., *Todd, A., Lu, X. & Xuan, X. (2014, November 16-21). Selective concentration and separation of colloidal particles by positive reservoir-based dielectrophoresis (rDEP). Presented at the AICHE 2014 Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA.
Thanjavur, D., *Pasternak, S., Zhou, Y., Lu, X. & Xuan, X. (2014, November 16-21). Electrokinetic instabilities in ferrofluid flows. Presented at the AICHE 2014 Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA.
*Wilbanks, J., *Kiessling, G. A., Zeng, J., Chen, C., Vedantam, P., Tzeng, T. J. & Xuan, X. (2013, May 24-26). Diamagnetic particle and microbe concentration using ferromicrofluidics. Presented at the Annual meeting of Advances in Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN.
Zeng, J., *Wilbanks, J. J., Chen, C., Vedantam, P., Tzeng, T. J. & Xuan, X. (2013, May 24-26). Continuous size-based particle and cell separation in ferrofluid flow through a straight microchannel with two offset magnets. Presented at Advances in Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN.
Patel, S., *Showers, D., Vedantam, P., Tzeng, T., Qian, S., Xuan, X. (2012, November 18-20). Continuous-flow separation of live and dead yeasts using reservoir-based dielectrophoresis (rDEP). Presented at 65th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics, San Diego, CA.
*Johnson, M., *Anderson, R., Patel, S., Tzeng, T., Xuan, X. (2012, October). Microbe removal using reservoir-based dielectrophoresis (rDEP). Presented at the AICHE 2012 Annual Meeting, Pittsburg, PA.
*Wilbanks, J., *Kiessling, G., Zeng, J., Chen, C. & Xuan, X. (2012, October). Diamagnetic particle trapping in ferromicrofluidics. Presented at the AICHE 2012 Annual Meeting, Pittsburg, PA.
*Brown, V., *Zeng, J., Liang, L., Tzeng, J. & Xuan, X. (2012, March 3-6). Continuous Cell Concentration Using Ferrofluids. Presented at the ASME 2012 Micro/Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer International Conference, Atlanta, GA.
*Ibarra, E., *Keten, G., *Nieto, J., Church, C. & Xuan, X. (2009, November 8-13). Negative and positive dielectrophoresis of particles in curved microchannels. Presented at 2009 AICHE Annual Meeting, Nashville,TN.
*Showers, D., *Brown, V., et al. (2011, November 20-22). Dielectrophoretic Separation of Live and Dead Yeast Cells in Microfluidic Reservoirs. Presented at 64th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics, Baltimore, MD.
*Zeng, J. & Liang, L. (2011, November 20-22). Diamagnetic Cell Focusing in Ferrofluid Microchannel Flows. Presented at 64th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics, Baltimore, MD.
Liang, L., *Rivers, J. & Xuan, X. (2012, March 3-6). Continuous flow separation of magnetic and nonmagnetic particles in a ferrofluid. Presented at ASME 2012 Micro/Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer International Conference, Alanta, GA.
*Showers, D., Patel, S., Liang, L. & Xuan, X. (2012, March). Three-dimensional characterization of electrokinetic particle entry into microchannels. Presented at the ASME 2012 3rd Micro/Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer International Conference, Atlanta, GA.
DuBose, J., *Tupper, N., *Stonaker, J., Patel, S. & Xuan, X. (2013, November 24-26). Electrokinetic filtration and separation of particles by size in single-spiral microchannels. Presented at the 66th Annual Meeting of American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics, Pittsburgh, PA.
*Harrison, H., *Johnson, M., Patel, S. & Xuan, X. (2013, November 24-26). Electrical manipulation of submicron particles by reservoir-based dielectrophoresis (rDEP). Presented at the 66th Annual Meeting of American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics, Pittsburgh, PA.
Zhu, L., *Patel, S., *Johnson, M., Kale, A., Raval, Y., Tzeng, T., & Xuan, X. (2016). Enhanced Throughput for Electrokinetic Manipulation of Particles and Cells in a Stacked Microfluidic Device. Micromachines, 7(9), 156. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/mi7090156
*Thomas, C., Lu, X., *Todd, A., Raval, Y., Tzeng, T., Song, Y., Wang, J., Li, D., Xuan, X. Charge-based separation of particles and cells with similar sizes via the wall-induced electrical lift. ELECTROPHORESIS, 38(2), 320–326. https://doi.org/10.1002/elps.201600284
Harrison, H., Lu, X., Patel, S., *Thomas, C., *Todd, A., *Johnson, M., Raval, Y., Tzeng, T., Song, Y., Wang, J., Li, D., Xuan, X. (2015). Electrokinetic preconcentration of particles and cells in microfluidic reservoirs. The Analyst, 140(8), 2869–2875. https://doi.org/10.1039/c5an00105f
*Wilbanks, J. J., *Kiessling, G., Zeng, J., Zhang, C., Tzeng, T.-R., & Xuan, X. (2014). Exploiting magnetic asymmetry to concentrate diamagnetic particles in ferrofluid microflows. Journal of Applied Physics, 115(4), 44907. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4862965
Patel, S., *Showers, D., Vedantam, P., Tzeng, T., Qian, S., Xuan, X., (2012). Microfluidic separation of live and dead yeast cells using reservoir-based dielectrophoresis (rDEP). Biomicrofluidics, 6(3), 34102. http://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.4732800
Church, C., Zhu, J., *Nieto, J., *Keten, G., *Ibarra, E., Xuan, X. (2010). Continuous particle separation in a serpentine microchannel via negative and positive dielectrophoretic focusing. Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 20(6), 65011. https://doi.org/10.1088/0960-1317/20/6/065011
Zeng, J., Chen, C., Vedantam, P., *Brown, V., Tzeng, T.-R. J., & Xuan, X. (2012). Three-dimensional magnetic focusing of particles and cells in ferrofluid flow through a straight microchannel. Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 22(10), 105018. https://doi.org/10.1088/0960-1317/22/10/105018
Zhu, J., *Canter, R. C., *Keten, G., Vedantam, P., Tzeng, T.-R. J., & Xuan, X. (2011). Continuous-flow particle and cell separations in a serpentine microchannel via curvature-induced dielectrophoresis. Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, 11(6), 743–752. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10404-011-0839-9
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1614

Tool development for STEAM

The purpose of this Creative Inquiry project is to develop tools and activities for STEAM. We will develop tools for groups with varying expertise ranging from Kindergarten to College. The students will work in small interdisciplinary teams. The team will utilize different technologies including video creation, 3D printing, virtual reality, and tangibles. Depending on the background and interest of the team, the development of problem-based learning modules and/or case studies will also be explored. The initial focus will be on tool development for genetics and molecular biology. Longer term we will explore domain-specific content development across STEAM. 

Team Leaders
Miriam Konkel Genetics and Biochemistry
College of ScienceG
1456

Social Media Listening Center Digital Analytics

SMLC Digital Analytics CI: This CI will use the software associated with the Social Media Listening Center to monitor, listen and engage with social media for CU clients/partners, as well as complete weekly projects using social media analytics. Members of the CI, will have the opportunity to work collaboratively on assignments for companies, individually on personal assignments and gain a deeper understanding of leveraging analytics in the digital sphere. Members of the CI will refine their digital presence, contribute to collaborative projects, participate in webinars, and contribute to weekly analysis reports. 

Team Leaders
Amanda Moore Communications Studies
Accomplishments
Moore, A., *Crunk, A., *Douglass, M., *Middleton, E. (2019, April). Social Media Listening Center Digital Analytics. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
199

Meaningful work in medicine

This Creative Inquiry team will examine meaningful work as a buffer against the effects of stressors on emergency physicians, as well as determine interventions that should enhance meaningful work and therefore reduce stress and burnout. Students will gain experience in all phases of the research process.

Team Leaders
Thomas W. Britt Jr Psychology
Accomplishments
Jennings, K.S., Goguen, K.N., Britt, T.W., *Jeffirs, S.M., *Wilkes, J.R.,  *Brady, A.R., *Pittman, R.A., & *DiMuzio, D.J. (2017). The role of personality traits and barriers to mental health treatment seeking among college students. Psychological Services, 14(4), 513-523. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ser0000157
Goguen, K., Britt, T.W., Jennings, K., Sytine, A., *Jeffirs, S., *Peasley, P., *Zaremba, B., & *Palmer, J. (2016). Implicit and explicit attitudes toward mental health treatment. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 35, 45-63.
Britt, T.W., Sytine, A., *Brady, A., *Wilkes, R., *Pittman, R., Jennings, K.S., & Goguen, K. (2017). Enhancing the meaningfulness of work for astronauts on long duration space exploration missions. Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance, Volume 88, Number 8, August 2017, pp. 779-783(5)
Zinzow, H. M., Britt, T. W., Pury, C. L. S., Jennings, K., Cheung, J. H., & Raymond, M. A. (2015). Barriers and Facilitators of Mental Health Treatment-Seeking in U.S. Active Duty Soldiers With Sexual Assault Histories. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 28(4), 289–297. https://doi.org/10.1002/jts.22026
Gillispie, S. K., Britt, T. W., Burnette, C. M., & McFadden, A. C. (2016). Employee mental health treatment seeking: Perceptions of responsibility and resilience. Journal of Workplace Behavioral Health, 31(1), 1–18. https://doi.org/10.1080/15555240.2015.1100519
Jennings, K.S., Cheung, J.H., Britt, T.W., Goguen, K., *Jeffirs, S., *Peasley, A., *Lee, A. (2015). How are perceived stigma, self-stigma, and self-reliance related to treatment seeking? Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal (Special Issue: Self-Stigma and Mental Illness), 38, 109-116.
Britt, T.W., Pusilo, C., McKibben, E.S., Kelley, C., *Baker, A.N., Nielson, K.A. (2011). Personality and strength-related attitude dimensions: Between and within-person relationships. Journal of Research in Personality, 45, 586-596.
*Wilkes, J.R., *Brady, A.R., *Pittman, R.A., *Jennings, K.S., Sytine, A., Sawhney, G.. Goguen, K.N., Britt, T.W., *Jeffirs, S.M., & Sheridan, D. (2017, March). Meaningful work as a buffer against stressors facing astronauts. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Atlanta, GA.
Pittman, R., Jennings, K., Goguen, K., Britt, T., Jeffirs, S., Wilkes, R., *Brady, A., and *DiMuzio, D. (2017). Personality traits and barriers to treatment seeking among college students. Poster to be presented at the LXIII Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA), Atlanta, GA.
*Peasley, A., *Jeffirs, S., *Zaremba, B., *Lee, A., *Rivera, K., *Palmer, J., Goguen, K., Jennings, K., Britt Jr, T. (2014, April). Implicit and explicit stigma towards mental health treatment. Poster presented at the Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
(2015-2016). What to Tell a Soldier Who Hasn't Gotten Treatment [Video file]. Retrieved from: https://player.vimeo.com/video/184891179
(2015-2016). The Importance of Unit Support [Video File]. Retrieved from: https://player.vimeo.com/video/184891181
(2015-2016). Barriers Soldiers Face [Video File]. Retrieved from: https://player.vimeo.com/video/184891177
(2015-2016). The Benefits of Treatment [Video File]. Retrieved from: https://player.vimeo.com/video/184891180
(2015-2016). Mental Health Symptoms and the Need for Treatment [Video File]. Retrieved from: https://player.vimeo.com/video/184891180
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1085

Design, Development and Creative Uses of a Combined Optical Tweezer and Fluorescent Microscope

The team works on designing new functionality into an optical tweezer instrument to support a new, creative set of experiments.

Team Leaders
Joshua Alper Physics and Astronomy
Subash Godar Physics and Astronomy
Ashok Pabbathi Physics and Astronomy
College of ScienceG
211

Exploration of Weight Gain and Obesity in Adult Populations

This CI will introduce students to the need for programs addressing overweight and obesity in adult populations and how to create and implement effective interventions. A review of existing programs for diverse populations will be included in the literature review and hypothesis(es) generated to plan a intervention for a local population. Students will be trained in anthropometics and assessment measures such as blood pressure that often changes with weight gain. Students will plan and develop an educational intervention and learn/practice assessments Fall semester along with conducting a pilot assessment. The intervention component of the CI will occur Spring semester 2020 along with data collection, analysis, and write up plus presentation of the study results.

Team Leaders
Vivian J Haley-Zitlin Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
Accomplishments
Haley-Zitlin, V., Surapaneni, L., *Brodland, D., *Musarra, A., *Wiles, A., *Carney, S., *Challenger, E. (2012, April 22). An Obesity Prevention and Treatment Worksite Intervention by a Faculty Directed Student Research Team. Poster presented at the Experimental Biology meeting, San Diego, CA.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
212

A Nutrition Education & Life-Style Intervention for Type 2 Diabetes

This CI will introduce students to the incidence and prevalence of diabetes in SC, the US and worldwide as well as the resources available to individuals with diabetes locally. Existing programs addressing type 2 diabetes – prevention and treatment – will be researched and critiqued. An intervention specific for the population that we will work with will be created and implemented following a thorough literature review and hypothesis(es) generated which will facilitate development of an effective intervention for a local population. Students will be trained in anthropometrics and assessment measures such as finger sticks & glucometer use, physical assessments that are diabetes related such as skin changes, foot and eye changes. They will also learn how to assess HgA1C, breath and urine changes with uncontrolled diabetes in order to more effectively relate to and treat their clients. Blood pressure will also be monitored as cardiovascular changes occur with uncontrolled diabetes. Students will plan and develop an educational intervention and/or plan a media campaign and learn/practice assessments Fall semester along with conducting a pilot assessment. The intervention component of this CI will occur Spring semester 2020 along with data collection, analysis, and write up plus presentation of the study results.

Team Leaders
Vivian J Haley-Zitlin Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1638

Tiger Tea Kombucha

Tiger Tea is a data-driven product development project where students develop beverage formulations, design labels, execute human subjects research, and analyze data to iteratively improve delicious and nutritious kombucha for the marketplace.

Team Leaders
Rupert Hurley Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
Funan Jiang
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1615

An exploration of out-of-classroom experiences as they relate to students with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

In this creative inquiry project, our team will  explore common out-of-classroom experiences (museums, aquariums, historical settings)  in order to uncover how they accommodate students with autism, if at all. In order to learn about the various and unique needs of autistic students, we will read recent educational literature and will also be  surveying teachers and parents to gain an understanding of their informed perspectives. We will use this information to frame the research that we will conduct in museums, aquariums, and other academic attractions. As we progress through  our study, we will compile data from teachers, parents and museums in hopes to produce a resource that can be used by regional Special Educators. Below are several questions that we will focus on. How can students with autism best experience museums or other areas of interest as it pertains to classroom/school field trips?How do regional SpEd teachers make decisions about taking students with autism on field trips?Do regional museums try to accommodate learners who have autism? If so, how? What works best?

Team Leaders
Ryan Visser Education & Human Dev
College of EducationE
252

Molecular dissection of the spider silk self-assembly process

This Creative Inquiry group is studying the mechanism by which soluble spider silk proteins are assembled into a fiber. Understanding this process may provide insights that lead to the development of new biologically-inspired materials. 

Team Leaders
William R Marcotte Jr Genetics and Biochemistry
Accomplishments
*Glasshof, R., *Hudson, K., Marcotte Jr, W. (2019, April). Production of Recombinant Spider Dragline Proteins for Novel Materials Development. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Ortman, M.* (2014). An Assessment of the N-terminal Domain in the Spider Silk Assembly Process.
*Gravgaard, C., *McCartney, H., Peng, C. & Marcotte, W.R. (2012, March 4). Confirmation of Mini-spidroin Expression in Transgenic Tobacco. Presented at the American Society of Plant Biology, Myrtle Beach, SC.
Marcotte, B. (2011, October). Biochemical characterization of spidroin self-assembly. Presented at the annual meeting of the New Frontiers in Fiber Materials Science, Charleston, SC.
College of ScienceG
1617

Engineering nanobiomaterials for delivery of cancer therapy

Advances in cancer research together with advances in biomaterials and nanotechnology, have enabled the development of micro- nano-scaled drug delivery systems for cancer treatment. The goals of delivery systems for cancer treatment are (1) delivering cancer therapeutics efficiently to the tumor site, (2) enhancing uptake of therapeutics by tumor cells, and (3) minimizing non-specific uptake of therapeutics by healthy cells. The design of effective delivery systems for cancer therapies will require optimization of micro- or nano-based delivery systems, cell-specific targeting, and mechanisms for effective drug release. Targeted delivery may be enhanced by both active and passive targeting mechanism. Targeting moieties that bind to overexpressed receptors on malignant cells can be conjugated to particles to increase cell-specific uptake, thus enhancing the efficacy of treatment. Additionally, environmentally responsive polymers can be used to achieve efficient and/or controlled release of therapeutics under physiologic conditions. The goal of this CI is to develop innovative drug delivery systems to advance cancer treatment.

Team Leaders
Angela Alexander Bioengineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
300

PackExpo Exhibit Design, Build, Research

One of the largest trade exhibitions in the country is PackExpo. Join us as we represent Clemson University in a large booth that involves human subjects research with eye tracking and facial coding. Participate in designing, building, and managing a large event. Participate in the experimental design, execution, and analysis of human subjects research.  

Team Leaders
Rupert Hurley Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
Funan Jiang
Karan Dipani
Accomplishments
(confidential) Package of the Year Award - will be disclosed on 10/9/16.
Won first and second place in the Denesco competition 2012.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
359

Physical Activity Promotion and Research

The goal of our CI project is to examine and promote healthy eating and physical activity practices among children and families participating in an afterschool program in a low-income, predominantly Hispanic community. This project is funded, in part, by a 21st Century community Learning Center grant awarded to the elementary school we serve in Greenville, SC.

Team Leaders
Karen A Kemper Public Health Sciences
Accomplishments
*Davis, S., *Devaney, L., *Kryshak, V., *Lamb, S., *Reid, R., *White, K., *Woodard, R., Helsel, B., Kemper, K. (2019, April). Survey and interview data of parents of children in a low-income, predominantly Hispanic afterschool program. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Kemper, K., *Bossong, A., *Dundervill, K., *Huss, M., *Laporte, M. & *Passailaigue, L. (2016, April 20). Evaluation of the Greenville County Girls on the Run Program. Presented at the 2016 CBSHS Research forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
I received a sub-award from a 21st Century Community Learning Center grant awarded to Monaview Elementary School in Greenville County School. This sub-award is for $10,000 per year which funds a part-time graduate assistant to assist with the implementation of our project for the 21st Century grant. The graduate student assists me with training and mentoring the CI students to implement community engagement and research.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1036

Metabolism in the human parasite Entamoeba histolytica

Entamoeba histolytica is a human pathogen that causes dysentery in ~90 million people each year. This disease is spread through ingestion of contaminated water or food, primarily in developing countries in areas that lack adequate sanitation and/or are overcrowded. Entamoeba is found in the environment as a resistant cyst that is shed by an infected person. Ingested cysts will survive the harsh stomach environment to become the motile amoeba form in the small intestine. These amoebas then move to large intestine to colonize and new cysts can form to be shed to the environment to allow the infection process to continue. Entamoeba infection can be treated; however, only ~10% of those infected develop symptomatic disease. Thus, there may be between 500 million and 1 billion people who are asymptomatic carriers of the disease who may not be receiving treatment, leading to Entamoeba’s persistence in the environment. Our research investigates how Entamoeba grows and thrives in the human body. Entamoeba colonizes the large intestine, which is a nutrient-poor environment since most of the nutrients from the food we eat has already been absorbed in the small intestine. We are examining what other nutrients Entamoeba can use for growth and how it interacts with the large intestine and the bacteria present there. This research is expected to help us understand how colonization in the large intestine occurs and helps this disease persist.

Team Leaders
Cheryl Ingram-Smith Genetics and Biochemistry
Accomplishments
NIH COBRE grant. L. Temesvari (PI) and K. Smith (Co-I). This five-year $10.5M award designates the Eukaryotic Pathogens Innovation Center as a Center of Biomedical Research Excellence. I am one of five Target Investigators on this grant and provided one of the eight individual proposals that made up the final group proposal. My proposal is entitled "Energy metabolism in Entamoeba histolytica".
NIH R15 award 1R15GM114759-01A1 Entamoeba metabolism: the role of acetate kinase and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase Cheryl Ingram-Smith, PI 4/1/2016-3/31/2019 $423,966
*Diana Nguyen has been awarded an NIH Undergraduate Scholarship. This award provides a $20,000 scholarship for this year and a year-long paid research internship at the National Institutes of Health. This is one of just 16 awards nationwide.
Jones, C., *Khan, K., & Ingram-Smith, C. (2017). Investigating the mechanism of ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase from the protozoan parasiteEntamoeba histolytica. FEBS Letters, 591(4), 603-612. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/1873-3468.12573
*Khan, K., *Smith, N., Jones, C., Ingram-Smith, C. (2015, October 22-23). Investigating the mechanism of ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase in Entamoeba histolytica. Poster presentation at Cell Biology of Eukaryotic Pathogens Symposium, Clemson University, SC.
Jones, C., Khan, K., Ingram-Smith, C. (2015, April). Exploring the mechanism of acetyl-CoA synthetase (ADP-forming) from Entamoeba histolytica. Poster presentation at the Southeast Enzymes Conference, Atlanta, GA.
College of ScienceG
672

Finding Your Voice Camp

This Creative Inquiry group will be responsible for planning, marketing, and evaluating an all-girls weekend camp at the Clemson University Outdoor Lab. The purpose of the camp is to introduce middle school girls to nontraditional physical activities as well as to offer educational sessions on topics such as self-esteem, body image, and college life.  Research focused on the camp will address the following research questions:Does participation in a girls only camp impact middle school girls' body image?Does participation in outdoor recreation activities impact middle school girls' sense of physical self-efficacy?What are additional outcomes of participation in a girls only camp for middle school girls beyond potential impacts on body image and self-effiacy?

Team Leaders
Denise Anderson Parks Recreation & Tourism Mgt
Teresa Tucker Parks Recreation & Tourism Mgt
Alexsandra Dubin PRTM Leisure Skills
Accomplishments
*Beecher, K., *Bradfute, J., *Daniel, H., *Dorman, C., *Hayes, S., *Mandrgoc, S., *Moore, T., *Moosey, J., *Roberts, D., *Saverance, C., *Self, K., *Van Overeem, T., *Wallace, K., Anderson, D., *Dubin, A. (2019, April). Finding Your Voice: An Outdoor Recreation Camp for Girls. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Bedenbaugh, E., *Fleming, L., *Janson, R., *Johnson, A., *Mims, M., *Nance, M., *Oliver, B., *Sease, M., *Shuey, M., *Stapleton, O., *Watt, C., *Whitney, D., *Workman, M. (2017, April). The Impact of the Finding Your Voice Camp on Middle School Girls. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Partnerships with City of Clemson Parks and Recreation, Greenville County Recreation, Parks, and Tourism
To supplement the budget provided by CI, students were involved in fundraising efforts from external donors that to date have netted $2000 in additional funding necessary to offer the camp to participants free of charge.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
563

Investment Research Challenge

The CFA Research Challenge, organized by the CFA Institute and its member Societies, involves the valuation of a publicly traded company. Just like a Wall Street analyst would do for a research report, the team of students must come up with a one-year target price for the stock along with a Buy/Hold/Sell recommendation. The students must research the company, its industry, competitors, customers, and market trends to make assumptions that are used in a financial model projecting future performance. In this project, students develop teamwork, analytical, written and oral communication skills to write their report and present to a panel of investment professionals.

Team Leaders
Jack G. Wolf Finance
Accomplishments
The CFA Institute Research Challenge is a global competition which tests the analytic, valuation, report writing, and presentation skills of university students. The challenge comprises analysis of a publicly-traded company, mentoring by a professional research analyst, writing a research report, and presentation of research to a panel of experts. Over 4,000 students from over 865 universities in 70 countries participated in the 2015 Challenge and learned best practices in equity research from leading industry experts.
College of BusinessD
564

Certified Financial Analyst Seminar

The CFA charter is the most prestigious certification available in Finance and Investments. Although students can’t completely earn the charter while they are still in school, they can begin the process with the Level I exam. The CI group helps students prepare for the exam by having the students develop written study materials (which are uploaded to Canvas) and present these topics to the rest of the group. 

Team Leaders
Jack G. Wolf Finance
College of BusinessD
908

Experimental Cardiovascular System

In this project students will design and prototype a benchtop flow system which mimics realistic human cardiovascular physiology and anatomy. Such a system can be used for direct medical device testing and clinical training. The current phase of the project is designing a pressure-generating device for producing realistic blood pressure waveforms in an experimental system.

Team Leaders
Ethan Kung Mechanical Engineering
Ray Kean
Masoud Farahmand Mechanical Engineering
Accomplishments
*Kean, R., *Mahendranath, A., *Dale, J., *Farahmand, M., Kung, E. (2019, April). Low Resistance Actuated Valve for Cardiovascular Experiments. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Neely, K., *Danahy, R., *Capobianco, P., Shabanisamghabady, M., Farahmand, M., Kung, E. (2017 Oct 11-14) Design of an Actuated Pressure Waveform Generating Device for In-Vitro Cardiovascular Experiments. Presented at the Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting, Phoenix, AZ.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
332

Genetics and Autism

We are using zebrafish as a model system to test potential treatments for creatine deficiency syndrome. Creatine is a chemical needed for recycling of the energy molecule, ATP, in the brain. In creatine deficiency syndrome the creatine transporter needed to move creatine from the bloodstream into brain cells is mutated, preventing sufficient creatine from entering the brain. Brain cells rely on dietary creatine because they can only make small amounts of creatine through biochemical processes, not enough for normal function. People with creatine deficiency syndrome have intellectual disabilities and autism spectrum disorders. We are working to determine the ability of creatine like molecules to enter the brain without the need for a specific transporter.

Team Leaders
Susan Chapman Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Aldinger, J. & Chapman, S.C. (2018, April 2-3) Tbx1 mutation results in heart and ear defects in the tufted Araucana chicken. Presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Robinson, K., *Sullivan, M. K., Anderson, A., Wetzler, M., and Chapman, S. (2017, May 18-20). "N-Modified Creatine as a Treatment for SLC6A8-Related Autism Spectrum Disorders." Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Southeast Regional Society for Developmental Biology, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA.
*Bernstein, R., Freese, N., *Denney, H., and Chapman, S. (2013, January). Araucana chicken as a model for DiGeorge Syndrome. Presented at Opening of the Life Sciences Building, Clemson University, SC.
Scott, A., Freese, N., and Chapman, S. (2013, March). "Araucana chicken as a model for DiGeorge Syndrome". Presented at 8th Annual ACC Meeting of the Minds Conference. Wake Forest University, NC.
Ray, P., Sharif, M.*, Chapman, S. (2016, May 19-21). Lectins differentially label tissues in the embryonic chicken head. Southeast Regional Society for Developmental Biology, Whitney Marine Laboratory, FL.
Ray, P., Hughes, A.L., *Sharif, M., Chapman, S.C. (2015, December). Lectin staining selectively labels tissues within the embryonic chicken head. Anatomical Society Winter Meeting. Magdelene College, Cambridge, UK.
NIH R03: SLC6A8 mutant zebrafish as a high throughput screening tool to identify candidate therapeutics of Creatine Deficiency Syndrome. 
1R03MH115354-01 NIH 2 years 2017-2019 $150,000 SLC6A8 mutant zebrafish as a high throughput screening tool to identify candidate therapeutics of Creatine Deficiency Syndrome
A NIH R03 grant proposal was submitted based on this work In October 2015 - Funded from August 2016-July 2018.
NIH R03: Structural analysis of Creatine and its role as a GABA A Receptor neuromodulator. Creatine (Cr) transporter deficiency syndrome affects approximately 1 million people, resulting in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and X-linked intellectual disability (XLID). SLC6A8 codes for the Cr transporter, without which Cr cannot pass the blood-brain barrier, or enter neuronal cells, thus hindering ATP production and metabolic activity in the brain. The neuropathology of Creatine deficiency syndrome is not fully understood. We propose that Creatine is a novel neuromodulator and GABA antagonist at GABA A receptors.
NIH R03 2016-2018 5th Percentile, awaiting award notification.
5 Students received a Calhoun Honors Undergraduate Research Award for their project: Genetics and Autism - Spring 2017
2 Students received a Calhoun Honors Undergraduate Research Award for their project: Genetics and Autism research - Spring 2018
4 Students received a Calhoun Honors Undergraduate Research Award for their project: Genetics and Autism research - Fall 2017
5 Students received a Calhoun Honors Undergraduate Research Award for their project: Genetics and Autism - Fall 2016
2 Students received a Calhoun Honors Undergraduate Research Award for their project: Genetics and Autism in Spring 2016.
3 Students received Calhoun Honors Undergraduate Research Awards for their project: Genetics and Autism in Fall 2015.
Ray, P., Hughes, A., Sharif, M., & Chapman, S. (2016). Lectins selectively label cartilage condensations and the otic neuroepithelium within the embryonic chicken head. Journal Of Anatomy, 230(3), 424-434. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joa.12565
College of ScienceG
336

Applications of Geographic and Soil Information Systems

Soil is a critical component of land use planning and the objective of this project is to study and understand the properties of soils in relation to current and future use.  Individual student projects focus on evaluating the soil resources using soil sampling and testing, Web Soil Survey databases, as well as GIS and statistical software in relation to current or future land use plans.  Students are able to select an area of interest and perform a comprehensive assessment of soil resources in relation to potential real estate, agricultural, or forestry application.

Team Leaders
Elena Mikhailova Forestry & Environment Conserv
Christopher Post Forestry & Environment Conserv
Accomplishments
*Andres, S., *Fox, W., *Pearson, A., Mikhailova, E., Post, C. (2019, April). Soil Inventory of Private Lands in South Carolina. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Mikhailova, E.A., Post, C., *Green, A., *Kneece, R., *Murphy, H., *Padgett, A., Rogers, T., and Tisdale, E. (2017, April 3-4). Soil Inventory of Private Lands. Presented at the 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Brown, M., *Buckfelder, E., *Donohue, R., *Duffy, K., *Dukart, Y., *Lister, V., *McNeely, K., *Moore, F., *Williams, G., Mikhailova, E., Post, C., Sharp, J. (2016, April). Soil Inventory of Private Lands in South Carolina. Presented at FoCI, Clemson University, SC.
*Bryant, S.J., Mikhailova, E.A., Post, C.J. & Sharp, J.L. (2011, April). Soil Inventory of HWY 9 West, Wallace, SC. Presented at the Natural Resources Student Research Symposium, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Green, L., Mikhailova, E., Post, C.J. & Sharp, J. (2011). Soil Inventory of Two Residential Properties in Columbia, SC. Presented at the Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) 26th Annual Career Fair and Training Conference, Overland Park, KS.
Mikhailova, E.A., Tennant, C.H, Post, C.J., Cicimurri, C. & Cicimurri, D. (2009, November 1-5). Geology Museum based learning in Soil Science Education. Presented at the GSA-ASA-CSSA-SSSA-GCAGS-HGS Joint Annual Meeting in Pittsburgh, PA.
*Vereen, M., Mikhailova, E.A., Post, C.J & Sharp, J.L. (2011, April). Soil Inventory of a Residential Plot in Little River, SC. Presented at the Natural Resources Student Research Symposium, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
Werts, J.D., Mikhailova, E.A. & Ring, G. (2009, November 1-5). Introductory Soil Science Artifact for Student ePortfolios. In Annual meetings abstracts CD-ROM . Presented at the GSA-ASA-CSSA-SSSA-GCAGS-HGS Joint Annual Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA.
*Green, L., Mikhailova, E., Post, C.J. & Sharp, J. (2011, April). Soil Inventory of Two Residential Properties in Columbia, SC. Presented at the Natural Resources Student Research Symposium, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Capps, J., Mikhailova, E. (2014, April). Soil inventory of Capps Forestland, Westminster, SC. Poster presented at the Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
Mikhailova, E.A., Post, C.J., Sharp, J.L., Speziale, B. J. (2015). Creative Inquiry in Soil Science: Soil inventory of private lands. Technical Contribution No. 6357 of the Clemson University Experiment Station. Nat. Sci. Educ. 44(1):1-8.
Mikhailova, E.A., Post, C.J., Koppenheffer, A., Asbill, J. (2009). Celebrating the Smithsonian Soils Exhibit in the classroom with the State/Representative Soil Project. J. Nat. Resour. Life Sci. Educ., 38, 128-132.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
347

Tackling Social Issues: Advanced Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research in Applied Ethics And Ethical Debate

Critical examination of ethical cases largely taken from up-to-date newspaper and magazine publications.  Anticipation of critical questions that might be asked about the cases.  Research and development of responses to these questions and the best ethical resolution of the cases.  These responses are first developed in writing, and then are presented orally in a competitive debate-like format. Oral responses will be presented at the regional competition and, if chosen, at the national conference of the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics.

Team Leaders
David Antonini Philosophy and Religion
Kelly Smith Philosophy and Religion
Stephen Satris Philosophy and Religion
Accomplishments
Competed at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Ethics Bowl Competition that was held in Fall 2015 at Clemson University.
Won the Mid-Atlantic Regional Ethics Bowl, November 2011. Placed second in nation at National Undergraduate Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl competition, March 2012.
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
1464

German-English Translations�Strategies, Techniques, and Technologies

This CI projects introduces students to translating documents from English to German and vice versa. Students will draft translations and discuss them in facilitated, German conversation; teams peer-review and improve translations; and various approaches and techniques for translating documents will be tested. Possible research questions include cost and speed of external translation services, current industry need, in-house versus outsourcing of translation services, size of translation teams, investigation of translation tools, and the effectiveness and feasibility of technology in German translation.

Team Leaders
Johannes Schmidt Languages
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
1444

Cultural Dimensions of GHS Academic Health Center

GHS has invited us to co-investigate the student culture of their Academic Health Center during spring semester 2019. Students will have an incredible opportunity to conduct ethnographic interviews and observations with students from several programs at GHS, analyze the resulting qualitative data, and contribute to a publishable report for Academic Medicine. (Note: the IRB number is from GHS IRB).

Team Leaders
Melissa Vogel Sociology and Anthropology
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
351

Ice Cream Innovation

An exploration of new and novel techniques to advancing innovation in ice cream and frozen desserts.  Growth of the Ice Cream and Frozen Dessert industry is dependent on innovation.  This team of students is focused on exploring new flavorings and inclusions that could lead to a heightened eating experience for consumers that love Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts and expand the appeal of these products to individuals that rarely consumer Ice Cream or Frozen Desserts.

Team Leaders
John U. McGregor Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
Accomplishments
*Sam Lopane received the International Dairy Industries Joe Larson Leadership Award which is given to the student that has demonstrated the greatest leadership potential. This is our industry's version of the Heisman Trophy.
A three person team competed in the Collegiate Dairy Products Evaluation Contest against other universities from Canada and the US. Clemson placed 2nd overall with numerous top 3 individual and team awards.
A member of our team, Kinsey MacDonald*, received the Joe Larson Leadership Award at the National Collegiate Dairy Products Evaluation Competition that was held in Chicago, IL at the International Dairy and Foods Processing Expo.� This prestigious award recognizes the student that demonstrates the greatest potential for being a future leader of the Food Manufacturing Industry. Clemson's team of students finished 2nd overall in the National Collegiate Dairy Products Evaluation Competition.� The competition was established in 1916 and is recognized by the Food Manufacturing Industry as a key opportunity to identify the future leaders of the world's largest manufacturing industry and the institutions they represent.� This is the third time in the past 6 years that one of our CI team members has won this prestigious International Leadership Award.
Clemson's team of students finished 2nd overall in the National Collegiate Dairy Products Evaluation Competition that was held in Chicago, IL at the International Dairy and Foods Processing Expo. The competition was established in 1916 and is recognized by the Food Manufacturing Industry as a key opportunity to identify the future leaders of the world's largest manufacturing industry and the institutions they represent. This group of students were outstanding representatives for Clemson at this prestigious meeting of internationally recognized business and industry leaders.
*Lopane, S. & *Gaidousek, E. (2016). "Development of an Ice Cream Innovation Lab Tour". Presented to selected representatives for the State of South Carolina, Clemson, SC.
McGregor, J.U. (2009, February). Food Science - Real Time Examples for the Classroom. Presented at the 2009 Foodservice Educators Learning Community Summit, Charleston, SC.
McGregor, J.U. (2009, February). Culinary Science Creative Inquiry. Presented at the 2009 Foodservice Educators Learning Community Summit, Charleston, SC.
Presi Presentation for the Ice Cream Innovation Lab.  Created in collaboration with the Ingredient Applications Team.
3D Rendered Model of Ice Cream Innovation Lab Renovation Design
3D Rendered Model of Ice Cream Processing Lab Renovation Design
Carr Family Creative Inquiry Endowment
$2,400 Received from the National Dairy Shrine
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
608

Human Factors Safety Research

This project is a continuing series of studies involving the assessment of factors impacting safety and performance in real world situations.  Principles of perception, conspicuity, and hazard identification will be applied in experiments assessing, for example, trips, falls, and similar incidents in both real-world and laboratory environments.

Team Leaders
Benjamin R Stephens Psychology
Accomplishments
*Lawerence, M., *Stiltner, K.A., *Seay, A., *Burriss, T., *Hearn, S.P., *Serwat, M., *Cooper, H. & Stephens, B.R. (2018, April 2-3) The Effect of Illumination and Texting on Judgments of Trip Hazards. Poster presentation at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Bartholomew, Z., *Kirstein, S., *Seay, A., *Sicilia, N., *Stiltner, K.A., *Taffer, A., Stephens, B. (2016, March). Trip Hazard Assessment: A Survey Method. FOCI, Clemson.
*Sicilia, N., *Bartholomew, Z., *Taffer, A., *Angeloff, G., *Hawk, S., *Pickens, E., *Scott, M., Stephens, B. (2016, April). Two techniques for conspicuity assessment. Southeastern Psychological Association, New Orleans.
*Bartholomew, Z., *Bensch, A., *Boyd, R., *Grossman,  A., *Kirstein, S., *Sicilia, N., *Taffer, A., Stephens, B. (2016, March). Trip Hazard Assessment: A Survey Method.  Poster presented at the meetings of the Southeastern Psychological Association, New Orleans.
*Sicilia, N., *Bartholomew, Z., *Taffer, A., *Angeloff, G., *Hawk, S., *Pickens, E., *Scott, M., Stephens, B. (2016, March). Two Techniques for Conspicuity Assessment. Poster presented at the meetings of the Southeastern Psychological Association, New Orleans.  
*Angeloff, G., *Sicilia, N., *Scott, S., *Hawk, S., *Bartholomew, Z., *Pickens, E., *Taffer, A., Stephens, B. (2015) Detection and Identification Conspicuity. Presented at FOCI, Clemson.
Pacek, M.*, Angeloff, G.*, Scott, M.*, Solesbee, H.*, Stephens, B. (2015). Identification and Detection Conspicuity Measurement. Presented at SEPA, Hilton Head.
*Angeloff, G., *Ramsey, A., *Glaze, K., *Pacek, M., *Myers, B., Stephens, B. (2014, March 5). Attention and Search Conspicuity for Skylight Fall Hazards. Presented at SEPA, Nashville.
Stephens, B.R., Stephens, J.T., Pearl, G.S., *Ramsey, A., *Angeloff, G., *Glaze, K., Thames, Z. (2013). "An Efficient Method to Evaluate Skylight Hazard Conspicuity." Presented at Annual Meetings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, San Diego, CA.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
625

Host-Microbe Interactions in the Gastrointestinal Tract

This research project will focus on various aspects of interactions between the normal (non-pathogenic) bacterial members of the human gastrointestinal tract and their human hosts.  The overarching focus is to identify conserved functions within particular groups of microbes that can be targeted with small organic molecules.  The goal is to identify potential new therapeutics that could be used to modify the gastrointestinal microbiome in a targeted fashion.  The current research is focused on investigating the possible involvement of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (and related species) in the development and/or exacerbation of diabetes and obesity.

Team Leaders
Kristi Whitehead Biological Sciences
Daniel Whitehead Chemistry
Accomplishments
*Armstrong, D., *Austin, R., *Cabezas, J., Whitehead, K., Whitehead, D., *Scott, B., *Palmentiero, M., *Petersen, D. (2019, April). Targeted inhibition of clinically relevant Bacteroides dorei.. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Whitehead, K. (2018 April 14). "Small Molecule Manipulation of the Bacteroides Starch Utilization System." Presented at the 2018 Annual SC ASM Branch Meeting, Rock Hill, SC. 
*Austin, R., *Bilodeau, M., *Scott, B., Spier Camposano, E., *Floyd, M., *Patel, N., *Owen, H., *Peters, E., Santilli, A., Whitehead, D. & Whitehead, K. (2018, April 2-3). Investigation into Targeted Manipulation of the Gastrointestinal Microbiota Through Disruption of Starch Utilization Systems. Poster presentation at Clemson University 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Dawson, E., *Owen, H., *Peters, E., *Floyd, M., Whitehead, K., Whitehead, D., *Santilli, A., *Patel, N. (2017, April). Inhibiting the Starch Utilization System of Bacteroides spp. as a Therapeutic Target for Type 1 Diabetes. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Bryant, H., *Stein, N., *Patel, N., Santilli, A., Tackeberry, K., Whitehead, D., Whitehead, K. (2016). Modulation of Bacteroidetes polysaccharide metabolism by small organic molecules as a potential therapeutic for Type 1 Diabetes. Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Session. Clemson University.
*Patel, N., *Bryant, H., Tackeberry, K., *Stein, N., Santilli, A., Whitehead, D., Whitehead, K. (2016, April 6-7). Investigation of inhibition of members of the gastrointestinal microbiota to prevent or delay the onset of Type 1 diabetes. Presented at the 11th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
We received an additional $10,000 supplement from JDRF (Junvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) to continue analysis of the results from our animal study. Two CI undergraduates will be working on aspects of this project this summer and into the Fall
$50,000 grant awarded by the Juvenille Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). This award was based solely from preliminary data generated by Creative Inquiry students. The grant include money to conduct a preliminary animal study that could greatly further our project.
Non-lethal small molecule inhibition of polysaccharide metabolism in human gut microbes: a potential therapeutic avenue. Submitted to the Journal of Chemical Biology.
College of ScienceG
880

Microbes All Around Us

Microbes are all around us. They are in the air we breathe, the water we drink, the soil we walk on, the food we eat; they are even in and on us. Although this fact is generally acknowledged, we don’t always have a great appreciation for the roles these microbes play in our health.  Antimicrobial resistance for pathogens is clearly becoming a bigger and bigger problem, but there is also the potential for some classically non-pathogenic organisms to cause issues. This Creative Inquiry project will focus on investigating a variety of bacteria with various impacts on humans. We will use hypotheses generated by the student investigators’ natural curiosity or recent news stories as the driving force behind our experiments. This CI has investigated topics such as microbial contamination of lab coats during General Microbiology teaching labs and the potential for magazines in physician's waiting rooms to serve as sources of infection.  We have also investigated the antimicrobial activity of various novel compounds with collaborators in the Department of Chemistry. 

Team Leaders
Kristi Whitehead Biological Sciences
Krista R Rudolph Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Conti, A., *Gamble, L., *Glasshof, R., Whitehead, K., Rudolph, K., *Reeves, H., *Kerr, C., *Jones, K. (2019, April). Interactions of Lactobacillus in the Gastrointestinal Tract of the Human Body. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Conti, A., *Connolly, K., *Maddie B., *Marhefka, C., *Speers, R., Santilli, A., Rudolph, K., Whitehead, D., and Whitehead, K. (2018, April 2-3). Anti-Microbial Evaluation of Synthetic Nanoparticles and Small Molecules. Poster presentation at Clemson University 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Connolly, K., *Macomson, J., Whitehead, K., Rudolph, K., *Santilli, A., *Whitehead, D. (2017, April). Antimicrobial Effect of Volatile Organic Compound Capturing Nanoparticles. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Migliore, M., *Scott, M., *Ramey, T., Abercrombie, J., Rudolph, K., Whitehead, K. (2016). Assessment of microbial diversity on surfaces located around a college campus. Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Session. Clemson University.
*Ramey, T., *Scott, M., *Migliore, M., Rudolph, K., Whitehead, K. (2016, April). Investigation of the presence and impact of bacterial pathogens around campus. Presented at FoCI 2016, Clemson University, SC.
"Anti-Microbial Nanomaterials for Rendering Applications". 33% Contributor. Sponsor: Fats & Proteins Research Foundation, Inc., Clemson University Animal Co-Products. 6/1/16 to 7/1/17. $49,500 awarded. The majority of this funding went towards development of the nanomaterials; we received a small amount for antimicrobial testing.
College of ScienceG
1581

Building an Academic Dashboard

Many students don’t realize that there are multiple degree paths to most careers, especially in engineering.  As part of an NSF-funded project, students on this Creative Inquiry team will help design and develop a prototype “Academic Dashboard” to help put students in the driver’s seat of their education.  The dashboard will include information about major choice and activities to develop and track adaptive decision-making skills.  The project will focus on two main tasks: 1) designing the dashboard structure, and 2) modeling academic pathways in engineering.  The purpose of modeling academic pathways using longitudinal data is to identify indicators of “overpersistence” and alternative strategic pathways.  This information will be incorporated into the dashboard to help students make informed decisions about their path forward.  

Team Leaders
Marisa Orr Engineering & Science Educatio
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1587

Evaluation of forage production and quality for livestock production systems in the southeastern United States

A major challenge for producers in cool-season grass systems like tall fescue is the quantity and quality gap of forage production that usually occurs during mid through late summer. Warm season annuals can complement perennial cool-season systems and extend production during this critical summer months. High level of nitrogen fertilization are usually required to maximize summer annual grasses production, but  summer annual legumes have the potential to provide high forage quality and fix atmospheric N that will reduce fertilizer cost. In recent years, stored forage in the form of baleage has become more popular in the southeast. Legumes-grasses might present some challenges for a proper ensiling process due to the commonly lower sugar concentration in the resultant forage. Thus, evaluating the impact of the ensiling process of this forage mixes is warranted in order to generate producer’s adoption of these forage sources.Although alfalfa has been grown in the Southeastern USA since the late 1800’s, it has not attained the status in this region as in other parts of the nation mainly due to problems with alfalfa weevil and an abundant supply of inexpensive nitrogen fertilizer that reduced the need for leguminous crops to boost soil fertility. However, the cost of fertilizers has risen and modern well-adapted and pest-resistant alfalfa varieties are available in the market. Information about productivity and management of alfalfa, generated locally, is needed in order to demonstrate, educate, and ultimately re-introduce and advance the utilization of alfalfa as part of diverse forage systems and crop rotations for livestock farms in the Southeast USA. The goals of this project are to evaluate: 1. How summer annual grasses alone or in mixtures with annual legumes affects yield and nutritional value of fresh and ensiled forage. 2. The impact of growing new alfalfa varieties on plant persistency, forage yield and quality.

Team Leaders
Matias Aguerre Animal & Veterinary Sciences
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
632

Engineering Microbes and Proteins as Biosensors

This CI is about engineering proteins, nucleic acids, and cells to act as biosensors reporting on the environment. Application in health, sustainability, and national defense are explored. 

Team Leaders
Mark Blenner Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Accomplishments
*Hutter, S., *Martin, C., *Norris, L., *Kindervater, D., Wintenberg, M., Hilbert, M. & Blenner, M. (2019, April). Using bacteria for engineering better biosensors.. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Blenner, M. (2016, Novemeber). "Microbial Production of Value Added Chemicals and Opportunities for Creating New Markets for Biomass." Invited presentation to the South Carolina Biomass Council, Clemson, SC.
*Arvay, E., Yaguchi, A., & Blenner, M. (2016, October). "Improvements to microbial biodiesel production through dynamic regulation." Poster presented at Southeastern Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Columbia, SC.
Dassetty, S., Wang, W., Blenner, M., & Sarupria, S. (2016, November). "Understanding the Structural Differences Between Psychrophilic and Thermophilic Enzymes: A Molecular Dynamics Study." Presented at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA.
Wang, W., Dassetty, S., Sarupria, S., & Blenner, M. (2016, November). "Improving the Activity of a Thermophilic Lipase By Increasing the Flexibility Proximal to the Active Site." Presented at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA.
Yaguchi, A., *Arvay, E., Rodriguez, G., & Blenner, M. (2016, November). "Improving Dynamic Regulation of Biodiesel Production in E. coli." Poster presented at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA.
Yaguchi, A., Cook. T., Blenner, M. (2016, November). "Using Phage-Assisted Continuous Evolution to Develop Novel Biosensors." Poster presentation at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA.
Dassetty, S., Wang, W., Blenner, M., & Sarupria, S. (2017, February). "Engineering Robust Activity in Extremophilic Enzymes: A Molecular Dynamics Study." Poster presented at the Clemson Biological Sciences Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
Wang, W., Dassetty, S., Sarupria, S., & Blenner, M. (2017, April). "Engineering Enzymes For Broad Temperature Range Applications Through Active Site Flexibility." Presented at the American Chemical Society Meeting, San Francisco, CA.
*Arvay, E. *Barrett, R., *Burkes, K., *Karp, T., *Rumph, M., *Yu, T., Blenner, M. (2016, April). Engineering Bacterial Systems for Renewable Chemicals and Biosensors. Poster presented at the FoCI Conference, Clemson, SC.
*Arvay, E., Yaguchi, A., Rodriguez, G., Wilson, A., Blenner, M. (2016, April). Improving the Dynamic Control of Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester Production. Poster presented at the Southeast Regional American Institute of Chemical Engineers Meeting, Tuscaloosa, AL.
*Arvay, E., Yaguchi, A., Rodriguez, G., Wilson, A., Blenner, M. (2016, March). Improving the Dynamic Control of Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester Production. Poster presented at the American Chemical Society Meeting, San Diego, CA
*Campbell, H., *Fowler, J., *Gambill, L., *Hume, P., *Knowles, S., *Hussain, M., Blenner, M. (2015, April) Engineering Yarrowia lipolytica for renewable fuels and chemicals from lignocellulose and waste feedstocks. Poster presentation at Clemson University 10th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Arvay, E., *Kessler, C., and Blenner, M. (2015, April). Dynamic Regulation and Metabolic Engineering of Total Biodiesel Production in E. coli. Poster presentation at Clemson University 10th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Jessica Zielinski, Goldwater Scholarship Winner
*Erika Arvay, NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program – Honorable Mention
ACCIAC Creativity & Innovation Fellowship to *Erika Arvay, 2016
NASA SC Space Grant Undergraduate Research Fellowship to *Erika Arvay, 2016
Awarded to Taylor Cook* and Joseph Redzikowski* for projects related to Synthetic Biology for Space Exploration. Taylor's work focuses on developing protein-based sensors, and Joe's project focuses on biosynthesis of lubricating oils.
“Discriminatory Transcriptional Response of Environmental Microorganisms to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation” Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Co-Principal Investigator $1,480,460 ($709,959), (2017-2022).
3 Year NSF Grant (2015-2018). Synthetic biology can help meet growing demand for sustainable advanced biofuels. Complex pathways for the total synthesis of biofuels are routinely expressed in microbial systems. This project seeks to improve the production of biodiesel in an engineered strain of bacteria by optimizing how renewable substrates are utilized through the use of protein-based metabolite sensors and enzymes with appropriate properties. An additional aim of the project is use this feedback control to make pathways more robust in their ability to maintain high production rates in spite of changing environmental or process conditions. The results of this project may also apply to other metabolic pathways that produce sustainable fuels and chemicals, allowing translation of biotechnologies from the lab to industry with more certainty and fewer complications. The research performed will be the focal point of our efforts to engage women potentially interested in STEM careers, in the state of South Carolina. We aim to integrate education and research by providing training opportunities for students already in STEM, and local outreach to young women who might become more interested in STEM. Finally, this research will be integrated into a new elective course on protein and metabolic engineering offered at Clemson University. This project uses simple unsteady-state kinetic models to rationalize protein engineering and synthetic biology based improvements to E. coli biodiesel production. Modeling suggests inefficiency due to pathway imbalance. Better flux distributions can be achieved through simple genetic and protein engineering efforts. Enzymes with catalytic efficiencies predicted to improve biodiesel production will be used. Critical enzymes will be engineered using directed evolution to relieve pathway bottlenecks. Protein-level feedback control will be engineered and combined with genetic level feedback control to allow pathway fluxes to remain high in spite of short and long time-scale metabolic perturbations. The combination of genetic and protein-level dynamic control will allow biofuel and other chemical producing systems to withstand perturbations from environmental variation and scale-up conditions without suffering large losses in yield and efficiency. The results of this project may lead to more general methods for balancing pathways that does not rely on explicit kinetic or flux data.
AFOSR YIP: 3 Year Grant (2015-2018). Thermostable enzymes from thermophilic extremophiles allow prolonged use of these biocatalysts; however, their activity is greatly compromised at lower temperatures encountered in the environment and physiological systems. Psychrophilic enzymes have evolved more efficient catalytic mechanisms to act efficiently at cold temperatures, but are typically unstable at higher temperatures or over extended times. The combination of these properties would result in enzymes that are highly thermostable and optimally active across a broad temperature range. The goal of the research in this proposal is to develop a set of rational design principles for the engineering the cold-activity into mesostable and thermostable enzymes. Through the careful analysis of biochemical and biophysical data of psychrophilic, mesophilic, thermophilic lipases, we will determine important characteristics and quantitative relationships between these properties and the cold-activity. Our hypothesis is that active site proximal flexibility is an important determinant of cold-activity and can be engineered into thermophilic enzyme scaffolds with minimal loss of thermostability. We will test our hypothesis by engineering a thermostable and mesostable lipase to be broadly active across a wide temperature range and to withstand substantial thermal challenge. Mutants obtained through rational protein engineering, loop grafting, and directed evolution will be used to further refine the quantitative design rules we will establish. To extend the usefulness of this framework, we will engineer thermostable enzymes for materials synthesis and degradation, including organophosphorus hydrolases and cuntinases. This research should make it possible to quickly and rationally engineer most any thermostable enzyme to retain its activity across a wide temperature range. Therefore, enzymes may be deployed with optimum performance and extended lifetimes critical to USAF goals.
“BioNanomanufacturing of Carbide Aerogels”, SC Space Grant Consortium, Co-Principal Investigator, $50,000 ($12,000), (2015-2016).
Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). 3 Year Grant with 2 Option Years (2016-2019). Immobilization is frequently used to enhance the lifetime and stability of enzymes, yet a fundamental understanding of the interactions between enzymes, covalent linkers, and complex polymeric surfaces enabling accurate prediction of system performance is lacking. While prediction of enzyme behavior in simple monolayers is well described, these capabilities fall short on complex polymer surfaces used in electrochemical or optical biosensors. The stabilizing effects of enzyme immobilization results in enzymes with longer useful lifetimes; however, this can come at the expense of specific enzyme activity, due to mass transfer limitations caused by orientation effects, the complex interplay between enzyme-linker-substrate interactions, and immobilization related unfolding of enzyme structure. Current approaches for addressing enzyme immobilization focus mostly on solutions to specific problems, i.e., on a specific combination of enzyme, linker, and immobilization chemistry. A broadly applicable understanding of the molecular scale interactions between enzyme-linker-substrate is required to make accurate predictions of the best overall immobilization strategy. This project uses a combined experimental and computational approach to understand the fundamental interactions in enzyme-linker-substrate systems. By combining experimental and simulation data sets, we will identify how particular characteristics of the enzyme, the linker, and the polymeric surface influence structure and activity. This enzyme activity-linker-surface relationship can be used to predict the effect of immobilization strategy on the activity of the enzyme, with application to enzymes for specific detection of tributyl phosphate solvent used in nuclear fuel processing.
Blenner, M. (2015, October). Enzymatic Deconstruction of Lignin for Biofuels. Advances in Enzymatic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels, 20-36.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1476

Engineering Biopharmaceutical Production from Mammalian Cell Culture

Over 70% of all biopharmaceuticals are made with Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. Cell lines that are stable, productive, and produce consistent quality products require significant time and investments. This CI aims to develops tools and technologies to better understand the molecular basis for cell line stability and alterations in product quality. This work is done in close partnership with a consortium of industrial mentors from the biopharma industry. 

Team Leaders
Mark Blenner Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Dyllan Rives
Accomplishments
*Gurtler, S., *Peters, V., *Richbourg, T., *Williamson, Z., Ragland, M., Rives, D., Harcum, S. & Blenner, M. (2019, April). Analyzing ER Stress and UPR activation in highly producing Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) Cell Lines. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
635

A non viral episomal vector system for induced pluripotent stem cell (IPS) production

Embryonic stem cells hold great promise for the cures of a variety of human diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's etc.. However, ES cell research has been hampered due to the ethical concerns of the use of human embryos. Recently, scientists have developed a novel way to convert somatic cells into ES-like cells through forced expression of four transcription factors key to the ES cell pluripotency maintenance. These cells are called induced pluripotent stem cells (IPS). The initial method used for IPS induction is based on retrovirus due to its high transfection efficiency. However, the potential dangers of retrovirus induced insertional mutagenesis and transformation pose great concerns for the applications of theses IPS cells in human. Therefore a great deal of research efforts have been put in the search of alternative delivery systems to create safer IPS cells, such as protein, mRNA, plasmid, and non integrating viral system. My laboratory has working with a non viral episomal vector based on the sequence of mammalian scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/mar), which are sequences in the DNA of eukaryotic chromosomes where the nuclear matrix attaches. S/mar sequences function as architectural DNA components that organize the genome of eukaryotes into functional units within the cell nucleus. Plasmids incorporated with S/mar sequence can be maintained as replicative episomal units within mammalian nuclei. We plan to clone the four transcription factors into this vector for IPS induction. This episomal vector system will not only reduce or eliminate the potentials of insertional mutagenesis, but also solve the problems of gradual loss from transfected cells encountered by regular plasmids due to the episomal replicative capacity of this plasmid.

Team Leaders
Xianzhong Yu Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
We are collaborating with Orbis Health Solution and Lauren's Hope foundation trying to establish patient-specific IPS for the treatment of Sanfilippo Syndrome, a deadly genetic disease affecting children. Both the company and the foundation have donated reagents to our research and we hope that further collaboration will lead to grants from them.
*Amanda Barrett, a former member of our team, get hired by MUSC as a research specialist to do IPS related work.*Milap Patel, also a former member of our team, get hired by Orbis Health Solutions to do patient-specific IPS related research work. Both hires are based on their experiences in our CI class.
College of ScienceG
376

Popular Science Journalism

The overall goal of this project is to produce a science column in the student body newspaper, The Tiger.  The name of the column is Tigra scientifica and is used to report on the hottest topics in scientific and academic research.

Team Leaders
Lesly Temesvari Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
Tuten, H.C., Temesvari, L.A. (2013, March). Popular Science Journalism: facilitating learning through peer review and communication of science news. Journal of Science College Teaching, 42(4), 46-49.
College of ScienceG
378

Designing Medical Technology for the Developing World

Developing countries face healthcare challenges every day, whether it is lack of supplies or a shortage of healthcare professionals. Medical devices and equipment that are considered standard in hospitals in the United States can be hard to find and very expensive in developing countries, such as Tanzania. Tanzania has recently made significant advances with the quality of their healthcare; however, there are still many hurdles that need to be overcome. The goal of this Creative Inquiry team is to design and develop medical instrumentation and monitors that are robust, user-friendly, and low-cost for developing countries. The students on this team will be expected to work on electronics and instrument design.  These types of projects not only have the ability to improve the lives of young infants and families, but they can also impact the medical field in developing nations worldwide. In addition to doing design, students are expected to learn about Tanzania. Students will learn about Tanzanian culture, government and healthcare structure. In addition, students will learn some basic conversational Swahili.

Team Leaders
Delphine Dean Bioengineering
Melinda Harman Bioengineering
John D DesJardins Bioengineering
Melissa McCullough Bioengineering
William Richardson Bioengineering
Accomplishments
*Byars, B., *Cannon, K., *Downing, M., *Elpers, M., *Hartsell, M., *Hargett, B., *Jamison, A., *Lee, T., *Livingstone, M., *Morton, Z., *Neely, K., *Pagendarm, H., *Rafka, H., *Ryan, T., *Shaffer, J., *Springer, G., *Staino, R., *Tedeschi, A., Harrison, J., Hargett, Z., *McCullough, M., DesJardins, J., *Richardson, W., Dean, D. (2019, April). Global Health Design. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Guion, K., Dean, D., *Rohde, J., *Young, C., *Gilbert, R., *Wilson, G., DesJardins, J., *Erickson, H. & *Hargett, Z. (2017, April 4-5). Medical Technology for Developing Countries. Poster presentation at the 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Young, C., *DeMass, I., *Brewer, C., *Gilbert, R., *Guion, K., McCullough, M., *DesJardins, J. & Dean, D. (2016, October). "Assessment of Medical Equipment in Kisarawe, Tanzania", presented at the Annual Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society, Minneapolis, MN.
*Stafford, S. & DesJardins, J. (2015, November), Designing Medical Devices for the Developing World: A Global Health Partnership in Biotechnology. Oral presentation at the Partnering for Impact in Global and Public Health Symposium, Charleston, SC
Cobb, A., *Hawks, Z., *Herbst, A. & *Rohde, J., (2015, December), MicroSense, Invention disclosure presentation to CURF. Oral presentation to the Clemson University Research Foundation, Clemson, SC.
*Rohde, J., *Brewer, C., *Young, C., *DeMass, I, *Guion, K., *Gilbert, R. & Cobb, A, (2016, April 6-7) "Designing Medical Technology for the Developing World." Poster Presented at the 11th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson SC.
*Showghi, J. D., *Stafford, S. G., *Veliz, J. S., Dean, D., DesJardins, J. & Rodriguez, J. (2014, March 28). Respire Medical, a breath assistive device for low resource settings. Presented at Fifth Annual National Undergraduate Global Health Technologies Design Competition, Houston, TX.
*Showghi, J., *Stafford, S., *Rohde, J., *Hawks, Z., *Herbst, A., *Veliz, J., *Murdy, J., Dean, D., DesJardins, J., Rodriguez, J. & Gainey, K. (2015, April 6). Designing Medical Technology for the Developing World. Poster presented at the 10th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Elpers, M., *McCaskill, B., *Sosdian, L. & Dean, D. (2010, April) Tanzania 2011 Wazungu, Saving Babies, and Awesome People. Presented at the Bioengineering Undergraduate Research Day, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Elpers M., *McCaskill, B., *Sosdian, L. & Dean, D. (2010, April) Tanzania 2011 Wazungu, Saving Babies, and Awesome People. Presented at the Honor's College Research and Travel Award Symposium, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Elpers M., *McCaskill, B., *Sosdian, L. & Dean, D. (2010, October). Low-Cost Temperature Control Alarm Systems Designed for Application in Third World Countries. Presented at the SouthEast Biomedical Engineering Career Conference, Orlando, FL.
*Kofoed, M., *Keith, K., *Nicholas, J., Dean, D. & DesJardins, J. (2012, October). Medical Equipment Breakdown Survey _ Weil Bugando Referral Hospital, Tanzania. Presented at the Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA.
*Wiles, L., *Langworthy, S., *Halsey, M., DesJardins, J. & Dean, D. (2012, October 24-27). Development of a Low-Cost Blood Glucose Monitoring System for Implementation in Resource-Poor Settings. Presented at the Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA.
*Youngman, T., *Kofoed, M., *Martin, D., *Metzger, A., Dean, D. & Desjardins, J. (2013, Sep 26). Developing a Woven Grass Neck Brace for Low Resource Implementation. Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society, Seattle, WA.
*Devon, A., *Gainey, K., *Adams, H., Desjardins, J. & Dean, D. (2013, Sep 28). Designing Neonatal Monitoring Devices for Resource-Poor Settings. Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society, Seattle, WA.
*Gainey, K., *Ovington, P., Desjardins, J. & Dean D. (2013, Sep 25-28). Design of Low Cost Glucometer and InkJet Printed Test Strips. Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society, Seattle, WA.
*Adams, H., *Adams, R., *Devon, C., *Hall, R., *Hargett, A., *Herbst, A., *Ovington, P., *Rye, K., *Stafford, S., *Tibbs, M., *Veliz, J., *Youngblood, R., Dean, D., Desjardins, J., *Gainey, K., *Metzger, A., Rodriguez, J. (2014, April 3). Designing medical technology for developing countries. Poster presented at the 9th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
NIH NMH R01 1R01MH111366-01 “Impact of Integrated HIV/NCD Screening on HIV Testing Uptake and Engagement in HIV Care: an RCT in Kisarawe, Tanzania” PI: M. Sweat (MUSC), D. Dean and D. DesJardins (Clemson) Award dates: Aug. 2016-2021 Total award: ~$3.5M
"Developing World Biomedical Device Innovation Co-op Program", VentureWell, $30,500 https://venturewell.org/portfolio-item/developing-world-biomedical-device-innovation-co-op-program/ This grant funds internship experience for our CI students to travel to Tanzania and do medical device assessment and needs finding.
Dean, D., DesJardins, J., McCullough, M., *Brewer, C., DeMass, I., *Guion, K., *Young, C. (2016). Designing medical devices for developing countries. Medical Design Technology. Sep/Oct 2016: 8-9. http://digital.mdtmag.com/medicaldesigntechnology/september_october_2016?pg=8#pg8
*Rohde, J., Cobb, A., *Gilbert, R., *Hawks, Z., Desjardins, J., Dean, D. (2016, July), "Development of Low-cost Impediometric Biosensors for Clinical Diagnostics and Water Testing", Proceedings of the annual Biomedical Engineering Society
*Gainey Wilson, K., *Ovington, P., & Dean, D. (2015). A Low-Cost Inkjet-Printed Glucose Test Strip System for Resource-Poor Settings. Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, 9(6), 1275–1281. https://doi.org/10.1177/1932296815589755
CI team was Clemson finalist for Clemson InVenture competition and they competed in the pitch competition on Feb. 2016. http://tv.clemson.edu/acc_inventure_prize_clemson_competition_full_event/
Kayla Gainey Wilson (former CI student) was a US finalist in the James Dyson Award competition. http://newsstand.clemson.edu/mediarelations/student-created-medical-device-advances-in-competition/
*Carson Brewer participated on the Emory Global Health Competition as the engineering student on MUSC's team. http://globalhealth.musc.edu/blog/musc-team-reflects-emory-university-global-health-case-competition
The Lemelson-MIT National Collegiate Student Prize Competition is a nationwide search for the most inventive undergraduate and graduate students, with winning undergraduate teams receiving $10,000 in two categories and graduate student winners receiving $15,000 in two categories: 1. "Cure it!"� for students with inventions that can improve healthcare. 2. "Use it!" for students with inventions that can improve consumer devices and tools. Tyler Ovington*, Alex Devon*, and Kayla Gainey* won in the "Cure it!"� undergraduate team category for their work in the Designing Medical Technology for the Developing World Creative Inquiry project. The Lemelson-MIT Program celebrates outstanding inventors and inspires young people to pursue creative lives and careers through invention.
The Woven Solutions team (Matthew Kofoed*, Danielle Martin*, Adam Metzger*, and Tyler Youngman*) from our CI won the Spiro Institutes Social LaunchPad Competition in April, 2013, for their work on woven neck braces that can be produced and used in low-technology areas such as rural Tanzania.
Katelyn Rye* and Sarah Stafford* (rising junior won the LIMBS International Design competition on prosthesis/orthosis design for developing countries. The finals were held at UT El Paso this weekend and Katelyn and Sarah won first place ($1000). It was for the latest design of the grass-woven neck brace from Tanzaniahttp://engineering.utep.edu/announcement061614.htm
Adam Metzger*, and Tyler Youngman* from our CI came in 2nd place at the Rice 360 Global Health Technology competitions for their work on woven neck braces that can be produced and used in low-technology areas such as rural Tanzania.
CI program and student, Jacki Rohde, featured in Anderson Independent Mail video and article: Eads, M., Anderson Indepent Mail, (Feb. 2016), Clemson engineering students devise cheap health solutions http://www.independentmail.com/news/clemson-engineering-students-devise-cheap-health-solutions-2c5df0b8-9a82-6349-e053-0100007f02a4-370293211.html
Katelyn Rye and Sarah Stafford (with Dr. Jorge Rodriguez, co-mentor) won the LIMBS International Design competition on prosthesis/orthosis design for developing countries. The finals were held at UT El Paso. Katelyn and Sarah won first place ($1000). It was for the latest design of the grass-woven neck brace from Tanzania.
Updated Invention disclosure to the university. (Hopefully should file patent soon) (CURF #2013-069) "Electrochemical Biosensor for the Detection of Microorganisms in Liquid Medium"
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
960

Campus Suicide Prevention

This project focuses on campuswide suicide prevention as part of Clemson's Tigers Together to Stop Suicide initiative (www.clemson.edu/suicideprevention). The project entails both programmatic and research activities focused on developing, delivering, and evaluating campus educational campaigns.  

Team Leaders
Heidi Zinzow Psychology
Kristi Bussell Student Health Center
Martha Thompson Public Health Sciences
Accomplishments
*Roth, R., *Erikson, D., *Johnson, A., *Solomon, D., *Wayt, R., *Ward, K., *Nicks, A., *Thompson, M., *Bussell, K., *Zinzow, H. (2019, April). Tigers Together Advocacy Training: A Controlled Trial of Impact on Knowledge and Behavioral Change. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Erikson, D., *Free, K., *Krug, B., *Fields, M. & *Webster, C. (2018, April 2-3). The impact of trauma, emotion regulation, and media contagion effects on non-suicidal self injury and suicidal behavior. Poster presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Stanton, C., *Farrenkopf, K., *Free, K., *Fritsche, A., *Krug, B., *Fields, M., *Bogardus, L., Zinzow, H., Thompson, M. (2017, April). Tigers Together: Examining the Efficacy of a Suicide Prevention Advocacy Training. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Series of videos from August 28-29, 2016
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
643

Aspire: Developing Peer Delivered Initiatives to Foster the Promotion of a Healthy Campus

Aspire: Developing Peer Delivered Initiatives to Foster the Promotion of a Healthy Campus works with the Aspire to Be Well Program, which is a 90-minute peer-led health- and safety-focused dialogue and CU 1000 requirement. The dialogue covers key areas to maintaining a healthy and safe campus including overall wellness, alcohol and other drug misuse prevention, mental health and suicide prevention, and interpersonal violence prevention. Students will gain an understanding of campus resources and learn how to help others in need through risk-reduction strategies and bystander intervention. Students enrolled in this Creative Inquiry will explore topics related to Aspire, receive extensive training on delivering the content to new students and research trends related to health and wellness in higher education.

Team Leaders
Chloe Greene Student Health Center
Rosemary Holt School of Nursing
Jennifer Goree Student Health Center
Martha Thompson Public Health Sciences
Accomplishments
*Steele, A., Greene, C., Myer, C., *Stone, L. (2019, April). The Unregulated Market of Social Media, And its Affect on the Alcohol Habits of College Students. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Uzell, L., Brown, D., Goree, J., Green, C., Palmer, H., Thompson, M. (2017, April). Increasing Student Resiliency through the Aspire to be Well Program. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Hester, E., *Wood, S., and *Webster, C. (2016). "Aspire Presentation". Presented at Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
Harbin, M, *Smith, T., *Uzell, L., (2016, March). Increasing Suicide Awareness and Prevention on Campus Through the Aspire to Be Well Program. Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
Allison, H., Burnette, C., Duncan, R., Greene, C., (2015, March). Breaking Down the Silos of Prevention. NAPSA Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA.
Allison, H., Greene, C., Goree, J., *Hinson, A., Rock, K., *Shaw, C., and Thompson, M. (2015, April). Developing Peer Delivered Initiatives to Foster the Promotion of a Healthy Campus. Poster presentation at Clemson University 10th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Goree, J., Greene, C., Thompson, M., Zinzow, H., (2015, April) Aspire to Be Well Fall 2014. Student Affairs Vice President Cabinet Meeting. Clemson, SC.
1552

Waikiki and the World: A Study of the Pacific Islands and Their Peoples

This Creative Inquiry project provides an opportunity for students to evaluate the impact of colonialism, contemporary capitalism and modern tourism on the physical integrity of the Hawaiian islands and their culture by exploring the history, art, and worship practices of the indigenous peoples. Hawaii and the rest of the Pacific Islands represent a special place in the cultural imagination of those who live outside of the region. Its image as a tropical paradise filled with exotic landscapes and peoples has been shaped through the lens of American pop culture from films, television shows, musical theater productions to party themed-sets and popular music, all which inform the development of Hawaiian tourism. 

Team Leaders
William Terry History
Katie Laporte
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
418

Exploration into Soft Tissue Sports Injuries: Diagnosis and Prevention

The impact of injury on athletes is well known by the general public. Current research shows that many injuries are caused by repetitive stresses to a joint, tendon, or ligament. In this project we will use medical imaging techniques, tissue and cell based measurements, and body scale sensor data to develop measurements, and analyses to detect and diagnose the potential causes, existence of, severity, and eventually efficacy of treatment for soft tissue injuries injury. This project has a wide potential impact as well as the opportunity to work with clinicians in a clinical setting.

Team Leaders
Delphine Dean Bioengineering
Olivia Newkirk
Accomplishments
*Newkirk, O., *Judge, M., *Lindsey, K., *Seilkop, A., *Santore, A., *Shannon, M., *Bednarek, C., *Schindler, K., *Lee, R. & Moses, Q.(2019, April). Tendon Structure and Properties as it Relates to Sports Injuries. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Bocklet, C., *Kowal, E., *Hefter, G., *Marlowe, M., *Warner, M., *Harley, W., Dean, D. & Kwartowitz, D. M. (2016, October 5-8) “Ultrasound Elastography Probe Design for Rotator Cuff Diagnosis.” Presented at the BMES Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, MN.
*Harley, W., *Kowal, E., *Showers, K., *Corbett, C., *Scruggs, H., *Hefter, G., *Marlowe, M., *Matel, N., Dean, D. & Kwartowitz, D. (2015, October 7-10). "Ultrasound Elastography Probe Design for Rotator Cuff Diagnosis," Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting, Tampa, FL
*Scruggs, H., *Cusik, A., *Grove, K., *Guo, Q., *Perry, K., *Rogers, M., Kwartowitz, D. & Dean, D. (2012, October). Force sension ultrasound probe design for better rotator cuff injury diagnosis. Presented at the Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA.
*Scruggs, H., *Corbett, C., *Cusick, A., *Perry, K., *Sudduth, B., *Cash, H., *Showers, K., *Hanschke, M., Dean, D. & Kwartowitz, D. (2013, Sep. 28). "Force Sensor Ultrasound Probe Design for Better Rotator Cuff Injury Diagnosis". Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society, Seattle, WA.
*Showers, M., *Kerr, C., *Cash, H., *Corbett, C., *Kowal, E., *Scruggs, H., *Hanschke, M., Dean, D. & Kwartowitz, D. (2014, April 3). Detachable force sensor for an ultrasound probe to improve rotator cuff injury diagnosis. Poster presented at the 9th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Hefter, G., *Warner, M., Dean, D., Kwartowitz, D. (submitted 2017). Force sensor ultrasound probe design for better rotator cuff injury diagnosis. IEEE Engineering in Medicine.
The team won 1st place in the audience vote for the FoCI photography contest
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1585

Micro-Heart Tissue Pumps and Pipes

Heart disease is the #1 cause of death in the world every year, and finding new therapies to treat heart disease is very slow and very expensive. Fortunately, researchers are able to grow small pieces of heart tissue in the lab to test new therapies as quickly, cheaply, and safely as possible. Unfortunately, these heart cells in a dish do not behave the same as heart cells in our body because they are no longer subjected to the same mechanical environment of a beating heart under pressure. In this creative inquiry, we are developing new culture chambers for growing heart cells in mechanically-realistic conditions in order to improve future therapy screens. Students will work in teams to (1) build miniature pump and pipe chambers, (2) grow heart-like tissues within these chambers, and (3) test the effects of different therapies on these functional tissues under disease-like conditions.

Team Leaders
William Richardson Bioengineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1006

Contemporary Art & Practice

Contemporary Art & Practice is a Departmental Creative Inquiry two-semester sequence consisting of ART 4730, and then ART 4750. Visual Arts Majors seeking the Bachelors of Fine Arts (BFA) Degree begin this Creative Inquiry two semesters from graduation such that their final exhibition in the Lee Gallery coincides with their enrollment in ART 4750. Contemporary Art & Practice CI students will explore historical and theoretical issues to gain critical perspectives on Art, visit and study current exhibitions in galleries in museums in New York City, gain professional experience, and share their studio research in an exhibition in the Lee Gallery. 

Team Leaders
Joey Manson Art
Denise C Woodward-Detrich Art
Accomplishments
*Lemere, L., *Rodgers, H., *Comen, K., *Coward, A., *Davis, A., *Embree, N., *Horowitz, H., *Hutchinson, G., *Mccraw, S., *New, S., *Watson, M., *Wood, S., Manson V, J., Woodward-Detrich, D. (2019, April). Contemporary Art & Practice. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
574

Implementation of Public Art for the Clemson University Campus

Clemson University's Public Art Program features the works of nationally recognized artists. We are dedicated to exploring opportunities where public art becomes woven into the campus environment. All artwork selected for projects will be intellectually engaging while demonstrating qualities that elicit questions and prompt discourse. Artworks are site specific and are commissioned through a competitive process. 

Team Leaders
David M Detrich Art
Joey Manson Art
Denise C Woodward-Detrich Art
Accomplishments
*Alewine, J., *Bull, C., *Coward, A., *Jones, S., *Konopka, L., *Wright, J., *Comen, K., *Embree, N., *Massey, K., Detrich, D., Manson V, J., Woodward-Detrich, D. (2019, April). Clemson Public Art: Atelier InSite. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Lamont, B., *Farrow, S. (2014). Atelier InSite Public Art initiative. Presentation, City of Clemson State of the Arts Conference, Clemson, SC.
On August 26, 2013 the University Administrative Council approved a proposed policy that sets aside 1/2% of construction costs for new building projects and renovations exceeding $2 million for the purpose of implementing public art
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
648

Humanitarian Aid to Support Ethnic Reconciliation

Students collect aid for young students (K 1-9) in Srebrenica and deliver it in May during the Study Abroad Balkans program. Their work during academic years starting in 2012 was always very successful. 

Team Leaders
Vladimir Matic Political Science
Accomplishments
*Bell, M., *Hayes, S., *Mccarter, A., Matic, V. (2019, April). A Creative Inquiry in Humanitarian Aid to Support Ethnic Reconciliation. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
649

AIChE ChemE Car Team

The ChemE Car team develops a car which runs on energy which is generated by the car itself.  At competition, the car carries a payload a certain distance and must then stop; the car which is closest to the target distance wins. 

Team Leaders
Christopher Kitchens Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Christopher W. Norfolk Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Accomplishments
*Owen, K., *Childs, B., *Pstrak, P., *Dworkin, J., *Coats, J., *Joshi, J., *Redzikowski, J., *Hughes, E. & Kitchens, C. (2014, April 3). ChemE car. Poster presented at the 9th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
454

Food Ingredient Applications

Various food processes and techniques will be developed to evaluate and explore the functional properties of food ingredients. Food characteristics are a function of processing techniques and ingredient formulation.  This team explores the application of novel food processing techniques, ingredient selection and formulation to modify the functional characteristics of foods.

Team Leaders
John U. McGregor Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
Accomplishments
Presi Presentation for the Ice Cream Innovation Lab.  Created in collaboration with the Ice Cream Innovation Team.
Raised $3,000 in funding to support travel to industry trade show.
ESPN Video Shoot.2016. '55 Exchange History and Culture
ESPN Video Shoot.2016. Creative use of Ice Cream Ingredients
$2,500 was received from the National Dairy Shrine to support travel of students to Madison WI to attend the Wisconsin Cheese Makers Annual meeting.
*Sam Lopane received the International Dairy Industries Joe Larson Leadership Award which is given to the student that has demonstrated the greatest leadership potential. This is our industry's version of the Heisman Trophy.
A three person team competed in the Collegiate Dairy Products Evaluation Contest against other universities from Canada and the US. Clemson placed 2nd overall with numerous top 3 individual and team awards.
Carr Family Creative Inquiry Endowment
Clemson's team of students finished 2nd overall in the National Collegiate Dairy Products Evaluation Competition that was held in Chicago, IL at the International Dairy and Foods Processing Expo.� The competition was established in 1916 and is recognized by the Food Manufacturing Industry as a key opportunity to identify the future leaders of the world's largest manufacturing industry and the institutions they represent.� This group of students were outstanding representatives for Clemson at this prestigious meeting of internationally recognized business and industry leaders.
Food Safety Plan  for Clemson Ice Cream, documents and templates created for use by other ice cream manufactures.  Presented at the National Ice Cream Retailers Association Annual meeting
*Worley K. & *MacDonald, K. (2016) Development of an Ice Cream Innovation Lab. Presented to department faculty in preparation for industry presentations during the fall 2016 semester, Clemson, SC.
*Haile, A., *Madore, C. & *Mathews, S. (2012, November 7-10). Evaluation of Vanilla Ice Cream Flavor Standards. Presented at the 79th Annual National Ice Cream Retailers Association Meeting, Greenville, SC.
*Santoro, H., *Ciccone, M., *Fish, K. & *Newsome, P. (2012, November 7-10). Evaluation of Strawberry Ice Cream Flavor Standards. Presented at the 79th National Ice Cream Retailers Association Annual Meeting, Greenville, SC.
*Davis, C., *Richards, C., *Thompson, S. & *Burpee, G. (2012, November 7-10). Evaluation of Regular Chocolate Ice Cream Flavor Standards. Presented at the 79th National Ice Cream Retailers Association Annual Meeting, Greenville, SC.
*Maddox, B., *Suhoza, S., *Felch, C. (2012, November 7-10). Evaluation of Dark Chocolate Ice Cream Flavor Standards. Presented at the 79th National Ice Cream Retailers Association Annual Meeting, Greenville, SC.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
493

The Domestic Politics of US Treaties

The goal of this project is eventual publication of a book on the domestic politics of international agreements, primarily focused on the Obama administration and the Trump administration's response to Obama's agreements.  

Team Leaders
Jeffrey Peake Political Science
Accomplishments
Peake. J. S. (2017). Obama, unilateral diplomacy, and Iran: Treaties, executive agreements, and political commitments. 142-171. Presidential Leadership and National Security: The Obama Legacy and Trump Trajectory, ed., Richard S. Conley. Routledge Press, New York, NY. ISBN-10: 113828419X
Peake, J. S., Krutz, G. S. (2014, August). Le President Obama, les Clevages Partisans et la Politique des Accords Internationaux (President Barack Obama, Partisanship, and the Politics of International Agreements). 2014 Annuaire Francais des Relations Internatinales XV, 534-59, in French.
Peake, J. S. (2014, December). The Domestic Politics of U.S. Treaty Ratification: Bilateral Treaties from 1949 - 2012. Foreign Policy Analysis.
*Forrester, V.C., *Wilson, E. (2016, April). Treaty Politics in an Era of Partisan Polarization. Paper presented at the Midwest Political Science Association Meetings, Chicago, IL.
Peake, J. S. (2016, April 9). The Congressional Role in US Diplomacy in an Era of Presidential Unilateralism and Partisan Polarization, paper presented at the Midwest Political Science Association meetings, Chicago, IL.
*Forrester, V. C., *Wilson, E. A. (2016, April 8). Treaty Politics in an Era of Partisan Polarization. Paper presented as a poster at the Midwest Political Science Association meetings, Chicago, IL.
Peake, J.S. (2015, April). Executive Agreements as a Foreign Policy Tool during the Bush and Obama Administrations. Presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, IL.
Peake, J.S. (2014, August). Unilateral Power during the Obama Presidency: Executive Agreements and the Implementation of American Diplomacy. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Washington, DC.
Peake, J.S. (2014, April). The Obama Administration's Use of Executive Agreements: Business As Usual or Presidential Unilateralism? Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, IL.
Peake, Jeffrey S. (2013, August). The Domestic Politics of International Agreements during the Obama Administration: Presidential Unilateralism and Senatorial Obstruction. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago, IL.
Peake, Jeffrey S. (2013, April). The Domestic Politics of US Treaty Ratification: Bilateral Treaties from 1949-2012. Presented at the Annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association.
Virginia Chase Forrester presents her paper at the 2016 Midwest Political Science Association meetings in Chicago.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
958

Camera traps in animal ecology

This project is designed to train undergraduate students to design, carryout and report on investigations into animal ecology through the use of remote camera trapping technology.  Specifically, students will utilize camera traps to collect scientific data on the location of animal species, then work with the mentors to analyze the data and report findings.  Students will be expected to be involved with the entire scientific process from building hypotheses to writing and presenting findings at professional meetings.   

Team Leaders
David Jachowski Forestry & Environment Conserv
Laura Gigliotti Forestry & Environment Conserv
Accomplishments
*Goodman, K., *Rhodes, K., *Stewart, S., *Stowasser, M., *Chapman, Z., *Gigliotti, L., Jachowski, D. (2019, April). Effects of vehicles on African wildlife activity and behavior. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Eastern Spotted Skunk
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1383

Controlled Environment Agriculture: Innovation of distributing food to urban environments and food deserts

The project will provide an atmosphere for the design and evaluation of a moderate sized controlled environment container to yield animal protein, vegetables to supplement fresh food in an urban environment.  Urban areas, also called food deserts, have limitations to fresh food and previous research has proven that, if available, people would welcome the choice of fresh food to prepare in their household. People are also reassured that the products being produced are fresh and free from harmful chemicals. Transportation is limited for these people so getting to a grocery store is somewhat restricted, so the idea of bringing a food production unit to the area is widely accepted.  Presently these portable controlled environment units are available and expensive, however economics performed usually show limited to no revenue.  The CI will investigate what is needed for the unit to produce food but on a more economical scale.  This would also benefit school systems by providing fresh food to supplement the cafeteria needs for fresh food and at the same time becomes an effective teaching tool that can be positive reinforcement for understanding science, math and economics topics in an enjoyable and dynamic atmosphere.

Team Leaders
Lance Beecher Plant & Environmental Sciences
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1384

Unraveling the Mystery of the Rare Rocky Shoals Spider Lily

Rocky Shoals Spider Lilies are an important part of South Carolina’s natural heritage and probably existed along most Piedmont streams prior to hydropower development of shoals and sedimentation of creeks and streams due to agricultural practices. The watershed for Stevens Creek is forested and mostly undeveloped allowing us a glimpse of what plant, fish, and even mussel populations may have looked like prior to European influence. There is a population of Rocky Shoals Spider Lilies that runs approximately 150 yards along Steven Creek on the Naturaland Trust Property.As a part of this CI, students will research and characterize the Stevens creek run where the Rocky Shoals Spider Lily occurs and at least two additional sites where historic populations existed to determine why the Rocky Shoals Spider Lily has such a robust population along this stretch of stream. Students will collect water quality data using the SC adopt a stream protocol and characterize the sites. They will additionally put out game cameras as one hypothesis is that deer herbivory is impacting Rocky Shoals Spider Lilies. Students will also work to propagate Rocky Shoals Spider Lilies in greenhouses at Clemson so that we will have a population we can attempt to introduce to other suitable stream stretches. By using the SC adopt a stream protocol, students will be adding to a database of stream health for the state and they will be able to compare Stevens Creek to other SC streams to determine what is different about Stevens creek that allows the Rocky Shoals Spider Lily to persist.

Team Leaders
Althea Hagan Forestry & Environment Conserv
William C Stringer Entomology, Soils & Plant Sci
Lisa Lord
Accomplishments
*Jellema, H., *Schafer, K., Hagan, A., Stringer, W. (2019, April). Unraveling the Mystery of the Rare Rocky Shoals Spider Lily. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
468

South Carolina Natural History Schools Outreach Project

Clemson students select projects that focus on environmental research in public parks or other venues accessible to K-12 students.  After completing their research goals, participants communicate their results by designing outdoor learning experiences for these students that incorporate their research findings and align with the science curriculum standards for that specific grade level.  Some examples of typical projects include constructing a nature trail in a woodland adjacent to a local elementary school; introducing K-12 students to an activity known as 'geocaching' in which students use GPS units to locate buried 'treasure' that others have left behind; and designing classroom activities based on topographic maps and aerial photographs of environmentally important sites.

Team Leaders
John R Wagner Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
Accomplishments
*Belt, S., Chokshi, P., Bright, A., Shugh, K., Wagner, J. (2019, April). Biodiversity in a Pendleton Woodland. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Archer, J., Wagner, J. (2017, April). Interactive Tour of the Pendleton School Nature Trail. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Archer, J., *Bobo, A., *Braun, S., *Canterbury, S., *Huston, C., *Knowlin, L., *Sherley, K., *Smithdeal, C., Stefano, G., *Tidd, K., *Winns, J. (2016, April). The Pendleton Elementary School Nature Trail. Poster presented at the 11th Annual Poster Forum at the Focus on Creative Inquiry Symposium, Clemson, SC.
Undergraduate student *Jacob Archer was awarded the third place prize in the 'Digital Poster Category' at the 12th Annual "Focus on Creative Inquiry" symposium in April 2017.
Video of the Pendleton Elementary School Nature Trail
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
522

Experiencing Woody Plant Genomics and Biotechnology

The project aims to utilize genomics tools and advanced biotechnological approaches to improve plant health and enhance nutritional/medicinal values and production. Focuses are woody plants. Students are exposed to molecular techniques, bioinformatics, tissue culture, data recording and analysis, and greenhouse management. The project will cultivate students’ interests in plants and understanding of plants’ important roles plants in food supply, environment, and human well-being.

Team Leaders
Haiying Liang Genetics and Biochemistry
Accomplishments
*Carlson, A., Zhang, X., Tian, Z., Staton, M., Schlarbaum, S.E., Romero-Severson, J., Carlson, J.E., Liang, H. (2013, June). Liriodendron EST-SSR marker development and genetic constitution of two Liriodendron seed orchards. Presented at the South Forest Tree Improvement Conference. Clemson, SC.
Xu, C., *Stott, G., *Barclay, M., Liang, H. (2014, April). Unraveling the basal angiosperm cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) genes that are involved in lignin biosynthesis. Poster presented at the Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
Chen, C.C., Xu, Y., Xu, T., Staton, M., *Stott, G., Bukles, O., Schlarbaum, S.E., Carlson, J.E., Liang, H. (2014). Poster presented in 2014 Biology Annual Meeting, Portland, OR.
*Carlson, A., Zhang, X., Tian, Z., Staton, M., Schlarbaum, S.E., Romero-Severson, J., Carlson, J.E., Liang, H. (2013, June 23). Liriodendron EST-SSR marker development and genetic constitution of two Liriodendron seed orchards. Presented at the Plant Biology Annual Meeting, Providence, RI.
Congrats to the two CI students who graduated in 2015!!!
CI student presented in Plant Biology 2014 meeting in Portland, OR.
CI student conducted Arabidopsis transformation
CI student conducted pollination in the field
CI student presented in the Plant Biology 2013 meeting in Providence, RI
Zhang, X., Carlson, A., Tian, Z., Staton, M., Schlarbaum, S.E., Carlson, J.E., Liang, H . (2015, June). Genetic characterization of Liriodendron seed orchards with EST-SSR markers. Journal of Plant Science and Molecular Breeding, 4(1).
Chen, C.C., Xu, Y., Xu, T., Staton, M., *Stott, G., Bukles, O., Schlarbaum, S.E., Carlson, J.E., Liang, H. (2015, January). Diversity level of genomic microsatellites in redbay (Perseaborbonia L.) generated by Illumina sequencing. Journal of Plant Science and Molecular Breeding, 4(2).
CI student Alanna Carlson* received a 3rd place poster award in 2013 Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference
College of ScienceG
526

Soil Judging Project - Hands-On Experience in Soil Science

Soil characteristics are key to land productivity and the objective of this project is to learn hands-on techniques to be able to interpret soils based on physical soil properties.  Soil morphology and classification skills are critical to help understand the best and most productive uses of different land areas. These skills and knowledge are applied through a group project focused on real-life soils-based issues in the U.S and Internationally.    

Team Leaders
Elena Mikhailova Forestry & Environment Conserv
Accomplishments
*Boykin, T., *Bryson, J., *Crow, G., *Fincher, G., *Mcmillan, K., *Nicholson, L., *Ruple, A., *Snively, T., Mikhailova, E. (2019, April). Soil Judging Project. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Mikhailova, E.A., *Baldwin, R., *Barringer, L., *Brady, J., *Hinson, W., *Infinger, D., *Morales, C., *Porter, B., *Sherbert, C., *Sigmon, T. & *Sumwalt, W. (2017, April 6). Soil Judging project. Presented at the 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Green, A., *Kneece, R., *Murphy, H., *Padgett, A. *Rogers, T., *Tisdale, E. (2017, April). Soil Inventory of Private Lands in South Carolina. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Baldwin, R., *Barringer, L., *Brady, J., *Hinson, W., *Infinger, D., *Morales, C., *Porter, B., *Sherbert, C., *Sigmon, T., *Sumwalt, W., Mikhailova, E. (2017, April). Soil Judging Project. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Dukart, Y.L., Mikhailova, E.A., Post, C.J. (2016, April). Adaptation of Soil Judging to Brazil. Presented at FoCI, Clemson University, SC.
http://gis.clemson.edu/elena/SoilJudgingFall2014.htmhttp://gis.clemson.edu/elena/AuburnUniversity.htm
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
489

Exploring Peptoid Proteins: Making and Structurally Characterizing Peptidomimetic Structures

Natural peptides and proteins are critically important in biology and medicine as well as increasingly in biotechnology and the chemical industry. Chemical structures mimicking the properties of natural peptides and proteins have been developed over the past three decades, with enormous potential for transformative impact in many fields. One handicap of these peptide-mimetic systems, however, is the lack of a broad scope of knowledge comparable to that available for natural proteins and peptides. Databases such as the Protein Data Bank contain structures for ~150,000 natural proteins, collected over the past ~50 years. These rich data sources enable whole fields of research, such as bioinformatics and protein engineering, that rely on having abundant data. Design of peptide mimics and hybrid peptide-peptidomimetic systems, therefore, relies on rational planning and design. This project involves both a structural component--synthesizing peptoids and other peptide mimics to study their structures and test predictions for novel secondary structures; as well as biomedical component--e.g., using the proven strategy of replacing proline residues in peptides with peptoid residues, as well as incorporating other peptidomimetic residues such as PEGylated amino acids into peptides of medical interest. 

Team Leaders
Modi Wetzler Chemistry
Accomplishments
*Cannon, J., *Haberman, V. (2017, April). Extending Half-lives of Peptide Hormones by PEGylation. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Haberman, V., Hamilton, P., and  Wetzler, M. (2016, October 23-26). "Facile synthesis of PEGylated vasopressin, lypressin, and oxytocin analogs". Presented at the Southeast Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Columbia, SC.
Dong, D., Ehrlich, D., Johnson, J., and Wetzler, M. (in press). "Faster and Greener: One Minute Reactions for Synthesis of Peptoid Oligomers and Polymers". Journal of the American Chemical Society. 
College of ScienceG
479

Comparative Vertebrate Musculoskeletal Biomechanics

Research in my lab examines the patterns and processes of functional evolution in vertebrates. To understand the factors that have contributed to evolutionary transitions in function, we test the functional consequences of variation in biological design, primarily through experimental studies of vertebrate musculoskeletal biomechanics. We have extended these studies to include selection experiments on functional performance, allowing us to evaluate the impact of functional tradeoffs on structural diversification. Our three primary study systems have been examinations of (1) the load bearing capacity of vertebrate limb bones (and fish fins) during terrestrial and aquatic locomotion; (2) the functional performance of waterfall climbing gobiid fishes in a variety of behaviors, including climbing, predator escape, and feeding; and (3) the effects of differences in body structure on the swimming performance of turtles. These systems have allowed a diverse range of comparative studies that have provided insight into broader issues in the diversity and evolution of vertebrate functional design. Studies of these systems are complemented by investigations of other systems as new questions and opportunities emerge.

Team Leaders
Richard Blob Biological Sciences
Kelly Diamond Biological Sciences
Amanda Palecek Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Forker, G., Blob, R., Diamond, K. (2019, April). Bendy to the bone: a comparison of vertebral morphology and locomotor modes. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Stevens, L.M., Mayerl, C.J., Rivera, G., Vance, J.T. & Blob, R. (2017, April 4-5). Testing the effects of keels on stability and maneuverability in aquatic turtles. Poster presented at the 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
Rubin, A. M.*, Diamond, K. M., Schoenfuss, H. L.,  Blob, R. W. (2017, January 4-8) Assessing the impacts of environmental contaminants on escape behavior in the migratory stream goby Sicyopterus stimpsoni. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, New Orleans, LA
Mayerl, C.J., *Pruett, J.E., Rivera, A.R.V. & Blob, R.W. (2016, June 29-July 3). Hind limb muscle function in turtles: is novel skeletal design correlated with novel muscle function? Presented at the 11th International Congress of Vertebrate Morphology meeting, Bethesda, MA.
*Rubin, A. M., Diamond, K. M., Schoenfuss, H. L. & Blob, R. W. (2016, February 20). Field observation of intraspecific and predatory attack behaviors of the Hawaiian sleeper fish, Eleotris sandwicensis. Poster presented at the Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Pruett, J.E., Mayerl, C.J., Rivera, A.R.V. & Blob, R.W. (2016, February 20). Motor patterns of the hind limb muscles of pleurodire turtles. Poster presented at the Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Pruett, J.E., Mayerl, C.J., Rivera, A.R.V. & Blob, R.W. (2016, April 6-7). Motor patterns of the hind limb muscles of pleurodire turtles: correlations between changes in muscle attachments and activity. Poster presented at the 11th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Vest, K. G., Young, V. K H., Espinoza, N. R., Blob, R. W. (2016, April 6-7). Swimming in terrestrial turtles: does limb function correlate with ecology or phylogeny? Poster presented at the 11th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Rubin, A. M., Diamond, K. M., Schoenfuss, H. L., Blob, R. W. (2016, January). Field observation of intraspecific and predatory attack behaviors of the Hawaiian sleeper fish, Eleotris sandwicensis. Poster presented at the Annual meeting for the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, Portland, OR.
Bertram, R.S., Schoenfuss, H.L., Lagarde, R., Ponton, D., Diamond, K.M.,  *Offerle, T. & Blob, R.W.  (2016, January). Waterfall-climbing performance of gobiid fishes from La Reunion: how conservative are novel functional behaviors? Presented at the Annual SICB meeting, Portland, OR.
*Pruett, J. E., Mayerl, C. J., Rivera, A. R. V., Blob, R. W. (2016, Jan). Motor patterns of the hind limb muscles of pleurodire turtles: correlations between changes in muscle attachments and activity. Poster Presented at the Annual meeting for the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, Portland, OR.
*Hicks, K., *Pruett, J., *Youngblood, J., Mayerl, C. & Blob, R. (2015, April 6). Effects of flow on the swimming stability of turtles. Poster presented at the 10th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Cullen, J., Maie, T., Schoenfuss, H. & Blob, R. (2013). Novelty versus exaptation Oral kinematics in feeding versus climbing in the Hawaiian stream goby Sicyopterus stimpsoni. Presented at the 2013 National SICB meeting, San Francisco, CA.
*Cullen, J., Maie, T., Schoenfuss, H. & Blob, R. (2012). Novelty versus exaptation Oral kinematics in feeding versus climbing in the Hawaiian stream goby Sicyopterus stimpsoni. Presented at the 2012 Southeast Regional SICB meeting, Charleston, SC.
*Sutton, J., Blob, R., Young, V. (2014, April). In vivo femoral strains in swimming turtles: Influence of locomotor medium on limb bone loading. Poster presented at the 9th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
CI student *Alex Rubin (graudated 2017) has been admitted to the graduate program at Auburn University.
Former CI student *Jenna Pruett (graduated 2016) received a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship to pursue graduate studies at Auburn University.
Student Poster award - *Stevens, L.M., Mayerl, C.J., Rivera, G., Vance, J.T., Blob, R. (2017, April). Testing the effects of keels on stability and maneuverability in aquatic turtles. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Morgan Summerlin, Third Place, Science as Art competition, Clemson.
*Jake Youngblood, admitted to graduate program in biology at Arizona State University
*Jenna Pruett - admitted to graduate program in Biology at Auburn University
*Jenna Pruett – Honorable Mention, National Science Foundation GRFP
*Jenna Pruett – 1st place Best poster presentation at FOCI
*Jenna Pruett – 2nd place Best poster presentation at Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium
Mayerl, C.J., *Pruett, J.E., Rivera, A.R.V., Blob, R.W. (2017). Hindlimb muscle function in turtles: is novel skeletal design correlated with novel muscle function?. Journal of Experimental Biology, 2017(220), pp.2554-2562.
Young, V., *Vest, K., Rivera, A., Espinoza, N., & Blob, R. (2017). One foot out the door: limb function during swimming in terrestrial versus aquatic turtles. Biology Letters, 13(1), 20160732. http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2016.0732
Maie, T., Furtek, S., Schoenfuss, H. L., & Blob, R. W. (2013). Feeding performance of the Hawaiian sleeper,Eleotris sandwicensis (Gobioidei: Eleotridae): correlations between predatory functional modulation and selection pressures on prey. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 111(2), 359–374. https://doi.org/10.1111/bij.12214
*Cullen, J.A., Maie, T., Schoenfuss, H.L., Blob, R.W. (2013) Evolutionary Novelty versus Exaptation: Oral Kinematics in Feeding versus Climbing in the Waterfall-Climbing Hawaiian Goby Sicyopterus stimpsoni. PLoS ONE 8(1): e53274. dx.dio.org/doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0053274
Kawano, S. M., Bridges, W. C., Schoenfuss, H. L., Maie, T., & Blob, R. W. (2012). Differences in locomotor behavior correspond to different patterns of morphological selection in two species of waterfall-climbing gobiid fishes. Evolutionary Ecology, 27(5), 949–969. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10682-012-9621-z
College of ScienceG
491

Reading and Reviewing Children's and Young Adult Literature

Students will write reviews to be published in a children's and young literature (grades K-12) column that appears in a state journal of the South Carolina International Reading Association.

Team Leaders
Jonda McNair Teacher Education
Accomplishments
McNair, J. C., and Clemson University Students (2016). The Right Book: A Review of Children’s Literature for Teachers. Reading Matters, 16, 72-75.
McNair, J. C., Clemson University Students, & Thomas, K. (2017). The Wonderful World of Books: A Review of Children’s Literature for Teachers. Reading Matters, 17, 69-72.
College of EducationE
498

Democracy Building in Post-Conflict Societies: The Cases of Serbia, Kosovo, BiH, Montenegro and Croatia

Students are engaged in research of the history and causes of the conflicts in former Yugoslavia working in 5 teams, one for each country to be visited in May/June. They present their findings and draft research papers which are then finished during Summer Study Abroad using primary sources. 

Team Leaders
Vladimir Matic Political Science
Accomplishments
Jessica Collins applied for the Fulbright Scholarship in Serbia and got it in summer 2015. Since mid September she is teaching at the Faculty of Philosophy in Nis. She is also Clemson on-site Mentor for a group of our students who are in Serbia - Clemson Spring Semester in Belgrade program
Holba, K.*, Matic, V. (2014, April). Humanitarian aid for ethnic reconciliation. Poster presented at the Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1121

Breaking Bud: investigating the environmental control of spring bloom timing in peach.

Trees must time their spring bloom to avoid late frosts but allow sufficient developmental time for their fruit and seeds. Although we know cool (chilling) followed by warm (heat) temperatures are necessary for bloom, we do not currently understand the quantitative relationship between chilling and heat that results in a specific bloom date for a cultivar. Missing this information means we cannot make accurate predictions of the timing of bloom and the start of the growing season now or under future climate change scenarios. Additionally, understanding the environmental and genetic factors that determine timing of bloom date is critical to efforts to breed tree fruit varieties adapted to our current or future climates. The goal of this work is to establish the relationship between chilling and heat requirements for bloom date in trees and whether there is variation for this relationship within a species. We will test these question using peach trees from the diverse germplasm collection located at the Musser Experimental Fruit Research Farm. 

Team Leaders
Douglas Bielenberg Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
USDA Specialty Crop Block Grant
*Cook, K., *Scott, G., *Spencer, H., Bielenberg, D. (2017, April). Characterizing genotype specific responses to chilling and heat for predicting spring bud break in peach. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of ScienceG
1169

Kinetic Sculpture

We create pieces of art which incorporate movement into them.  We display these at Artisphere, the art festival in Greenville held in May, and some are planned around Clemson campus and the RiSE Community.

Team Leaders
Christopher W. Norfolk Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
962

Robot networks

The technological development of the last decade in robots, computing and communications has led to envisage the design of robotic and automation systems consisting of networked vehicles, sensors, actuators and communication devices. These developments enable researchers and engineers to design new robotic systems that can interact with human beings and other robots in a cooperative way. Applications span surveillance/monitoring, manufacturing, intelligent vehicles, exploration, and many others. In this project, we will explore some basics of robot networks and build robotic cooperation using several intelligent ground robots available in the lab. No knowledge of distributed dynamical systems or robotics is needed.

Team Leaders
Yongqiang Wang Electrical & Computer Engr
Accomplishments
NSF Award Abstract #1738902 CICI: RSARC: Secure Time for Cyberinfrastructure Security
Wang, Y. (2016, May). $10,000. "A Summer Camp for Video-game Based Control Learning for Middle-School Girls" Control Systems Society Outreach Fund. IEEE. http://ieeecss.org/sites/ieeecss.org/files/A_Summer_Camp_For_Video_Game_Based_Control_Learning_Report.pdf
IEEE Control Systems Society , 10K
Mulqueen, D., and Wang, Y. (2017, August) Undergraduate Creative Inquiry of Swarm Robotics: Communication Methods. Paper Presentation at The 3rd International Conference on Control Science and Systems Engineering, Beijing, China
*Bear, E., *Maxwell, T., Anglea, T., *Raval, D., *Buckley, I., & Wang, Y. (2016). An undergraduate research platform for cooperative control and swarm robotics. In 2016 IEEE 11th Conference on Industrial Electronics and Applications (ICIEA). IEEE. https://doi.org/10.1109/iciea.2016.7603893
Wang, Y., *Maxwell, T., *Bear, E., & Anglea, T. (2016). A unified communication and control approach for decentralized heading alignment in robot networks. In 2016 Chinese Control and Decision Conference (CCDC). IEEE. https://doi.org/10.1109/ccdc.2016.7531413
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
585

Research in Digital Media & Learning

Research in Digital Media & Learning gives students the opportunity to work as individuals or part of interdisciplinary teams to enact research that focuses on the intersection between digital media and learning. This CI is interest-driven, meaning that students should come with their own ideas about what they would like to investigate. Ideal candidates would be from any field, as long as their interests involve digital media and learning in some way. Students will be encouraged to present their work at a research conference and the Clemson FoCI conference.

Team Leaders
D. Matthew Boyer Education & Human Dev
Andrew Robb School of Computing
Ryan Visser Education & Human Dev
Accomplishments
Boyer, D. M., & *Smith, J. E. (2016). Using course opportunities for learning game design. On the Horizon, 24(1), 104–111. https://doi.org/10.1108/oth-08-2015-0039
*Roman, J., *Vargas, P., Boyer, D. M., Qian, M. (2014). ICLEP: Interactive Cases for Learning Educational Psychology. Paper to be presented at the Advances in Educational Psychology Conference. Fairfax, VA.
College of EducationE
1540

Using Magnetic Nanoparticles to Prevent Restenosis

Aging, smoking, diet, and genetic factors cause the build up of plaque in the arteries that provide nutrients to the heart, which is a major cause of heart attacks. To solve this problem, stents are commonly used to open the artery back up. In some cases, when a stent is inserted, it injures the walls of the blood vessel causing it to swell and block the blood vessel back up. In recent years, medicated stents have been used to deliver medication that reduces that swelling by reducing the growth and spreading of the cells that cause the problem. In doing that, they also stop the healing process of the injury site, which causes delayed effects like blood clots that block the artery. We designed a magnetic nanoparticle coated with heparin. Heparin is a drug that is naturally found in the body. It is known to stop the swelling in the wall of the blood vessel and accelerate the healing process. We have tested these nanoparticles on cells and mice to show that they are not toxic. We have started to test their effect on the cell growth and spreading to show that they are effective as a treatment option. We plan to deliver that nanoparticles to the stent using a magnetic field similar to the ones used in MRI imaging. This project would advance the treatment of blocked arteries without causing new problems. In doing so, we would eliminate the need for multiple surgeries to treat the complications. This helps save patients from complications associated with stent implantation and help patients live healthier lives. 

Team Leaders
Nardine Ghobrial Bioengineering
Delphine Dean Bioengineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
566

Identifying, Cloning and Characterizing Nodule Regulatory Mutants

The lab focuses on understanding how the shoots and roots of plants communicate with each other at the molecular level, using mutants in a process called nodulation to determine what genes and proteins are involved in long-distance signaling. The project involves DNA, RNA, and protein work as well as mapping & cloning genes.

Team Leaders
Julia Frugoli Genetics and Biochemistry
Elise Schnabel Genetics and Biochemistry
Accomplishments
*Corbett, C., Schnabel, E., Frugoli, J. (2019, April). Identification of a new mutant in the autoregulation of nodulation regulatory pathway in Medicago truncatula. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Frugoli, J., Schnabel, E & *Corbett, C. (2018, April 2-3) "Identification of a genetic suppressor of hypernodulating phenotypes" Presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
Patel, M. (2017 Dec.)  "ACR4 and CLE Expression." Presented to the Department of Genetics & Biochemistry for Honors Thesis, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Corbett, C., Chaulagain, D., Schnabel, E. L. and Frugoli, J. A. (2017, April 8-10). "Screening Medicago truncatula Tnt1 insertion lines for mutants in the Autoregulation of Nodulation pathway." Poster presented at the Southern Section meeting of the American Society of Plant Biologists, Orlando, FL.
*Chiu, C., *Patel, M., Nowak, S., Schnabel, E., and Frugoli, J. (2017, April 9). Novel M. truncatula CLE peptides in nodule regulation. Poster presented at Southern Section Meeting of the American Society for Plant Biologists, Orlando, FL.
Nowak,S., Kassaw,T., *Flanagan, B., *Patel,T., Schnabel, E., Frugoli, J.(2016, July).  "Root derived signaling: Arabinosylation of peptides and their role in Medicago truncatula nodule regulation." invited talk for the the national ASPB meeting, Austin, TX.
*Castello, A. (2016). "Solving the Mystery of the Silenced Gene." Presented at the Genetics & Biochemistry honors presentation
*Kotwis, K., Crook, A., Schnabel, E., Frugoli, J. (2015, March 28-30). Is there TOO MUCH LOVE in Medicago truncatula nodule regulation? poster presented at the Souther Section meeting of the American Society for Plant Biologists, Dauphin Island, AL.
*Castelloe, A., Crook, A., Schnabel, E., Frugoli, J. (2015). A Forward Genetic Approach to Unraveling a Genetic Pathway: Mapping Suppressor Screen Mutants. Poster presented at the Southern Section meeting of the American Association for Plant Biology, Dauphin Island, AL.
*Flanagan, B., *Puncheon, A., Crook, A., Kasswa, T., Schnabel, E. Frugoli, J. (2013, February). Identifying, Cloning, and Characterizing Nodule Regulatory Mutants. Presented at a poster for the Life Sciences Facility Dedication, Clemson, SC.
*Flanagan, B., Kassaw, T., Schnabel, E., Frugoli, J. (2014). The role of Hydroxyproline Arabinosyl Transferases (HPATs) in Arabidopsis. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Section of the American Society of Plant Biologists, Lexington KY.
*Kotwis, K., *Rummler, L., Crook, A., Schnabel, E., Frugoli, J. (2014). A Molecular Approach to the Autoregulation of Nodulation: Genes and Hormones. A poster for the Southern Section Meeting of the American Society for Plant Biologists, Lexington, KY.
*Manushi Patel, the CI team member who could not go to the Orlando conference, received an NSF REU supplement of $4500 through my grant to continue her work through the summer.
*Cameron Corbett was selected as an Adobe Fellow for the summer
*Ashley Castelloe will be attending The Ohio State University to earn her PhD in Molecular Biology.*Tarek Patel will be apply for medical school in the fall.
Frugoli, J., (2012, March). Be Careful What You Wish For: Research Ethics Education in the University Setting, A Response to NIH and NSF Regulations. Teaching Ethics, 12(2), 103-105.
Kassaw, T., Frugoli, J. (2012, September). Simple and efficient methods to dissect long-distance signaling in Medicago truncatula and other small plants. Plant Methods, 8(38).
Schnabel, E., Karve, A., Kassaw, T., Mukherjee, A., Zhou, X., Hall, T., Frugoli, J. (2012, January). The M. truncatula SUNN gene is expressed in vascular tissue, similarly to RDN1, consistent with the role of these nodulation regulation genes in long distance signaling. Plant Signaling and Behavior, 7(1), 4-6.
Schnabel, E., Kassaw, T., Smith, L., Marsh, J., Oldroyd, G., Long, S., Frugoli, J. (2011, July). ROOT DETERMINED NODULATION 1 regulates nodule number in M. truncatula and defines a highly conserved, uncharacterized plant gene family. Plant Physiology, 157, 328-340.
Schnabel, E., Smith, C., Long, S., Frugoli, J. (2010, December). Transcript profiling in M. truncatula lss and sunn-1 mutants reveals different expression profiles despite disrupted SUNN gene function in both mutants. Plant Signaling and Behavior, 5(12), 1657-1659.
Schnabel, E., Mukherjee, A., Smith, L. Kassaw, T., Long, S., Frugoli, J. (2010, November). The lss supernodulation mutant of Medicago truncatula reduces expression of the SUNN gene. Plant Physiology, 154(3), 1390-1402.
College of ScienceG
742

Imaginative Ligands and Unique Metal Complexes: A Marriage of Organic and Inorganic Chemistry

Organic chemists often are puzzled by metals, and inorganic chemists are often puzzled by organic chemistry, but there are great opportunities in uniting the ability of organic chemists to generate complex 3D molecules with the unique reactivities and properties of metals.  This project combines the expertise of an organic chemist and an inorganic chemist to design, synthesize, and examine the metal-coordination properties of ligands for commonly studied metal ions such as iron and copper, as well as more exotic metal ions such as lanthanides uranium, and plutonium (note: undergraduate students will not be working with uranium and plutonium!).  This project uses synthetically versatile new approaches in organic synthesis to generate ligands with applications in biological, catalytic, and nuclear applications.  Once made, a variety of techniques are used to examine the metal coordination abilities of these ligands, including electrochemistry, stability constant determinations, and DNA damage and cellular assays.

Team Leaders
Julia Brumaghim Chemistry
Modi Wetzler Chemistry
Accomplishments
*Baird, H., Brumaghim, J. (2019, April). Using Polyphenol Antioxidants to Reduce Cytotoxic Oxidative Stress in Escherichia Coli. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Pontius, R.K., Sibley, M.M., Wetzler, M. (2017, April) Synthesis of N-​(N'-​(3-​propyl)​-​N''-​methylimidazole-​2-​thione) diethylenetriamine tetraacetic acid for the reduction of nuclear waste. American Chemical Society National Meeting, San Francisco, CA.
Kimani, M., Zimmerman, M., Stadelman, B., Owen, A., Bayse, C., and Brumaghim, J. (2016, October 23-26). "Metal properties control sulfur and selenium antioxidant activity". Presented at the Southeast Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Columbia, SC.
North, A., Sibley, M. M., *Wasilewski, M., and  Wetzler, M. (2016, October 23-26). "Trifluorotoluenesulfonyl as a new nitrogen protecting group" Presented at Southeast Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Columbia, SC.
*Rebecca Pontius received the Barry Goldwater scholarship
Amanda Owen was selected for a prestigious ($10,000) Department of Homeland Security Nuclear Forensics summer internship
*Rebecca Pontius received the Barry Goldwater scholarship
Matt Wasilewski and Rebecca Pontius carefully adding an air-sensitive reagent to a reaction.
College of ScienceG
556

Biology of Lipids and Lipid Droplets in Trypanosomes

We are investigating how the lethal blood parasite Trypanosoma brucei acquires and stores lipids from its host. More specifically, we are investigating the mechanisms of uptake and storage in lipid droplets of fatty acids.

Team Leaders
Kimberly Paul Genetics and Biochemistry
Accomplishments
*Featherstone, E., *Raja, S., Begley, H., *Walkowiak, O., *Pazzo, K., Fowler, K., Jones, C., Winston, B. & Paul, K. (2017, Oct. 19). Fatty Acid Uptake in T. brucei. Poster presented at the annual Cell Biology of Euakryotic Pathogens Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Pazzo, K., *Featherstone, M., Croft, L., Adamson, M., *Raja, S., Begley, H., *Hannah, R. & Paul, K. (2017, Oct. 19). Dramatic Morphological Changes in T. brucei Upon Over-Expression of Lipid Droplet Targeting Proteins. Poster presented at the annual Cell Biology of Eukaryotic Pathogens Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Walkowiak, O. A., *Baron, A., *Metropol, S. G. & Paul, K. S. (2016) A Study of Fatty Acid Uptake and ATP Production in Trypanosoma brucei Parasites. Poster session presented at the 2016 Cell Biology of Eukaryotic Pathogens Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Chetcuti, M. A., *Walker, S. & Paul, K. S. (2016, November) Lipid Droplets in the Trypanosomatid, Crithidia fasciculata. Poster session presented at the 2016 Cell Biology of Eukaryotic Pathogens Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Baron, E.M., *Metropol, S.G., Bauer, S.T., Mattingly, C., Jones, C.H., Winston, B.C., and Paul, K.S. (2014). Fatty Acid Uptake in Trypanosoma brucei. Cell Biology of Eukaryotic Pathogens Symposium.
*Staub, S., Ray, S., and Paul, K. (2013, November) "Allosteric Regulation of the First Step of Fatty Acid Synthesis in African Trypanosomes." Presented at the 2013 Southeastern Regional Lipid Conference.
*Metropol, S., Bauer, S., Mattingly, C., Jones, C., Winston, B., and Paul, K. (2013, October). "Fatty Acid Uptake in the Early Branching Eukaryotic Pathogen, Trypanosoma brucei." Presented at the 2013 Cell Biology of Eukaryotic Pathogens Symposium.
Agata Walkowiak was awarded a 2017-2018 Fellowship from the ACC Fellows Program in Creativity and Innovation.
College of ScienceG
1283

Human Performance Engineering In Health Care: Developing applications in emergency medicine

The Greenville Health System (GHS) is growing to become an academic center in addition to its clinical care given service. The Emergency Medicine Department will open a new residency program in January 2017 which will include a clinical track as well as a research track. This Creative Inquiry will be instrumental in supporting this endeavor and provide theoretic assistance as well as practical engagement with various projects. This collaboration will require students to be able to engage with physicians, residents, and patients at various levels from data collection to present a progress report. The CI yearlong (Fall, Spring and possibly Summer) commitment will enrich the student’s hands-on research experience in healthcare and provide an in-depth knowledge of clinical procedures of emergency medicine.   

Team Leaders
Dotan Shvorin Industrial Engineering
Marissa Shuffler Psychology
Sandra Eksioglu Industrial Engineering
Kevin Taaffe Industrial Engineering
Accomplishments
Shvorin, D., *Smith, A., *Hughes, S., *Adkins, K. (2019, April). Physician Distraction in the Emergency Department. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
703

Alcohol and Other Drugs

This research team is dedicated to researching and helping to reduce the negative impact of alcohol and other drugs on Clemson’s campus. This team will analyze and apply the results of the National College Health Assessment to develop and evaluate alcohol and other drug initiatives. 

Team Leaders
Jennifer Goree Student Health Center
Martha Thompson Public Health Sciences
McKenzie McNamara Student Health Center
Accomplishments
*Atkinson, A., *Baltimore, C., *Bonner, R., *Chea, A., *Giraldo Escobar, K., *Howell, B., *Zwolski, M., Fulmer, C., McNamara, M. (2019, April). Alcohol and Other Drug Misuse Among College Students. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Smith, L., *Andrews, L., *Arms, C., *Dipasquale, J., *Graham, J., *Henson, H., *Loiselle, A., & Polomski, J. (2017). National College Health Assessment Data 2010-2016. Presentation, Office of Advocacy and Success at Clemson University, Clemson, SC. 
*Smith, L., *Andrews, L., *Arms, C., *Dipasquale, J., *Graham, J., *Henson, H., *Loiselle, A., & Polomski, J. (2017). Promoting health on Clemson’s campus. Presentation, Focus on Creative Inquiry Symposium.
1545

Mild to Moderate Cognitive Impairment and the Application of the MindSet Program

Mild to moderate cognitive impairment is a diagnosis many people experience later in their life that is debilitating to both the patients and caregiver’s quality of life. Researchers in Florida developed the MindSet program with the goal of improving the lives of both patient and caregiver who find themselves confronted with mild to moderate cognitive decline. This study is an investigation on the MindSet program and implementation of the program here in the upstate of South Carolina. You must be graduating no earlier than May 2020 to participate in this study.

Team Leaders
Kathleen Valentine School of Nursing
Eleanor Petyak
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
709

The development of critical thinking in undergraduates

We conduct a continuing series of experimental and non-experimental studies examining the assessment and development of of critical thinking skills in undergraduates.  Team members review relevant literature, design the studies, collect data, analyze the data, and present the results and conclusions at local, regional, and international research meetings.

Team Leaders
Benjamin R Stephens Psychology
Accomplishments
Stephens, B.R., *Grier, K., *Mckinney, M. & *Mcwhite, C. (2018, June 4-6). Does a Psychology Research Methods Course Enhance Critical Thinking?. Invited presentation at Clemson University CT2 Faculty Institute, Clemson, SC.
*Nelson, H., *Grier, K., *Mckinney, M., *Mcwhite, C. & Stephens, B.R. (2018, April 2-3). Does a Psychology Research Methods Course Enhance Critical Thinking? Poster presentation at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Irvin, E., *Seo, H., Stephens, B. (2017, April). Teaching Induction and Deduction: Effect of Class Size. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Brewer, V.*, Pittman, R.*, Stevens, D. *, Yockel, K. *, and Stephens, B. (2017, March). Teaching Induction and Deduction for our QEP. Poster session accepted at the meetings of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Atlanta, GA.
*Beesburg, C., *Brewer, V., *Carney, A., *Dicke, C., *Pittman, R., *Schneider, A., *Stevens, D., *Yockel, K., Stephens, B. (2016, March). Teaching Induction and Deduction for our QEP. FOCI, Clemson University.
*Dicke, C., *Beesburg, C., *Brewer, V., *Carney, A., *Flynn, M., *Pittman, M., *Staples, A., *Cox, A., Stephens, B. (2016, March). Teaching Induction and Deduction for Our QEP. Poster presented at the meetings of the Southeastern Psychological Association, New Orleans.
*Stebbins, C, *Cole, M., *Cox, A., *Kennedy, S., *Overdyk, M., Stephens, B. (2015) Critical Thinking: Undergraduate Views and an Intervention. Presented at SEPA, Hilton Head.
*Bogart, L., *Carney, A., *Cox, A., *Dicke, C., *Overdyk, M., *Samour, M., *Staples, A., Stephens, B. (2015). Critical Thinking. Presented at FOCI, Clemson.
*Webb, M., *Leland, E., *Huddleston, S., *Kennedy, S., *Cole, M., *Overdyk, M., *Fields, R., *Heard, N., *Laxgang, V., *Stephens,, J., Stephens, B. (2014, April). Undergraduate views of critical thinking. Poster presented at the Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Leland, E., Baskett, T., Cooper, C., Egglefield, D., Kirk, K., Lucas, L., O'Hara, C., Stephens, B. (2014, April). Undergraduate views of the structure and value of the Clemson general education ePortfolio. Poster presented at the Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
715

Beaches and Deserts: The microbial cycling of iron and other nutrients and their importance to healthy ecosystems.

Microbes are responsible for numerous ecosystem functions processes. These functions and processes include the reduction and oxidation of biogenic metals as well as changing the form of non-metallic nutrients such as nitrogen. We seek to understand the microbes and their communities involved in these processes in arid and coastal ecosystems.

Team Leaders
Harry Kurtz Jr Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Lee, H. & Taylor, H. (2017). Nitrogen cycling in intertidal beach sands along the Grand Strand area of South Carolina. Presentation, 81st Annual Meeting of SCASM, Francis Marion University, Marion, SC.
*Haire, L. M., *Funk, C., *Weyman, M. & *Corley, M. (2017) Initial characterization of six previously uncultured bacteria isolated from a desert ecosystem. Presentation, 81st Annual Meeting of SCASM, Francis Marion University, Marion, SC.
Tollman, C.D.  Kurtz, Jr., HD. (2016, April 2). Kinetic Analysis of Ammonium Oxidation on Five Beaches on the Mid-Atlantic Seaboard. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the SC Branch of the American Society for Microbiology, Charleston, SC.
*Lee, H.M., *Hundzinski, C.M. & Kurtz, Jr., H.D. (2016, April 2). Measuring the Effective Change in Conditions in Ammonium Oxidizers in Beach Sands Caused by Contaminants Associated with Recreational Activities. Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the SC Branch of the American Society for Microbiology, Charleston, SC.
Taylor, H. B. & Kurtz, Jr., H. D. (2016, April 2). Diversity and Activity of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria in Beach Sands along the Eastern Seaboard. Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the SC Branch of the American Society for Microbiology, Charleston, SC.
*Taylor, H.B., Kurtz, H. (2016). Diversity and activity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria in beach sands along the eastern seaboard. Presented at the South Carolina Branch of ASM meeting at MUSC, Charleston SC (April 9).
*Kaur, S., Kurtz, H. (2016). Role of microbes in coloring and stabilization of the sandstone outcrops in Colorado Plateau, USA. Presentation, 2016 meeting of the Southeastern Section of the Geological Society of America. Columbia, SC (April 1).
*Tollman, C.D. (2016, April 9). Kinetic Analysis of Ammonium Oxidation on Five Beaches on the Mid-Atlantic Seaboard. Presented at the SCASM branch meeting, Charleston, SC.
*Eyo, E., *Haire, M.L. (2016, April 9). Initial characterization of nine previously uncultured bacteria isolated from a desert ecosystem. Presentation, SCASM branch meeting, Charleston, SC (April 9).
*Lee, H.M., *Hundzinski, C. (2016). Measuring the effective change in conditions in ammonium oxidizers in beach sands caused by contaminants associated with recreational activities. Presentation,  Annual Meeting of SCASM, Charleston, SC (April 9).
*Tollman, C., *Taylor, H., Kurtz, H. (2015). The kinetics of ammonium oxidation in coastal beaches. Presentation, SC Branch ASM Meeting (April 11).
*Taylor, H., Kurtz, H. (2015, April 11). Microbial diversity within the intertidal zone of four east coast beaches. Presentation, SC Branch ASM Meeting (April 11).
*Kaur, S., Kurtz, H. (2015). Illumina-based amplicon sequencing analysis of cryptoendolithic bacterial communities in sandstones of an arid region. Presentation, SC Branch ASM Meeting (April 11).
*Xavier, S., *Eyo, E., *Lee, H., Kurtz, H. (2015). Concentration of ferrous iron, ammonium and nitrite on coastal beaches. Presentation, SC Branch ASM Meeting (April 11).
College of ScienceG
719

Hands on Tissue Engineering:

Tissue engineering is an emerging field -- the fabrication on human tissues that can alleviate the shortage of tissue/organ donation. Our group works on the fabrication of brain-like training models and R&D (research and development) of novel devices to create composite materials with specialized properties for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. 

Team Leaders
Jorge Rodriguez Mechanical Engineering
Delphine Dean Bioengineering
Adam Samuta
Accomplishments
*Samuta, A., *Magee, K., *Fletcher, M., *Mckeehan, J., *Veideman, E., Korneva, G., Lee, J., Rodriguez, J. (2019, April). Optimization of an Electrospinning Mechanism to Apply Protein-Treated Fibers to Surgical Sutures. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Cavrak, M., *Keating, E., *Sama, V., Navarro, M., Dean, D. & Rodriguez-Devora, J. (2018, April 11-14) "Haptic As-sessment of Neurosurgical Model of the Brain and Nerves." Presented at the Society For Biomaterials 2018 Annual Meeting and Exposition: Exploring the Nexus of Research and Application, Atlanta, GA.
*Abdeladl, O., *Cavrak, M., *DiGangi, D., *Hannam, J., *Magee, K., *Samuta, A., *Branco, R., *Keating, E., Dean, D. & Rodriguez, J. (2018, April 2-3) 3D Printing of Eloquent Structures for Preoperative Surgical Planning. Presented at the 13th Annual Focus of Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Tharp, P., *Branco, R., *Dale, S., *Keating, E., Navarro, M. & Rodríguez-Dévora, J.I. (2017) 3D Printed Brain Model for Preoperative Planning and Practice. Poster Presented at the 3rd annual BMES/FDA Frontiers in Medical Devices Conference, Washington, DC, (May).
*Tharp, P., *Branco, R., *Keating, E., *Dale, S., Rodriguez, J., Dean, D. (2017). Development of a brain model for neurosurgery pre-operative planning and training stage II: Integration of cerebrovascular sytem. Presentation, Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Stewart, A*; Holmes, S*; Wortkoetter, J*; Desai, A; Rodriguez, J; Dean, D (2015, October) Characterization of Mechanical Properties of Chondrocyte Spheroids. Presentation, 2015 Sigma Xi Annual meeting and student research conference. Kansas City, MO.
Navarro, M., *Cotton, B., *Stewart, A., Joseph, J., Dean, D. & Rodriguez, J. (2016, May 19-21) 3D Printed Brain Model for Improved Preoperative Planning. Poster presented at the 10th Annual Southeastern Medical Device Association (SEMDA) 2016 Conference, Nashville, TN
*Cotton, B., *McGreevey, J., Navarro, M., Joseph, J., Dean, D. & Rodriguez, J.I. (2016). 3D Printed Brain Model for Practice and Preoperative Planning. Presented at the GHS Poster Research Day, Greenville, SC.
*Cotton, B., *Repp, M., Navarro, M., Desai, A., Joseph, J., Dean, D. & Rodriguez, J. (2015, October 23-24) 3D Printed Brain Model for Improved Preoperative Planning. Poster presented at Sigma Xi, International Research Conference, Kansas City, MIssouri.
*Arthur, C., *Demos, C., *Garzon, K., *Holmes, J.S., *Jones, C., *Repp, M., *Stastny, A. & *Wortkoetter, J. (2015, April 6). Exploration in Novel Tissue Engineering Methods. Poster Presentation at the 10th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Holmes, J., *Arthur, C., *Wortkoetter, J., *Jones, C., *Stastny, A., *Gorrell, L., *Johnson, K., Rodriguez, J. & Dean, D. (2014, April 3). Exploring tissue engineering. Poster presented at the 9th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Arthur, C., *Stastny, A., *Jones, C., *Saul, O., Dean, D. & Rodriguez-Devora, J. (2013) Using Photovoltaic Surfaces for Cell Culture. Poster Presented at Biomaterials Symposium at Clemson University. Clemson, SC.
*Gorrell, L., *Holmes, S., *Johnson, K., *Wortkoetter, J., Dean, D. & Rodriguez-Devora, J. (2013). The Effect of Spheroid Culturing Techniques on Cell Viability. Poster Presented at Biomaterials Symposium at Clemson University. Clemson, SC.
*Holmes, S., *Wortkoetter, J., *Gorrell, L., *Johnson, K., Dean, D. & Rodriguez, J. (2014) Analysis and Development of Spheroid Cell Culture Techniques. Presented at the Annual Biomedical Engineering (BMES) meeting, San Antonio, TX.
*Brittney Cotton and *Madison Repp were recognized by Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society for their Superior research poster presentation entitled “3D Printed Brain Model for Improved Presurgical Planning” in the Society’s 2015 International Research Conference that took place at the Sheraton Crown Center in Kansas City, MO from October 23-25, 2015
Tissue Engineering group in lab
Biomaterials Day Team - Novel 2D culture
Poster Presentation
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
741

Marine Conservation and Genetics

Over-fishing, pollution, and habitat destruction are among the major issues affecting marine life and habitats. Marine ornamental crustaceans, i.e., wild caught species sought by aquarium hobbyists due to their aesthetic value (e.g., bright coloration) and/or ability to control/eliminate aquarium pests, are particularly impacted by over-fishing and habitat destruction and do require immediate attention.             The ornamental fishery, a well-established multi-million dollar industry, often operates unnoticed due to their niche market, the frequency of product export, and the diminutive size of the target organisms. Little attention has been paid to them and they have been managed based on little to no life history information. The marine aquarium trade relies predominantly on wild caught species with > 90% taken from coral reefs and associated habitats. The industry has increased dramatically in recent years with a distinct focus on crustaceans (and other invertebrates) that provide “ecosystem services” for aquaria (control of aquarium pests). As these organisms are harvested for the services they can provide in an aquarium, those services are potentially lost from the ecosystem.             Immediately after corals, crustaceans represent the most heavily traded ornamental marine invertebrate worldwide. Basic life history information critical to manage any fishery with the goal of sustainability is largely absent. Furthermore, the mislabeling of the species traded in the industry is rampant. The development of a genetic (COI and/or 16S) barcode for this economically and ecologically important group of shrimps is warranted for achieving the goal of fishery sustainability.             This Creative Inquiry project aims at generating basic life history information about the most intensively traded species in the western Atlantic (e.g., shrimps from the genera Thor, Lysmata and Periclimenes, and crabs from the species complex Mithrax-Mithraculus). Furthermore, this project will setup the bases for the development of a genetic barcode for the most heavily harvested ornamental crustaceans.

Team Leaders
Juan Antonio Baeza Migueles Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Major, R. and Baeza, J. (2017). Monogamy and sexual dimorphism in the shrimp Periclemenes rathbunae, living in symbiosis with the sun sea anemone Stychodactyla helianthus. Presentation, Benthic Ecology Meeting 2017, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina (April 12-16). 
*Steedman, S., Prakash, S., Behringer, D., Baeza, A. (2017). Reproductive performance and mating system in the isopod Parabopyrella lata, a parasitic castrator of the shrimp Lysmata boggessi. Presentation, Benthic Ecology Meeting 2017, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina (April 12-16). 
*Simpson, L., Ambrosio, L.J., Baeza, J.A. (2016). Sexual dimorphism in the pygmy spider crab, Petramithrax pygmaeus, and testing a macroevolutionary trend in growth in the superfamily Majoidea. 2016 South Eastern Ecological Conference, Tallahassee, Florida, USA. 
*Simpson, L., *Major, R., Ambrosio, L.J., Baeza, J.A. (2016). Sexual dimorphism in the pygmy spider crab, Petramithrax pygmaeus, and a test of Rensch's Rule in the superfamily Majoidea. 2016 Benthic Ecology Meeting, Portland, Maine, USA. 
Baeza, J. A., *Simpson, L., Ambrosio, L.J. (2016). Active parental care, reproductive performance, and a novel egg predator affecting fecundity in the Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus. 2016 Benthic Ecology Meeting, Portland, Maine, USA. 
*Johnson, C.A. & Baeza, J.A. (2015, March 13-16). Exploring the effect of phyletic dwarfism on the static allometry of reproductive traits: Fecundity, Egg Size, and Reproductive Output in the Pygmy Spider Crab Mithrax pygmaeus . Poster presented at the The Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference (SEEC), Athens, GA.
*Hemphill, C., *Brownell, C., Charlton, H. & Baeza, J.A. (2014, March) The lifestyle and sexual dimorphism of the symbiotic shrimp Ascidonia katoi suggests a polygamous mating system. Poster presented at the Annual Benthic Ecology Meeting 2014, Jacksonville, FL.
*Simpson, L., Ambrosio, L., & Baeza, J. (2016). Sexual Dimorphism and Allometric Growth in the Enigmatic Pygmy Crab Petramithrax Pygmaeus (Bell, 1836) (Decapoda: Brachyura: Mithracidae), with a Formal Test of Rensch’s Rule in Spider Crabs (Superfamily Majoidea). Journal Of Crustacean Biology, 36(6), 792-803. http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1937240x-00002486
Baeza, J. A., Hemphill, C. A., & Ritson-Williams, R. (2015). The Sexual and Mating System of the Shrimp Odontonia katoi (Palaemonidae, Pontoniinae), a Symbiotic Guest of the Ascidian Polycarpa aurata in the Coral Triangle. PLOS ONE, 10(3), e0121120. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0121120
*Simpson, L.A., & Baeza, J.A. (2014). Does Rench's rule apply to marine invertebrates?: A formal test of predictions using the Crustacea as a model system. 'Modern Phylogenetic Comparative Methods and their use in Evolutionary Biology' Meeting, Sevilla, Spain. Runner up to best student poster price at the Meeting 'Modern Phylogenetic Comparative Methods and their Application in Evolutionary Biology', Seville, Spain.
College of ScienceG
1610

Visual exploration of scientific data (SciVis contest)

This Creative Inquiry aims at exploring scientific data by means of interactive visualization techniques. The project is developed in conjunction with the SciVis contest, a visualization challenge hosted every year at the IEEEVIS conference (http://ieeevis.org/).Students should expect to enroll in the CI project for 2 semesters. During the Fall semester, students will learn the basics of scientific visualization by working with Paraview. During the Spring semester, students will develop a new project based on the dataset published in the SciVis contest. High-quality projects will be submitted to the SciVis contest and, if accepted, students will have the chance to attend the IEEE VIS conference for presenting their work.

Team Leaders
Federico Iuricich School of Computing
Oyewole Oyekoya CCIT CITI
Mehrdad Yousefi
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1612

Death Valley Entertainment

Death Valley Entertainment is a research and practicum based community of practice focusing on the incubation and development of recording artists, industry professionals, and creatives. The goal of DVE is to give students an opportunity to practice research-based methods in the interdisciplinary realms of the music and media industry. Through peer-mentoring, problem-solving, project management and research, students will develop their skills and offer solutions that improve the state of the music industry, media industry, and evolving music scene at Clemson University. DVE seeks to be a launchpad for local artists and future industry leaders who will be viewed by others as highly effective, talented, and knowledgable professionals.

Team Leaders
Chad Navis Management
Christopher Hancock
Nicholas Holman
College of BusinessD
756

Biochemical analysis of homologous recombination and DNA repair

Our laboratory studies the mechanism behind the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). If not repaired, a DSB can result in genome instability and potentially, cancer. DSBs are caused by exposure to chemicals, radiation, oxidative reactive species generated during normal metabolism and damaged replication forks. The repair of DSBs often involves the homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathway. The heart of HR is the RAD51 and DMC1 recombinase. These enzymes catalyze the search for homology between the damaged DNA and the sister chromatid. The activity of the recombinases is modulated by a number of accessory proteins. We utilize a combination of molecular biological and biochemical techniques to determine the role these accessory proteins have in the modulation of RAD51 and DMC1 recombinase activity. The results of our studies will provide insight into the mechanistic underpinnings of HR and genome maintenance.

Team Leaders
Michael Sehorn Genetics and Biochemistry
Accomplishments
*Sarah Waldvogel was selected as the Outstanding Junior in the College of Science.
Kelso, A. A., Goodson,  S. D., Chavan, S., Say, A. F., Turchick, A., Sharma, D., Ledford, L. L., *Ratterman, E., Leskoske, K., King, A. V., Attaway, C. C., Bandera, Y., Foulger, S. H., Mazin, A. V., Temesvari, L. A., and Sehorn, M. G. (2016). Characterization of the recombination activities of the Entamoeba histolytica Rad51 recombinase. Molecular And Biochemical Parasitology, 210(1-2), 71-84. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molbiopara.2016.09.001
Kelso, A. A., Goodson, S. D., *Watts, L. E., Ledford, L. L, *Waldvogel, S. M., *Diehl, J. N., Shah, S. B., Say, A. F., *White, J. D., and Sehorn, M. (2016). The β-isoform of BCCIP promotes ADP release from the RAD51 presynaptic filament and enhances homologous DNA pairing. Nucleic Acids Research, 45(2), 711-725.doi:10.1093/nar/gkw877.
College of ScienceG
762

Exploring New Materials for Advanced Lithium Ion Battery Applications

New materials will be explored for longer life and greater capacity of the next generation batteries. Metal-organic framework (MOF) solids are known for its propensity in host-guest chemistry relevant to gas absorption, ion-exchange, catalysis and cathode applications, to just name a few. Participants of Creative Inquiry project will learn the fundamental electrochemical (e-chem) skills and, with my supervision, are encouraged to formulate their own work in the exploration of MOF solids. We will employ the water-soluble polyoxometalates along with organic amines to build new MOFs through the e-chem synthesis at room temperature. The resulting solids will be subject to ion-exchange reactions and surface area analysis. We anticipate that new solids featuring open-framework structures suitable for electrode applications will result.

Team Leaders
Shiou-jyh Hwu Chemistry
Accomplishments
Hess, S., *Alvarez, N., *Lefort, C., *Jiang, X. (2017, April). Joining the Resistance: Microbial Presence and Antibiotic Resistance in Student Exercising Environments. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Sulejmanovic, D., Campbell, M., Raval, Y., *Anayee, M., Whitehead, D., Tzeng, J., Hwu, S. (2016). "Water-soluble Polyoxometalates: Synthetic Strategies and Applications." Department of Chemistry, Annual Research Symposium. 
College of ScienceG
763

Exploring New Magnetic Solids for Quantum Computing and Information Storage

Exploring new magnetic materials revealing quantum tunneling phenomenon for the next generation quantum computing. A new class of inorganic solids will be synthesized by high-temperature (<500 oC) solid state methods. A typical example can be seen in one of our recent publications (Chem. Mater. 2014, 26, 1502-1504) where the synthesis of magnetic nanostructures in condensed matter is shown feasible for the formation of desired quantum tunneling phenomenon. The resulting new solids will be subject to single crystal X-ray diffraction studies, UV-vis spectroscopic analysis, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. We anticipate temperature-independent magnetic relaxation, a signature phenomenon for quantum tunneling, will be observed in these new magnetic insulators.

Team Leaders
Shiou-jyh Hwu Chemistry
Accomplishments
*Ondus, J., *Talbert, J. & Hwu, S. (2017, March 4). "Computational Study of Complex Salt Formation." Presented at the Annual Chemistry Department Research Symposium, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
Shen, Y.; Sulejmanovic, D.; Malone, G. & Hwu, S.-J. (2016, March) Inorganic-Organic Hybrids – Crystal Assembly via Non-conventional Bonding, Poster Presentation at the Chemistry Department Annual Research Symposium.
*Malone, G., Shen, Y., Htet, Y., Sulejmanovice, D., Tennyson, A., Hwu, S.J. (2016). "Inorganic-Organic Hybrids – Crystal Assembly via Non-conventional Bonding." Department of Chemistry, Annual Research Symposium.
College of ScienceG
765

Engineering the Intervertebral Disc

Herniation and degeneration of the intervertebral discs (IVDs) in our spine can cause significant pain, disability and economic burden on a global scale. Current surgical strategies to repair and restore function to the IVDs have limitations. Regenerative medicine-based approaches for IVD repair and regeneration using stem cells and scaffolds hold significant promise, however to date an ideal scaffold that mimics the complex micro-architecture, biochemistry and mechanical properties of the entire IVD has yet to be developed. Previously, our CI has created a composite scaffold derived from cow tail IVDs that have had all the cow cells removed. The scaffolds have demonstrated similar physico-chemical properties compared to human IVDs and they support stem cell viability in vitro. Thus, the continued focus of the CI is to develop approaches to efficiently repopulate the scaffold with stem cells and to assess tissue regeneration on the IVD scaffold.

Team Leaders
Jeremy Mercuri Bioengineering
Accomplishments
*Rood, C., *Randall, H., *Hannah, L., *Krussig, M., Mercuri, J., Simionescu, D. (2019, April). Development and Analysis of a Tissue Engineered Intervertebral Disc Xenograft Scaffold. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Hensley, A., *Rames, J., *Doyle, C., *Litzinger, T., *Watt, T., *Wyman, N., Fernandez, C. & Mercuri, J. (2017, April 5). “Development of a fully decellularized bovine caudal intervertebral disc scaffold.” Presented at the 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Compton, C., *Lehane, A., *Rames, J., *Skelly, M., *Hensley, A. & Mercuri, J. (2015, April 6). 'Development of a Novel Biological Intervertebral Dsic Scaffold'. Poster presentation at the 10th annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC
Bovine caudal IVD harvestd by the creative inquiry students (side view).
Bovine tail intervertebral disc harvested by creative inquiry (top view).
Engineering the Intervertebral Disc creative inquiry students snap freezing their bovine discs using liquid nitrogen.
Engineering the intervertebral disc creative inquiry students hard at work in the the laboratory of Orthopaedic Tissue Regeneration & Orthobiologics.
Cross-section of a Bovine Caudal IVD illustrating the nucleus pulposus region (center), surrounding annulus fibrosus and end-plates (inferior and superior).
Bovine Caudal IVD's without (top two) and with (bottom 2) endplates.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1544

Health Literacy in the American Sign Language Community

This CI is designed to explore ways to alleviate the communication barriers between healthcare systems and the deaf people who use American Sign Language (ASL). Through conducting research in the community, the researchers analyze a variety of data and information that addresses the existing health literacy issues being provided in ASL for deaf people. The purpose of this is to ensure that these individuals have the access to information pertaining to awareness about health welfare. The goal of this research is to create a better understanding for delivering health and medical information via ASL for deaf people with different educational backgrounds and to ultimately break down the prevailing communication barriers that they face in today's society. 

Team Leaders
Jody Cripps Languages
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
786

Engineering for Modern Healthcare

The goal of this CI is to develop a method to organize hospital stockrooms using a color-coding scheme that can be used universally throughout various hospitals and stockrooms.

Team Leaders
Delphine Dean Bioengineering
Hannah Cash Bioengineering
Accomplishments
Cash, H., *Seawell, T., *Colborn, E., *Gilmore, S. (2019, April). Color-Coding Organization Scheme to Improve Hospital Stockrooms. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Cash, H., Dean, D., *Long, K., *Maad, H., *O'Neill, K., *Bergamasco, G., Gainey, K. (2017, April). Color-Coding for Hospital Stockrooms. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Ford, A., *Parekh, D., *Shaw, E., *Hobbs, M., *Harper, N., *Zadeh, S., Gainey, K. (2014, April). A cross-discipline approach to healthcare needs. Poster presented at the Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
789

Generation and Characterization of Radiation for Biomedical Applications

In recent years there has been a strong growth in the number of medical devices that use different types of radiation for treatment and imaging applications. There is also a growing interest in different fields ( e.g. medicine, biology, space research, electronics) to understand and utilize the effects of different forms of radiation. The effectiveness of radiation technology depends on the understanding of the interaction with the materials in question ranging from surfaces of solids to biological soft tissues.   The present research project lies on the borderline of physics and biology. The elementary physical processes of the interaction are well known, but their expressions in biological samples depend on the complex response of the system and its environment. Students in this project will explore different techniques to generate, detect, and characterize electromagnetic radiation, their uses in specialized medical devices, and their applications in research.    

Team Leaders
Delphine Dean Bioengineering
Endre Takacs Physics and Astronomy
Accomplishments
*Napolitano, J., Chowdhury, A., *Aduma, K., *Garvey, R., *Hill, M., *Keller, R., *Petty, C., *Rifkin, A., Takacs, E., Dean, D. (2019, April). The Effect of Low Dose Radiation on Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Baginski, B., *Bradley, S., *Truong, K., Takacs, E. & Dean, D. (2017, April 3-4). The effects of low-dose radiation on various cell types. Presented at the 12th annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Symposium, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Truong, K., *Bradley, S., Rusin, M., Takacs, E. & Dean, D. (2016, October). The cell response of 7F2 Osteoblasts to low-dose radiation. Presented at the 2016 Annual Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) meeting, Minneapolis, MN.
*Baginski, B., *Brandenburg, K., *Caruso, S., *Hellyer, A., *Kimmel, T., *Klingenberger, A., *Medlin, D., *Miller, J., Williams, J., *Wilson, R., Wilson, J., Dean, D., Takacs, E., Rusin, M. (2014, April). Generation and characterization of radiation in biomedical applications. Poster presented at the Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
Joey Wilson won the Astronaut Scholarship: http://newsstand.clemson.edu/mediarelations/clemson-bioengineering-student-awarded-astronaut-foundation-scholarship/
Joey Wilson won the Schwartzman Scholarship: http://newsstand.clemson.edu/mediarelations/clemson-senior-joey-wilson-awarded-schwarzman-scholarship-to-china/
*Bryana Baginski won the Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences Scholarship as a direct result of the work she did for CI
1st Place Judged Poster Prize at the 2017 FoCI for *Bryana Baginski, *Suzanne Bradley, *Katelyn Truong
*Truong, K., *Bradley, S., *Baginski, B., Wilson, J., *Medlin, D., Zheng, L., *Wilson, K., Rusin, M., Takacs, E., Dean, D. The effect of well-characterized very low-dose x-ray radiation on fibroblasts. submitted to PLOSOne
*Medlin, D., *Heffron, W., *Siegel, A., *Wilson, K., *Klingenberger, A., *Gall, A., Rusin, M., Dean, D., Takacs, E. (2015, Jan. 11). Development of an x-ray irradiation port for biomedical applications at the CUEBIT facility. Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 583(1).
*Klingenberger, J., *Schott, M., *Medlin, D., *Gall, A., Rusin, M., Dean, D., Takacs, E. (2015, Jan. 11). "Modeling low energy x-ray interactions biological material at the CUEBIT." Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 583(1).
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1546

Science and Values in Environmental and Radiological Health

The objective of this project is to develop effective tools within the context of environmental and radiological health for emphasizing the interwoven nature of science and values and making ethics accessible for everyday decision making. This project also provides an introduction to the responsible conduct of research.

Team Leaders
Nicole Martinez Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
791

Lab-on-a-chip and Microfluidics to identify the cause of disease in clinical diagnostics

We investigate the use of electric fields to identify and separate different strains of Candida cells. This is very important in the context of healthcare diagnostics since Candida is the causative pathogen of candidiasis, a medical condition affecting 46,000 patients yearly in the US with a mortality rate up to 44%. Identifying the strain causing this condition is crucial since front line antibiotics are not necessarily effective on all strains. For example, front line antibiotics commonly used for Candida albicans, the most likely cause of candidiasis, are not effective to eradicate C. glabrata, an emerging pathogen. The technology we are developing is a microfluidic chipset that utilizes a phenomenon known as Dielectrophoresis to selectively trap and detect different strains of Candida. This is uncharted territory and we are generating excellent results in several fronts. Go to www.multiscalemanufacturing.net to see more information

Team Leaders
Rodrigo Martinez-Duarte Mechanical Engineering
Devin Keck Mechanical Engineering
Accomplishments
*Emily Gullette, *Emily Kluttz, *Meredith Hammer and *Natalie Hanson were awarded Honorable Mention in the Poster Session of the Biannual meeting of the Electrochemical Society (ECS) in New Orleans, LA. Poster session featured 70 posters from mostly graduate students. EG, EK, MH and NH were featured in the awards section of Interface, the ECS magazine
*Josie Duncan and *Mary Grace Heustess awarded 3rd place in the Poster Session of the Biannual meeting of the Electrochemical Society (ECS) in New Orleans, LA. Poster session featured 70 posters from mostly graduate students. JD and MGH were featured in the awards section of Interface, the ECS magazine
Gilmore, J., Islam, M., *Duncan, J., Natu, R. and Martinez-Duarte, R. (2017), Assessing the importance of the root mean square (RMS) value of different waveforms to determine the strength of a dielectrophoresis trapping force. ELECTROPHORESIS, 38: 2561–2564. doi:10.1002/elps.201600551
Sparks, J., Islam, M. & Martinez-Duarte, R. (2017, May 30). Towards synthesis of steel foams through carbothermal reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles and renewable biopolymers. Poster presented at the Biannual meeting of the Electrochemical Society, New Orleans, LA.
*Duncan, J., *Hanson, N., *Heustess, M., *Kluttz, E., *Mitchell, F. & Martinez-Duarte, R. (2017, May 30). Studying the Attraction of T. brucei to different materials and landscapes. Poster presented at the Biannual meeting of the Electrochemical Society, New Orleans, LA.
*Gullette, E., *Hanson, N., Kluttz, E., *Stuart, C., *Hammer, M., *Pitman, A., *Wallace, K., Keck, D. & Martinez-Duarte, R. (2017, May 30). Studying the Behavior of T. brucei under Electric Field Gradients Implemented using Optoelectronic Tweezers. Poster presented at the Biannual meeting of the Electrochemical Society, New Orleans, LA.
*Duncan, J, *Gullette, E., *Hammer, M., *Heustess, M., Pitman, A., *Wallace, K., Islam, M. & Martinez-Duarte, R. (2017, May 30). Carbon-electrode Dielectrophoresis for concentrating Trypanosoma Brucei. Poster presented at the Biannual meeting of the Electrochemical Society, New Orleans, LA.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
792

Origami for Carbon-based Multifunctional Materials

Carbonaceous materials such as glassy carbon and metal carbides are widely used as electrodes in many applications including sensors, batteries, and capacitors. The focus of this CI is to derive these materials from renewable resources and elucidate ways to control their structure at multiple length scales, from the nano to the centimeter scale, to tailor their mechanical and electrical performance. The aim is at deriving multifunctional architectures such as structural batteries, sensors and batteries. To this end, we emphasize the use of origami techniques to create complex architectures in pure or doped paper, which we then carbonize at very high temperatures without the presence of oxygen. In this way we can derive complex, porous, lightweight architectures of carbonaceous materials. This is a powerful concept since we can create 3D architectures of engineering value from flat paper films. More details can be found in www.multiscalemanufacturing.net  

Team Leaders
Rodrigo Martinez-Duarte Mechanical Engineering
Accomplishments
Islam, M., *Flach, J. & Martinez-Duarte, R. (2018 July). Carbon origami: A method to fabricate lightweight carbon cellular materials. Carbon, 133, 140-149.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1582

In Vitro Vascular Biology Techniques

This project will consist of learning in vitro techniques needed to work in the field of vascular biology.  The first semester will involve becoming familiar with the skills needed to work independently with primary cells and cell lines commonly used within the vascular biology field.  The second semester will focus on more independent work involving data generation for grants proposals and/or manuscript submissions.  Satisfactory completion of this project will result in the student being competent in directly setting-up well controlled in vitro experiments individually and independently conducting these experiments without any extra assistance from other laboratory personnel.  Specific research projects students would be conducting will be measuring gene expression, protein expression, and cholesterol efflux in untreated and treated endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells.

Team Leaders
Alexis Stamatikos Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
824

Plant biotechnology for use in crop genetic improvement

Abiotic stress, such as salinity, drought, heat, cold and nutritional stress, is the major factor significantly impacting crop production. Understanding molecular mechanisms underlying plant response to various stresses will facilitate development of molecular strategies in genetically engineering crop species with enhanced performance under adverse environmental conditions. In this proposed study, we use molecular genetics and genomics approaches to dissect molecular mechanisms determining plant salt stress response, and will develop molecular strategies using agricultural biotechnology approach to modify candidate genes in transgenic plants producing new cultivars with enhanced salt tolerance. This will lead to genetic improvement of important crop species with enhanced performance under adverse environmental conditions contributing to increasing agricultural productivity.

Team Leaders
Hong Luo Genetics and Biochemistry
Accomplishments
Hong Luo "Genetic engineering of turfgrass for enhanced multi-stress resistance" US Golf Association 02/01/2016 - 1/31/2019. $60,000.
Hong Luo "Methods and compositions for modulating gene expression in plants" Clemson University Research Foundation (CURF) Technology Maturation Fund Program 10/01/2016 - 10/31/2017. $31,808.
Li, Z., Yuan, S., Jia, H., Gao, F., Zhou, M., Yuan, N., Wu, P., Hu, Q., Sun, D. & Luo, H. (2016 September 16) Ectopic expression of a cyanobacterial flavodoxin in creeping bentgrass impacts plant development and confers broad abiotic stress tolerance. Plant Biotechnology Journal 15:433-446.
Mishra, N., Sun, L., Zhu, X., Smith, J., Srivastava, A.P., Yang, X., Pehlivan, N., Esmaeili, N., Luo, H., Shen, G., Jones, D., Auld, D., Burke, J, Payton, P., Zhang, H. (2017, April) Overexpression of the rice SUMO E3 ligase gene OsSIZ1 in cotton enhances drought and heat tolerance, and substantially improves fiber yields in field under reduced irrigation and rain fed conditions. Plant and Cell Physiology 58:735-746.
Hong Luo “Modification of plant stress-related genes in tobacco for enhanced plant performance under adverse environmental conditions” R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company 12/15/2016 - 12/14/2018. $223,516.
College of ScienceG
1599

Creative Leadership

What happens when we bring together the literature on creativity (what it is, who has it, how it functions) with the literature on leadership (what it is, who has it, how to enhance it)? This Creative Inquiry group has two fundamental aims: first, to explore creative approaches and creativity within leadership;  second, to look at concrete examples of  leadership development in the work of social entrepreneurs.

Team Leaders
Diane Perpich Philosophy and Religion
Sarah Mae Cooper Ath Building Maintenance
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
827

Sustainable Landscape Demonstration Garden

   Design, installation, and maintenance are essential to creating a sustainable landscape that is a display or model for education. Sustainability is defined according to the Brundtland report (1987) as the integrated use of social, environmental, and economic approaches to effect positive developmental change. Sustainable Sites Initiative (2009) is a working model for the creation of sustainable landscapes. Sustainable Landscape Demonstration Garden is a project that intends to alter the physical environment and enhance the landscape using environmental and psychological measures through the design and installation of a native plant garden.  Visit Sustainable Landscape Demonstration Web site: http://www.clemson.edu/cafls/demo/  and select "Meet the Team" to view past student experiences.                                   

Team Leaders
Ellen Vincent Plant & Environmental Sciences
Accomplishments
*Anthony, A., Vincent, E. & White, S. (2018 April 4-5). The Sustainable Landscape Demonstration Garden. Poster Presented at the 2018 Clemson Student Research Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Anthony, A., Vincent, E. & White, S. (2018 April 4-5). The Sustainable Landscape Demonstration Garden. Presented at the 2018 Clemson Student Research Forum, Clemson, SC.
Vincent, E. & White, S. (2017, October 16-17). Sustainable Urban Garden- A Replicable Model for Health. Healthy City Design International, Royal Physicians Hall, London, England
Hollifield, K.* (2016, January 21). Sustainable landscape demonstration garden. Presented at the South Carolina Horticulture Industry Annual Conference, Myrtle Beach, SC.
*Busbee, E. (2014, August). From grease to green. South Carolina Nurseryman, 27.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
834

Inter-kingdom communications - studies on C. elegans and bacteria interactions

Bacteria are known to have social behaviors just like the higher organisms. They use special "languages" to talk to each other and make group decisions. The "languages" (or signaling molecules) are small chemical compounds, such as auto-inducers and secondary metabolites, produced and secreted by the bacterial cells. Recent studies have revealed that functions of these signaling molecules are not restricted to communications between bacterial cells, but extend to cross kingdoms, i.e. communications between bacteria and their hosts. In this research, we will use the nematode, C. elegans, as a model to study the inter-kingdom communications. Specifically, we will investigate (1) interactions between bacterial pathogens and C. elegans, and (2) effects of probiotics on C. elegant healthspan.   

Team Leaders
Min Cao Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Lary, S., *Barkley, C., *Russi, K., Bilodeau, M. & Cao, M. (2019, April). The effect of probiotics and alcohol on the development of Caenorhabditis elegans. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Gitto, A. J., *Whitesides, K., *Moore, C., *Patel, K., *Dimery, M., Klees, M. L., Dong, Y. & Cao, M. (2017, April 6) Probiotics and Fat Storage: A C. elegans model. Poster presented at the 13th Annual Focus of Creative Inquiry Poster Forum (FoCI), Clemson, SC.   
*Gitto, A., *Sullivan, J., Klees, M., Dong, Y., Cao, M. (2016) Influence of Probiotics on Fat Storage in Caenorhabditis elegans. Poster presented at the 11th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry, Clemson, SC
Klees, M., *Nguyen, D., *Tran, S., *Gitto, A., Dong, Y. & Cao, M. (2015, April 6) Interkingdom Communication: Probiotics effect on healthspan in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Poster presented at the 10th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
Angeloni, J., *Conley, M., *Hourigan, P., Dong, Y. & Cao, M. (2015, April 6). Interkingdom Communication: Study of Caenorhabditis elegans and Vibrio cholerae Interactions. Poster presentation at the 10th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
Klees, M., *Nguyen, D., *Tran, S., *Gitto, A., Dong & Cao, M. (2015, April 6). Probiotics effect on healthspan in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Poster presentation at the 10th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
Graduate student, Miranda Klees, was awarded the Michael and Ellen Dobson Henson Student Assistance Endowment in Microbiology travel grant and the Clemson University Professional Enrichment Grant to support her travel to ASM Microbe 2017 and present her result at the conference.
Andrew Gitto was selected to participate in the 2016 ASM URF program. The award will provide $4000 stipend for him to conduct a minimum of 10 weeks of summer research in our lab and up to $1000 for travel to the ASM 2017 General Meeting. 
Andrew Gitto was awarded the 2016 ASM Undergraduate Research Fellowship (ASMURF) from American Society for Microbiology.
The American Society of Microbiology (ASM) awards highly competitive Undergraduate Research Fellowships each summer for projects spanning 10 weeks, giving students the experience of greater freedom and responsibility in the lab. Andrew Gitto is among the recipients for this prestigious $4,000 fellowship. The award will allow him to complete a lab research project titled "Influence of Probiotics on Fat Storage in Caenorhabditis elegans" in Cao lab, which is also a part of the CI project. In addition to his $4,000 fellowship, the award covers travel expenses to the ASM annual meeting in June and a 2-year gift membership to ASM.
Diana Nguyen was selected to participate in the 2015 ASM URF program. The award will provide $4000 stipend for her to conduct a minimum of 10 weeks of summer research in our lab and up to $1000 for travel to the ASM2016 General Meeting. Although Diana already accepted another summer research fellowship and had to decline this one, the award is a great honor.
Graduate student Miranda Klees was awarded the Visiting Scholar Award for Excellence in Scholarship for the Natural and Computational Sciences at the 14th Annual Graduate Research Symposium at the College of William & Mary, which was held on March 20-21, 2015. Miranda was one of eight graduate students chosen by CAFLS to represent Clemson University to present at the Symposium. Her research is focused on the effects of probiotics supplementation on health using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system.
FoCI Presentation 2015
FoCI Presentation 2015
College of ScienceG
1267

Decision-Making and Risk-Taking

The purpose of this Creative Inquiry team is to conduct research on the (1) effect of emotion and reward motivation on goal-directed decision-making as well as (2) how individual differences, such as personality and susceptibility to performance pressure, affect risk-taking behaviors.  Decision-making is an inescapable, prevalent phenomenon that can have significant consequences.  This research aims to understand factors and cognitive mechanisms that affect decision-making and risk-taking. Students should expect to enroll in the CI project for at least 2 semesters. 

Team Leaders
Kaileigh Byrne Psychology
Accomplishments
*Busto, S., *Byrne, K., *Phan, D. (2019, April). Social and Cognitive Engagement is Associated with Enhanced Memory Capabilities in Older Adults. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Adesegun, N., *Six, S., *Dennis, D., *Byrne, K. (2019, April). Stop the Clock Because I Can’t Stop: Time Pressure, but not Monitoring Pressure, Impairs Response Inhibition Performance. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Splendore, M. & Byrne, K.A. (2018, April 4-5). The Effect of Emotion on Effort-Based Decision-Making. Presented at the 1st Annual Clemson Student Research Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Willis, H.C., *Peters, C. & Byrne, K.A. (2018, April 2-3). The Effect of Depressive Symptoms on Risky-Decision-Making. Presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
Winner of the Best Poster by Popular Vote Award at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum. The Effect of Depressive Symptoms on Risky-Decision-Making.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
840

Insect Viruses and Physiology

Insects provide excellent opportunities to perform basic and applied biological experiments at the molecular, physiological and organismal scales. They serve as model organisms for developmental and cellular biology, and are important vectors for human and agricultural pathogens. As a result, working with insects can expose students to numerous hard and soft skills useful in a range of life-sciences fields, from medical to agricultural biology, evolutionary and ecological to developmental and immunological. In this project, students will develop and work on projects examining the evolutionary physiology of an insect virus by looking at host-specific patterns and mechanistic basis of pathology, and molecular evolution, of different members of a virus gene family. To do this, students may participate in DNA barcoding of host insects, isolation of novel gene family members, and use of recombinant viruses and transgenic Drosophila melanogaster in organismal and cell culture bioassays. Techniques commonly used include fluorescent microscopy, immunological approaches, PCR and sequencing, and more. Students are required to participate in communicating data in weekly group meetings, and then via on-campus, state, regional, and national meetings. 

Team Leaders
Matthew Turnbull Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Daniel Howard received 1st place in poster competition at annual meeting of the SC ASM
*Daniel Howard received 2nd place in the undergraduate poster competition at SCES/GES annual meeting
*Richard Melton Third place Student Poster Competition Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium Feb 2017
*Richard Melton First place Student Poster Competition Annual South Carolina Entomological Society Meeting October 2016
Grant award from SC Cotton Board to examine gut stem and mature cells from tobacco budworm caterpillar, characterizing membrane potential.
*Corker, A., *Howard, D., *Lynch, S., *Melton, R., *Parker, J., *Zhang, P. & Turnbull, M. (2018, April 2-3) Bioelectric patterns and living: Cell membrane potentials, growth, regeneration, and pathology. Presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Melton, R., *Parker, J. & Turnbull, M. (2018, March 10) Meeting your potential: Development, defense, and regeneration in the caterpillar midgut. Presented at the Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Howard, D. & Turnbull, M. (2018, March 10). Stem cells and virus infection in the caterpillar gut. Presented at the Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Corker, A., *Lynch, S. & Turnbull, M. (2018, March 10) Bioelectric patterns associated with binding and uptake of the baculovirus, Autographa californica MNPV. Presented at the Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Baker, P. & Turnbull, M. (2018, March 10) The electrotaxis potential of insect hemocytes. Presented at the Clemson Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Melton, R., *Parker, J., & Turnbull, M. (2018, April 12) Meeting your potential: Development, defense, and regeneration in the caterpillar midgut. Molecules in the Mountain Annual Conference, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC.
*Howard, D. & Turnbull, M. (2018, April 4-6). Stem cells and virus infection in the caterpillar gut. Presented at the Joint Meeting of the South Carolina Entomological Society/Georgia Entomological Societies, Helen, GA.
*Howard, D. & Turnbull, M. (2018, April 14). Stem cells and virus infection in the caterpillar gut. Annual Meeting of the South Carolina Branch of the American Society for Microbiology, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC.
*Lynch, S., *Corker, A. & Turnbull, M. (2018, April 14) Bioelectric patterns associated with binding and uptake of the baculovirus, Autographa californica MNPV. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the South Carolina Branch of the American Society for Microbiology, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC.
*Corker, A., *Lynch, S. & Turnbull, M. (2017, October 5-6) "Bioelectric Patterns Associated with Binding and Uptake of the Baculovirus, Autographa californica MNPV." Presented at the Annual Meeting of the South Carolina Entomological Society, Georgetown, SC.
*Parker, J., *Howard, D., *Melton, R. & Turnbull, M. (2017, October 5-6) "The Guts of the Matter: Development, Defense, and Regeneration in the Caterpillar Midgut". Presented at the Annual Meeting of the South Carolina Entomological Society, Georgetown SC.
*Corker, A., *Hinsch, V., *Howard, D., *Howard, Y., *Melton, R., *Nietering, J., *Parker, J., *Reilly, M., *Stuart, G. (2017, April). Caterpillar Viruses And Insects In Biotechnology. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Melton, R. (2017, Feb). "Effects of gap junction inhibition on Heliothis virescens gut development". CBASS Annual Meeting, Watt Family Innovation Center.
Zhang, P., *Erickson, S.L., and Turnbull, M.W. (2016, October 28). Functional analysis of potential insect virus virulence factors. South Carolina Entomological Society Annual Meeting. Hickory Knob State Park, SC.
*Melton, R. and Turnbull, M.W. (2016, October 28). Significance of gut gap junction activity in caterpillar life history. South Carolina Entomological Society Meeting. Hickory Knob State Park, SC.
*Erickson, S.L. (2016, March). Use of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster to test function of insect virus genes. CBASS Annual meeting.
Sf9 cells stained with the membrane potential sensitive dye, DiBac4(3). from work by Alexa Corker.
Primary gut cells from the caterpillar, Heliothis virescens. By Jessie Parker.
Tobacco budworm (Heliothis virescens) gut tissue, stained with TRITC-phalloidin (F-actin cytoskeleton, red) and DAPI (nuclei, blue). From Jessie Parker and Richard Melton work.
Hasegawa, D. K., *Erickson, S. L., Hersh, B. M., & Turnbull, M. W. (2017). Virus Innexins induce alterations in insect cell and tissue function. Journal of Insect Physiology, 98, 173–181. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jinsphys.2017.01.003
College of ScienceG
1442

Building Elder Care Services

Students work with the professor to assess caregivers attitudes, knowledge and benefits about the care of persons with cognitive impairment.  The students will do community based action research and consider policy changes that could improve the health of elders and those who care for them.

Team Leaders
Kathleen Valentine School of Nursing
Diane Hannon School of Nursing
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
862

The use of medical-grade compression clothing in children with Autism

On this team, students will explore the effect of medical-grade compression vests on the behavioral responses of children with autism.  The use of compression clothing, widely employed in sensory integration therapy and marketed to parents of children with autism, is not supported (nor refuted) as a viable therapy option in any known published manuscripts.  In this study, the effectiveness of this therapy technique will be scientifically established.  Student researchers will video record the children with and without compression vests.  The video data will later be reviewed to determine the vests’ effectiveness. 

Team Leaders
Jennifer Bisson Psychology
Accomplishments
*Miller, L., *Starr, M., Bisson, J. (2019, April). Talk the talk: A content analysis on language use in academic sources related to ASD. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Bennett, K., *Simpson, S., Bisson, J. (2017, April). The Effect of Compression on Stereotyped Behaviors in Children with Autism. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
MCDavid, B. Clemson students research possible benefits of compression clothing for children with autism. [Video file]. (2017, March 8). WYFF 4. Retrieved from http://www.wyff4.com/article/clemson-students-research-possible-benefits-of-compression-clothing-for...Clemson students research possible benefits of compression clothing for children with autism
The effect of compression in children with autism. [Video file]. (2017, March 3). Fox Carolina 21. Retrieved from http://www.foxcarolina.com/video?autoStart=true&topVideoCatNo=default&clipId=13149160
Staton, M. (2017, February 22). Researchers examine effects of compression clothing on children with autism. Retrieved from http://newsstand.clemson.edu/mediarelations/researchers-examine-effects-of-compression-clothing-on-c...
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
965

Montana Prairie Ecology

This Creative Inquiry is part of an undergraduate summer program that exposes Clemson students to the biodiversity and working landscape of the Great Plains through directed research experiences.  Students will spend the spring semester learning about the ecosystem, developing research questions and preparing for the summer when they will travel to Montana.  In the fall, the project will focus on analyzing resulting data.  More information on the project and how to apply can be found at:  http://prairieecology.blogspot.com/ 

Team Leaders
David Jachowski Forestry & Environment Conserv
Keifer Titus Forestry & Environment Conserv
Accomplishments
*Ferral, M., *Mcdaniel, E., *Murray, J., *Slater, F., *Taylor, G., Titus, K., Lascano, G., Jachowski, D. (2019, April). Effects of Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa) Thinning on Forage Quality and Quality in the Northern Great Plains of Montana. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Photobook of summer program. 
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
883

Single Molecule Biophysics

In this project, students get the opportunity to explore and learn about single molecule biophysics. What it takes to do studies at the single molecular level, the methodologies need to prepare the samples, at the interface of all basic sciences. Students select among various molecular systems that we currently work with in the lab, and learn how to prepare the samples, how to measure them and how to interpret the results.

Team Leaders
Hugo Sanabria Physics and Astronomy
Accomplishments
NSF CAREER award.
*Spencer M, Levesque B., Wang B., Ding F., Bowen M., Sanabria H., (2016, April). Using FRET to determine structural dynamics and inter-domain interactions of tandems PDZ1-2 domains in PSD95. Syracuse, N.Y.
*Kouser, H, Blocker R.E., *Spencer M., *Disharoon Z., Yanez-Orozco I.S., Sanabria H. (2016, April). Recombinant Flavodoxin for Single Molecule Fluorescence Experiments, Clemson, SC.
*Tremblay, L., *Williams, F., *Disharoon, Z., *Andorfer, R., Yanez-Orozco I.S.A., Sanabria, H. (2014, November 7-8). Single Molecule Spectroscopy Using Multiparameter Fluorescence Detection. Poster presented at the Sigma Xi Student Research Conference, Glendale, AZ.
College of ScienceG
886

Nano 3D printing using bacteria

Imagine using bacteria as tiny 3D printers to weave a material from the bottom-up. We know that many bacteria can synthesize useful materials. In this project we use 1) a bacteria that transforms sugar in its environment to high purity cellulose nanofibers with excellent mechanical properties, and 2) electric fields  to manipulate the bacteria in time and space. The project focuses on the study of the effects of electric field on the synthesis of bacterial cellulose, and the development of optoelectronic tweezers to manipulate single bacterial cells in designed trajectories. Go to www.multiscalemanufacturing.net to see videos

Team Leaders
Rodrigo Martinez-Duarte Mechanical Engineering
Devin Keck Mechanical Engineering
Accomplishments
*Flach, J.P., *Figuereido de Lima, P., *Sparks, J., Islam, M. & Martinez-Duarte, R. (2016, April 6-7). Synthesis of Titanium Oxycarbide Through Carbothermal Reduction of Titanium Oxide Nanoparticles and Renewable Biopolymers. Presented at the 11th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
Flach, J.P., *Figuereido de Lima, P., *Sparks, J., Islam, M., Martinez-Duarte, R. (2016, May). “Synthesis of Titanium Oxycarbide through carbothermal reduction of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and renewable polymers”. ECS Engineering Carbon Hybrids Symposium, San Diego, CA.
Flach, J., *Figuereido de Lima, P., *Sparks, J., Islam, M., Martinez-Duarte, R. (2016). “Synthesis of Titanium Oxycarbide through carbothermal reduction of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and renewable polymers”.  ECS Transactions, 72(1), 17-23.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1602

The Nanomaterials Studio: Modeling Materials at the Nanoscale

Nanomaterials are a class of materials with a feature size (e.g., crystal size, a dimension of an object) in the nano-metric (10^-9 m) regime. Many new phenomena and properties emerge in nanomaterials that enable a wide range of real-life applications, including miniaturized electronics, light-weight structures, and energy harvesting and conversion devices. In this CI project, students will perform research activities related to the field metallurgy and gain hands-on experience in performing simulations that explore the thermal and mechanical behavior of a wide range of nano-structured metals. The goal of such studies is to explore size effects in novel metallic systems and identify features at the nanoscale that optimize their properties. The research work is computational in nature and employs a wide range of simulation tools.

Team Leaders
Fadi Abdeljawad Mechanical Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1600

In vitro fertilization and embryo culture

Successful reproduction of livestock is critical for the economic livelihood of farmers and affects the consumer cost of meat and other animal products [1]. In vitro-production of embryos is one of many assisted reproductive technologies having a positive impact on bovine production systems. This technique has several advantages over the recovery of in vivo-derived embryos, but in vitro maturation (IVM), in vitro fertilization (IVF) and in vitro culture (IVC) procedures need further improvement. In the bovine system, in vitro production of blastocyst (the embryonic developmental stage that is commonly transferred into a recipient cow to obtain a pregnancy) has plateaued at around 40 %; however, the in vivo embryonic development rate is in the range of 85 to 95%. Among the many steps for in vitro embryo production, oocyte cytoplasmic maturation is a critical factor determining the success of subsequent embryo development (oocyte is the ovum or “egg”) [2]. In this project, we propose to use light stimulation to enhance oocyte cytoplasmic maturation. Based on reports in other cells and tissues, the light wavelength, time, and frequency of exposure may have different effects on cells, ranging from null, to stimulating, to detrimental. We will test different light protocols during oocyte maturation, and measure the subsequent changes in blastocyst production. A significant increase in blastocyst production will make the in vitro production system more efficient, reducing costs for bovine producers and their customers. In the process, we will also increase our understanding of the basic physiology of the oocyte, the maturation process, and the effects of photostimulation in general.[1] USDA/NIFA. Animal Reproduction Overview. In: Animals & Animal Products, vol. 2014. Washington, DC: National Institute of Food and Agriculture; 2012.[2] Data reviewed in the overview of W3171: Germ Cell and Embryo Development and Manipulation for the Improvement of Livestock

Team Leaders
Celina Checura Animal & Veterinary Sciences
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1077

Prosthetics - Socket Fit Sensor

We have developed a sensor which will allow users and medical personnel to score a socket based on how well it fits a user.  We are currently working on an evaluation apparatus, which will allow us to test the sensor in a relevant way. 

Team Leaders
Christopher W. Norfolk Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
951

Assessing Reasoning

We are studying a number of aspects of reasoning and attention, including: 1. fault diagnosis (finding what caused a particular event to happen); 2. making decisions about your health; and 3. attention allocation during driving (how can drivers make wise decisions about where to attend to next?, eg, should i take that cell phone call?)

Team Leaders
Leo J Gugerty Psychology
Nathan Dumessa
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1018

Video game development for fun learning of distributed dynamical systems

This project aims at the development of a car racing video game which can enhance the student learning experience of distributed dynamical  systems and intelligent transportation. The project will be built upon existing work which already realized a sophisticated vehicle simulator, a  game framework, and graphics engine. Students will be focused on developing an interface between existing work and intelligent transportation systems. The game development itself will be a fun learning process. Knowledge of Linux and C++/C is required. No knowledge of distributed dynamical systems is needed.

Team Leaders
Yongqiang Wang Electrical & Computer Engr
Accomplishments
I am attaching a screen shot of the "1018 video game" CIproject results. Currently we already achieved autonomous platooningof autonomous "Clemson-Pride" vehicles. We are working to extend thisto  multiple-lane convoys.
IEEE CSS outreach fund, $10,000
IEEE Control Systems Society outreach fund, 10K.
Wang, Y., *Maxwell, T., *Bear, E., & Anglea, T. (2016). A unified communication and control approach for decentralized heading alignment in robot networks. In 2016 Chinese Control and Decision Conference (CCDC). IEEE. https://doi.org/10.1109/ccdc.2016.7531413
*Maxwell, T., *Bear, E., *Raval, D., Anglea, T., Wang, Y.Q. (2016).  An undergraduate research platformfor cooperative control and swarm robotics.  In 2016 IEEE 11th Conference on Industrial Electronics and Applications (ICIEA). IEEE. https://doi.org/10.1109/iciea.2016.7603893
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1022

Engineering Yeast for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Nutraceuticals

This project is about converting low value feedstocks into higher valued product by engineering the metabolism of cells. We work with different types of yeast that are good at making fats – and we engineer them to make a variety products important for the chemical industry, fine chemical, natural products and pharmaceuticals, and enzymes. We use genetic engineering, synthetic biology, and CRISPR-Cas9 to engineer cells.

Team Leaders
Mark Blenner Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Michael Spagnuolo
Stephen Lee
Vijaydev Ganesan
Accomplishments
*Burnette, W., *Franaszek, N., *Bailey, M., Ganesen, V., Yaguchi, A., Spagnuolo, M. & Blenner, M. (2019, April). Engineering Yeast for Sustainable Production. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Bailey, M., Spagnuolo, M. & Blenner, M. (2018, April 7). Engineering Plasmid Performance in Yarrowia lipolytica. Poster presented at the Annual SC EPSCoR/IDEA Meeting, Columbia, SC.
Rodriguez, G., *Gambill, L., Shabbir-Hussain, M., & Blenner, M. (2017, January). "Engineering Robust Xylose Utilization in Yarrowia Lipolytica Using Cryptic Metabolic Pathways." Presented at the International Conference on Biomolecular Engineering, San Diego, CA.
Shabbir-Hussain, M., Wiseman, W., & Blenner, M. (2017, January). "Development of Fine-Tuned and Responsive Genetic Engineering Tools for Yarrowia Lipolytica." Poster presented at the International Conference on Biomolecular Engineering, San Diego, CA.
Spagnuolo, M., Gao, D., & Blenner, M. (2016, November). "PHA Production Using Yarrowia Lipolytica and Alternative Feedstocks." Presented at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA.
Shabbir Hussain, M., *Baker, P., Wheeldon, I., Blenner, M. (2016, November). "Genomic Hot Spots for Strong and Stable Expression Sites in Yarrowia Lipolytica." Presented at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA.
Shabbir Hussain, M., *Baker, P., Blenner, M. (2016, November). "Engineering Fatty Acid Responsive Elements for Metabolic Engineering in the Oleaginous Yeast, Yarrowia Lipolytica." Presented at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA.
Shabbir Hussain, M., Blenner, M. (2016, November). "Development of Hybrid Lipid Sensors for Metabolic Engineering in the Oleaginous Yeast, Yarrowia Lipolytica." Presented at the Southeast Regional American Society of Microbiology Meeting, Florence, AL
Rodriguez, G., Shabbir-Hussain, M., *Gambill, L., Blenner, M. (2016, November). "Enabling Xylose Metabolism in Oleaginous Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica." Presented at the Southeast Regional American Society of Microbiology Meeting, Florence, AL.
Blenner, M. (2016, November). "Critical Challenges for Synthetic Biology Applications in Space Life Support Systems." Invited presentation at NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA.
Blenner, M. (2016, November). "Synthetic Biology: From Benchtop to Mars." Invited presentation to the Microbiology Club, Clemson, SC.
*Gambill, L., Rodriguez, G., Blenner, M. (2016, October). "Improving xylose utilization in engineered strains of Yarrowia lipolytica." Poster presented at the Southeastern Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Columbia, SC.
*Brabender, M., Rodriguez, G., Blenner, M. (2016, October). "Urine as an alternative nitrogen source for growing Yarrowia lipolytica." Poster presented at the Southeastern Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Columbia, SC.
*Smith, S., Shabbir Hussain, M., Blenner, M. (2016, October). "Understanding the rules of responsive hybrid promoters." Poster presented at the Southeastern Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Columbia, SC.
Gao, D., Spagnuolo, M., Rodriguez, G., *Brabender, M., *Scola, K., & Blenner, M. (2017, April). "Synthetic Biology for Recycling Human Waste into Nutraceuticals and Materials." Presented at the American Chemical Society Meeting, San Francisco, CA.
*Smith, S. & Blenner, M., (2017, April). "Developing a genetic tool for metabolic engineering in Yarrowia lipolytica." Invited presentation at the ACC Meeting of the Minds, Durham, NC.
Blenner, M. (2017, April). "Expanding Capabilities for Engineering Yeast for Biochemical Production." Invited Departmental Seminar Presented at Chemical Engineering Departmental Seminar, Columbia University, New York, NY.
Shabbir Hussain, M., Schwartz, C., Wheeldon, I., & Blenner, M. (2017, May). "Discovery of a fatty acid response element in Yarrowia lipolytica and its use to construct finely tuned fatty acid responsive promoters to enable strain engineering and dynamic regulation." Presented at the Symposium for Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals Meeting, San Francisco, CA.
Yaguchi, A., *Robinson, A., & Blenner, M. (2017, May). "Aromatic metabolism by oleaginous yeast." Poster presented at the Symposium for Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals Meeting, San Francisco, CA.
Blenner, M. (2017, May). "Engineering oleaginous yeast for biochemical production using non-conventional feedstocks." Invited Industry Seminar to REG, San Francisco, CA.
Blenner, M. (2017, May). "Expanding Capabilities for Engineering Yeast for Biochemical Production." Invited Departmental Seminar Presented at Chemical & Materials Engineering, University of California – Irvine, Irvine, CA.
*Baker, P., *Brabender, M., *Gambill, L., *Hardy, W., *Scola, K., *Smith, S., Blenner, M. (April 2016). Engineering Yeast for Production of Oleochemicals from Waste and Renewable Resources. Poster presented at the FoCI Conference, Clemson, SC.
Rodriguez, G., Shabbir-Hussain, M., *Gambill, L., Blenner, M. (August 2015). Elucidating the Role of Xylose Metabolism Enzymes in the Oleaginous Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. Presentation given at the Society of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology Annual Meeting, Philadelphia PA
Shabbir-Hussain, M. *Gambill, L., Rodriguez, G., Blenner, M. (November 2015). Exploring Mechanisms for Xylose Transport in Oleaginous Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. Presentation given at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting, Salt Lake City, UT
Rodriguez, G, Shabbir-Hussain, M., *Gambill, L., Blenner, M. (November 2015). Elucidating the Role of Xylose Metabolism Enzymes in the Oleaginous Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. Presentation given at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting, Salt Lake City, UT
Schartz, C. Shabbir-Hussain, M., Blenner, M., Wheeldon, I. (November 2015). Genome Editing in Yarrowia Lipolytica Using a Crispr-Cas9 System with RNA Polymerase II Transcribed Single Guide RNA. Presentation given at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting, Salt Lake City, UT
Blenner, M. (November 2015). Yarrowia lipolytica as a robust platform for biochemical production from complex substrates. Invited Departmental Seminar, Ohio University
Shabbir-Hussain, M. *Baker, P., Blenner, M. (2016, March) Engineering Fatty Acid Responsive Elements for Metabolic Engineering of Oleaginous Yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica. Poster given at the American Chemical Society Meeting, San Diego, CA
Rodriguez, G., Shabbir-Hussain, M., *Gambill, L., Blenner, M. (March 2016). Engineering Xylose Metabolism Through Unveiling Cryptic Enzymes and Transporter Expression in Yarrowia lipolytica. Presentation given at the American Chemical Society Meeting, San Diego, CA
*Gambill, L., Shabbir-Hussain, M., Rodriguez, G., Blenner, M. (April 2016). Identification of a xylose transport and interconversion pathway in the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. Presentation given at the ACC Research Conference, Syracuse, NY.
Rodriguez, G., Shabbir-Hussain, M., *Gambill, L., Blenner, M (2016, April). Enabling Xylose Metabolism from a Cryptic Pathway in Yarrowia lipolytica. Presentation given at the Symposium for Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals Meeting, Baltimore, MD.
Shabbir-Hussain, M., *Baker, P., and Blenner, M. (2016, July) Genomic Hot Spots for Strong and Stable Expression Sites in Yarrowia lipolytica. Poster presented at Society of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology Meeting, New Orleans, LA.
2018 SC EPSCoR/IDEA Meeting, April 7. Columbia, SC
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program
*Lauren Gambill, 2016 Biomolecular Engineering REU – Best Poster
*Kaitlyn Scola, Fulbright Fellowship Semifinalist
*Lauren Gambill - 2017 CU College of Science Outstanding Undergraduate Research Award
*Lauren Gambill - NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program – Awardee
NASA Center Internship - *Matt Brabender
NASA SC Space Grant Undergraduate Research Fellowship - *Matt Brabender
ACCIAC Creativity & Innovation Fellowship (*S. Smith, 2016)
ACCIAC Creativity & Innovation Fellowship (*L. Gambill, 2015)
ChBE Graduate Researcher of the Year (M. Shabbir Hussain, 2017)
“CRISPR-Enabled Genome-Wide Screening of the Oleaginous Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica” DOE Joint Genome Institute: Community Science Program in Synthetic Biology, Principal Investigator, 1.5 Mb DNA Synthesis ($0 real; ~$200,000 value) (2016-2018) DOE-DE-AC02-05CH11231
“Collaborative Research: Controlling Cellular Physiology and Enzyme Localization for Enhanced Oleochemical Biosynthesis in Yeast”, NSF CBET Cellular & Biochemical Engineering, Principal Investigator, $347,277 ($347,277), (2017-2020).
“Understanding the Influence of Kinetics and Structure in CRISPR-Cas9 Cutting of Non-Conventional Yeast” SC EPSCoR/IDeA, Principal Investigator $10,000 ($10,000), (2017).
“Optimization and Initial Bioprocess Scale Up of Omega-3 Production from Rendered Fat”, Animal Coproducts Research & Education Center, Principal Investigator, $38,500 ($38,500), (2016-2017).
“Palmetto Academy: Synthetic Biology Enabled Recycling of Waste for Life Support”, SC Space Grant Consortium, Principal Investigator, $36,000 ($36,000), (2016).
“Synthetic Biology for Recycling Human Waste into Nutraceuticals, and Materials: Closing the Loop for Long-Term Space Travel”, NASA Early Career Faculty Award, Principal Investigator, $599,785 ($599,785), (2015-2018).
“Intracellular Localization of Biosynthetic Pathways for Conversion of Lipids to Dicarboxylic Acids in Oleaginous Yeast Yarrowia Lipolytica”, NSF CBET Biotechnology, Biochemical, & Biomass Engineering, Principal Investigator, $301,127 ($301,127), (2014-2017). Award CBET:1403099
Yaguchi, A., *Robinson, A., *Mihealsick, E., & Blenner, M. (2017). Metabolism of aromatic compounds by Trichosporon oleaginosus while remaining oleaginous.  Microbial Cell Factories. 16:206. DOI 10.1186/s12934-017-0820-8
Hussain, M. S., Wheeldon, I., & Blenner, M. (2017). A strong hybrid fatty acid inducible transcriptional sensor built from Yarrowia lipolytica upstream activating and regulatory sequences. Biotechnology Journal, 12: 1700248. DOI: 10.1002/biot.201700248
Rodriguez, G. M., Hussain, M. S., *Gambill, L., Gao, D., Yaguchi, A., & Blenner, M. (2016). Engineering xylose utilization in Yarrowia lipolytica by understanding its cryptic xylose pathway. Biotechnology for Biofuels, 9(1). doi:10.1186/s13068-016-0562-6
Schwartz, C., Shabbir-Hussain, M., Frogue, K., Blenner, M., & Wheeldon, I. (2016). Standardized Markerless Gene Integration for Pathway Engineering in Yarrowia lipolytica. ACS Synthetic Biology, 6(3), 402-409. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.6b00285
Yaguchi, A., Rives, D., & Blenner, M. (2017). New kids on the block: Emerging oleaginous yeast of biotechnological importance. AIMS Microbiology, 3(2), 227-247. doi:10.3934/microbiol.2017.2.227
Shabbir Hussain, M., M Rodriguez, G., Gao, D., Spagnuolo, M., Gambill, L., & Blenner, M. (2016). Recent advances in bioengineering of the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. AIMS Bioengineering, 3(4), 493-514. http://dx.doi.org/10.3934/bioeng.2016.4.493
Shabbir Hussain, M., *Gambill L., *Smith, S., Blenner, M. (2016) Engineering Promoter Architecture in Oleaginous Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. ACS Synthetic Biology, 5(3):213-223.
Schwartz, C. M., Hussain, M. S., Blenner, M., & Wheeldon, I. (2016). Synthetic RNA Polymerase III Promoters Facilitate High-Efficiency CRISPR–Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing in Yarrowia lipolytica. ACS Synthetic Biology, 5(4), 356–359. https://doi.org/10.1021/acssynbio.5b00162
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1642

Putting the Arts in STEM: STEAM Learning through Organ Building

This CI group will explore elementary uses of the Orgelkid (http://orgelkidsusa.org/ ). Also they will expand to other audiences, such as college mechanical engineering programs and general communities at large via guerrilla outreach, i.e. simply laying Orgelkids out in a public setting and observe/record what happens. Traditional means of measuring and documenting outcomes for any final deliverable will need to be implemented. A grant proposal will be prepared for Program Title: 2021 NSF Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL).

Team Leaders
Linda Dzuris Performing Arts
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
1341

Targeted gene editing in mammalian cells

Gene therapy has been proposed for inherited and acquired diseases yielding promising results in animal studies and human clinical trials. The advent of gene-editing tools, such as CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases have unleashed new possibilities for curing diseases at the genetic level. In this creative inquiry, we will investigate the application of genome editing tools for achieving precise gene modification in target cells for therapeutic applications.

Team Leaders
Renee Cottle Bioengineering
Lawrence Fernando Bioengineering
Accomplishments
*Addlestone, E., *Nadolski, G., *Salvadore, K., *Fernando, L., *Cottle, R. (2019, April). Optimization of Gene Editing Tools for Precise Gene Editing. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1637

Dirty Pledges: Metapopulations, Microbiomes and the Secret Lives of Clemson Fraternity Cockroaches

How many cockroaches are there in a fraternity? And does this number vary from one fraternity to another? Do cockroaches born in one fraternity ever venture to another? Or do they spend their whole lives in a single location? And if there is movement of insects, how far do they go? Although we know a lot about cockroach life history, we don't know too much about their patterns of spatial use. What we do know - for instance the fact that they must go outside to breed - suggests that cockroaches may form metapopulations when distributed across buildings. That is, most insects spend the vast majority of their time in one building; however, there is occasional movement between the otherwise largely separate populations. If this is true, then cockroaches make an easily accessible (albeit a little gross) system for studying metapopulation models. Metapopulation dynamics have long been studied in other species, including other insects. However, what hasn't been studied is the effect that metapopulation dynamics have on host microbiomes. For this Creative Inquiry, we will first examine cockroach spatial dynamics. We will then examine cockroach microbiomes to determine whether these can be differentiated based on the fraternity/building from which a cockroach is collected. Beyond providing valuable insight into cockroach movement and the bacteria that they carry from house to house, this work will also help to define fundamental relationships between host spatial population dynamics and host microbiomes.

Team Leaders
Sharon Bewick Biological Sciences
College of ScienceG
1044

Japanese stiltgrass invasion in a multi-use forest: patterns, mechanisms and perceptions

Introduction to invasion ecology research, with emphasis on Japanese stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum) invasion in “multiple-use” forest landscapes. The Clemson Experimental Forest (CEF) will be used for field sites for a project that assesses if recreational trails and trailheads facilitate Japanese stiltgrass invasion.

Team Leaders
Donald Hagan Forestry & Environment Conserv
Accomplishments
*Rehfus, A., *Bock, N., *Durham, P., *Sayers, S., *Stamey, T. (2016, April 18-22). Identifying plant invasion hotspots to prioritize restoration efforts in a multiple-use forest. National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration.
*Bock, N., *Durham, P., *Rehfus, A., *Sayers, S., *Stamey, T. (2016, April). Do roads and trails facilitate plant invasions in multiple-use forests. Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, SC.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1429

Chemotaxis "Black Hole" Hydrogel for Tumor Elimination

Complete tumor elimination is essential in preventing recurrent tumors from appearing. Hydrogels are a cutting-edge, attractive option for cancer drug delivery. In most cases, hydrogels will release encapsulated anti-cancer drugs into the surrounding tumor tissue. We are interested in exploring a “black hole” hydrogel. In this case, the hydrogel would use motogenic signals, signals that cause cells to migrate, to “draw in” cancerous cells through a process called chemotaxis. Tumor cells that enter the hydrogel could then be eliminated using an embedded anti-cancer drug. We hypothesize that this treatment can work in conjunction with, or replace, traditional anti-cancer treatments like chemo- and radiotherapy for elimination of cancerous tumors. Success would not only improve patient survival rates, but potentially greatly increase patient quality of life. We are looking for a motivated group of individuals willing to work closely with our graduate students and faculty to explore innovative new oncological treatment options. Students will learn about polymer and biology fundamentals including polymeric drug delivery and cancer cell biology. They will have hands-on experience with mammalian cell culture and making hydrogels.

Team Leaders
Marc Birtwistle Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Jessica Larsen Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1053

Drinking Water Quality

Students work to evaluate drinking water quality in the state of South Carolina. They test private wells, municipal water systems, and ambient source water for contaminants like E-coli and nitrate. They also measure general water quality parameters like pH, conductivity, hardness, alkalinity, and temperature.

Team Leaders
David Ladner Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
Accomplishments
Ladner, D.A., Song, L., Griffis, H.M., Landa, E.R. & Tasian, G.E. (2017, June) "Correlating Drinking Water Quality with Kidney Stone Incidence in South Carolina." Platform presentation at the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors (AEESP) by-annual meeting, Ann Arbor, MI.
Ladner, D.A., Holtmann, K., Al-Dulaimi, R.*, Bui, K.*, Degen, J.*, Dove, M.*, Gallimore, N.*, Knapp, M.*, Markley, A.*, Mettlen, H., Shugart, R.*, and Vatalaro, A*. (2016, October). "Mapping South Carolina drinking water quality for alignment with health-record databases in epidemiological studies." Platform presentation at the South Carolina Water Resources Conference, Columbia, SC.
*Holtman, K., *Mettlen, H., *Knapp, M., Ladner, D.A. (2016, March). "Correlating water quality and kidney stone incidence in South Carolina." Poster presentation at the South Carolina Environmental Conference, Myrtle Beach, SC.
Holtman, K.*; Mettlen, H.*; Markley, A.*; Knappe, M.; Al-Dulaimi, R.*; Shugart, R.*; Ladner, D.A. (2016, March 14). Correlating Water Quality and Kidney Stone Incidence in South Carolina. Poster presented at the annual South Carolina Environmental Conference, Myrtle Beach, SC.
In this year we developed a relationship and collaboration with the water quality engineers at the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. They provided water quality data for 63 surface water systems in the state of South Carolina.
Our collaborators are Gregory Tasian, a urologist at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and Edward Landa, an environmental scientist at the University of Maryland. They have been working with us to compile and analyze water quality and kidney stone occurrence data.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1068

Meiotic Homologous Recombination

Our laboratory studies the mechanism behind the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination during meiosis.  We use both human and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study meiotic recombination. The introduction of DNA double-strand breaks during meiosis is carefully controlled.  If not repaired, a DSB can result in genome instability and potentially, cancer. DSBs are caused by exposure to chemicals, radiation, oxidative reactive species generated during normal metabolism and damaged replication forks. The repair of DSBs often involves the homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathway. The heart of HR is the RAD51 and DMC1 recombinase. These enzymes catalyze the search for homology between the damaged DNA and the sister chromatid. The activity of the recombinases is modulated by a number of accessory proteins. We utilize a combination of molecular biological and biochemical techniques to determine the role these accessory proteins have in the modulation of RAD51 and DMC1 recombinase activity. The results of our studies will provide insight into the mechanistic underpinnings of HR and genome maintenance.

Team Leaders
Michael Sehorn Genetics and Biochemistry
College of ScienceG
1597

Application of Machine Learning to Science and Engineering

In this project, students will learn and work on applying machine learning methods to science and engineering problems, including 1) understanding the factors in composite materials manufacture to enable industry 4.0, 2) Discovery of Twin-Phase Composite Oxides for Practical Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production, 3) Predicting methylation states in plants using Nanopore sequencing data.

Team Leaders
Feng Luo School of Computing
Jianhua Tong Materials Science&Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1072

Coupling Green Roofs, Rainwater Cisterns, and Urban Agriculture

This project is exploring the possible synergy between utilizing green roofs, rainwater cisterns, and roof top agriculture. Green roofs have many benefits, but their impact on reducing stormwater runoff quantity from larger design storms is limited. Including a cistern can be a way to improve this, a cistern by itself is not a reasonable approach if there is no use for the stored water. Urban agriculture is the link that we will use to couple these two BMPs as the stored water can be used to irrigate the plants in the green roof, which expands the types of plants which can be grown to crops which can be harvested and produce a source of revenue as well as a source of locally produced food.

Team Leaders
William Martin General Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1073

Using an Arduino for Tech Development

This project is teaching students to use Arduinos to allow students to develop their own prototypes. An Arduino microcontroller is an easy to learn interface between electrical hardware and programing. After students have learned the basic concepts, they will be allowed to brainstorm and create a device of their choosing and design which utilizes an Arduino to solve a problem.

Team Leaders
William Martin General Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1080

Diagnostic imaging in animal research

Formal laboratory, library, or field study of problems related to diagnostic imaging research in animals, emphasizing hypothesis development, testing, and reporting results. 

Team Leaders
Jeryl Jones Animal & Veterinary Sciences
Jeremy Mercuri Bioengineering
Accomplishments
Carolyn Hynes presenting her poster at ACVR Meeting in Phoenix, AZ. October, 2017.
Sara Beeland presenting her poster at the International Working Dog Conference in Banff, Canada. April, 2017
Sanders, Samantha. (2016, October 21). Comparison of canine lumbosacral angle measurement techniques for standardized flexion and extension positions using computed tomography. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Veterinary Radiology, Orlando, FL.
Students in the Creative Inquiry helped to host a visit by Dr. Jean Meade, DVM, PhD, MD, Dipl. Occupational Medicine during Fall 2015.  Dr. Meade is an internationally recognized scholar in the field of occupational toxicology, owner of Cheat Lake Animal Hospital, co-founder of the Hearts of Gold foundation, and founder of the service dog training program at West Virginia University.  Dr. Meade presented a seminar for the AVS Seminar Series and met with  students to discuss their research and career plans.
Beeland S, Carnevale M, Jones J. 2017, April 3. Sacroiliac joint lesions in species other than humans and dogs: literature review. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the International Working Dog Breeder Association, Banff, Alberta, Canada.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1168

Fish Biodiversity Challenge

This Creative Inquiry project focuses on conservation science of South Carolina's native fishes. Students learn sampling and lab techniques, as well as data management and analysis. Students have the opportunity to develop independent research projects and present findings at professional conferences, as well as author scientific publications.

Team Leaders
Brandon Peoples Forestry & Environment Conserv
Colby Denison Forestry & Environment Conserv
Lauren Stoczynski Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Lamb, E., Bell, D. & Peoples, B. (2018 April 2-3) Evaluating Length Bias in Three-Pass Depletion Backpack Electrofishing. Poster presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Lamb, E., Bell, D. & Peoples, B. (2018 March) Evaluating Length Bias in Three-Pass Depletion Backpack Electrofishing. Poster presented at the SC Chapter of American Fisheries Society, Beaufort, SC
*Lamb, E., Bell, D. & Peoples, B. (2018 March) Evaluating Length Bias in Three-Pass Depletion Backpack Electrofishing. Poster presented at the Southern Division of American Fisheries Society, San Juan, Puerto Rico.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1083

Biomimicry and Biomimetics

Biomimicry is an approach to innovation that seeks sustainable solutions to human challenges by emulating nature's time-tested patterns and strategies. Biomimicry and Biomimetics aims to create products, processes, and policies—new ways of living—that are well-adapted to life on earth over the long haul using nature as a model. This project proposes to observe and investigate the diverse ecosystem of the greater Clemson area watershed.

Team Leaders
Carlos Barrios School of Architecture
Accomplishments
*Staudmyer, C., *Fair, T., *Deyoung, C., *Debeljak, W., *Busher, J., *Aldridge, W., Barrios, C. (2019, April). 1083 Biomimicry and Biomimetics. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Barrios, C., *Gaskins, J., *Hafner, N., *Faykus, M., *Busher, J., *Curry, T., *Frager, J., *Horne, J. (2017, January). Distribution of Curbicula Flumiea in Clemson area lakes. Poster presentation at Biology research poster session, Clemson, SC.
Barrios, C., *Gaskins, J., *Hafner, N., *Faykus, M., *Busher, J., *Curry, T., *Frager, J., *Horne, J. (2017, April). Shell organisms from Clemson area lakes. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Alderson, E., *Curry, T., *Faykus, M., *Gaskins, J., *Grubb, S., *Hafner, N., *Kittrell, B., *Lindler, M., *Loe, N., *Miyasato, E., *Rabin, J., *Rolfe, S., *Tharp, K., Barrios, C. (2016, April). Biomimicry. Poster presentation at Clemson University 11th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
1094

Tiger Gardens: healthy home gardens to combat malnutrition and obesity in SC, USA

Research suggests that failure to link agricultural production with human nutrition and health has led to the development of unhealthy food systems. Malnutrition and high calorie linked chronic diseases are the result of unhealthy food systems. A sensible and quick approach to combat nutritional challenges would be to increase dietary diversity through vegetables that can provide a range of essential nutrients.  This proposed Creative Inquiry project provides an introduction to vegetable production, value addition, and nutrition.  Students are expected to develop a home garden model to provide year-round nutritious vegetables (especially micronutrients and vegetable proteins) to a small family. 

Team Leaders
Dil Thavarajah Plant & Environmental Sciences
Accomplishments
*Mcswain, M., *Cox, B. & Thavarajah, D. (2017 Oct 11) Tiger Garden – approach to prevent local hidden hunger. Presented at the CU Global Food Security Institute, Clemson, SC.
Thavarajah, D. (2017 July 24) Future Ag Ambassadors for Global Food Security: Biofortification. Presented at the Commissioner School Program, Clemson, SC.
Thavarajah, D. (2017 Oct 11) Pulse crops towards food security. Presented at the Annual meeting of the CU Global Food Security Institute, Clemson, SC.
Thavarajah, D. (2018 Feb 8) Invited Lecture, Food systems linking to the world health challenges – biotechnology challenges in global food production Presented to the AgEd 4160 - Ethics and Issues in agriculture and the Food and Fiber system, Clemson, SC.
Thavarajah, Dil (2018 April 7) Invited Seminar, Pulse crops linking to global food security and human health. Presented at the International Association of students in Agricultural and related Sciences (IAAS) National Summit 2018, SC.
Thavarajah, D. (2017 June 20-23) Pulses as Whole Food Solution to Global Health Challenges. Presented at the  Annual meeting at the American Council for Medicinally Active Plant, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
Thavarajah, D. (2018). Pulses Linking to Global Food Security and Human health. Presented at the Annual International Food Legume Research Conference, Morocco.
*McSwain, M., *Nicolas, B., *Dale, S., *Sterling, A., *Schueren, F., *Younts, G., Behnke, M. F., *Edwards, R.M., *Gallagher, S.R., Mapapathirannehelage, I.P., Siva, N. & Thavarajah Dil. (2018 April 2-3). Tiger Gardens: Healthy urban vegetable production. Presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum (FoCI). Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Mcswain, M. & Dil, T. (2017, April 4-5). Tiger Gardens: Educating Future Generations on Health and Sustainability. Presented at the 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
Thavarajah, D., *Anderson, J., *Chaney, J., *Chapman, M., *Cox, B., *Erwin, D., *Fisher, A., *Kay, J., *Mcswain, M., *Moore, H., *Shine, J. & *Abare, A. (2017, April 4-5). Tiger Gardens: Educating Future Generations on Health and Sustainability. Presented at the 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
Abare, A.*, Thavarajah, D., Abare, S.*, Smith, P., Fernandez, G., Thavarajah, P. (2016, April 16). Carolina grown Strawberry and Raspberry as a prebiotic carbohydrate rich whole food source to reduce obesity. South Carolina Academy of Sciences, Winthrop University.
*Alex Abare: Outstanding senior for academic, research leadership Blue Key Award, Phi Kappa Phi Certificate of Merit , Distinguished Agronomist recognized as a part of this CI for all these awards at the graduation ceremony 2017 spring
1. Clemson University Extension awarded $4000 to establish school gardens at Central and Pendelton Elementary School
Abare, A., Bell, J., Carruth, F., Chiu, C.*, Cox, B., Dahill, B., Edwards, R., Erwin, D., Kissell, D., Oswald, L., Randall, J., Webb, J., Yeargin, J., Agudelo, P. (Nov 1 2016). Clemson students share gardening knowledge with Pendelton Elementary students. Tiger Gardens Ci project. Clemson, SC.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1092

Mind Controlled 3D Printing

In this project, we explore a conceptual Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) by controlling a 3D printer with Electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. We currently have a lab-built printer and a lab-built a 2D that serves as a demo version, and a 3D printer that is the final goal. In addition, the team is exploring the usage of an open-source platform for EEG.

Team Leaders
Hugo Sanabria Physics and Astronomy
Accomplishments
*Bolick, P., *Sech, C., *Strohl, E., *Acosta, G., Sanabria, H. (2017, April). Mind to machine additive manufacturing . Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Bolick, P., *Willems, R., *Benson, C., *Wham W.H., *Mcmullen, D., *Moore, E.A. & Sanabria, H. (2016, April 6-7). Mind controlled 3D printing. Presented at the 11th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
College of ScienceG
1095

Nutrient Acquisition and Utilization in Toxoplasma gondii

Infection with Toxoplasma gondiiin people with compromised immune systems can result in severe morbidity and even lethality. A detailed mechanistic understanding of how Toxoplasmaparasites metabolize nutrients will contribute to identifying new targets to impact disease.

Team Leaders
Zhicheng Dou Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Davis Osborn, a former senior undergraduate student, finished his honor thesis in my lab. Now he is a MD student at the Medical University of South Carolina.
KTEF Pediatric Ophthalmology Career-Starter Research Grant PI-Dou 07/01/2016 - 06/30/2018 Knights Templar Eye Foundation Regulation of proteolytic activity within a digestive vacuole in Toxoplasma gondii, the most common pathogen causing infectious posterior uveitis in infants and children
During last academic year, the lab secured a research grant from Knights Templar Eye Foundation. The amount is ~65,000 for one year. The grant can be renewed for another year if the progress is satisfactory.
The lab secured a research grant from Knights Templar Eye Foundation. The award amount is ~$65,000 for one year. The grant can be renewed one more year if the progress is satisfactory.
College of ScienceG
1549

The role of acetate metabolism in fungal pathogenesis

Invasive fungal infections cause nearly one and a half million deaths annually, accounting for nearly 50% of all AIDS-related deaths. Cryptococcus neoformans, an invasive opportunistic pathogen of the central nervous system, is the most frequent cause of fungal meningitis. Exposure to C. neoformans is common, as it is an environmental fungus found in the soil that can enter the lungs through inhalation and disseminate to the central nervous system in susceptible individuals. An increased rate of infection occurs in individuals with impaired cell-mediated immunity, particularly those with AIDS and recipients of immunosuppressive therapy. The widespread availability of antiretroviral therapy in developed countries has helped improve the immune systems of many HIV patients to decrease their susceptibility to infection. However, cryptococcal meningitis is still a major problem in resource-limited regions of the world such as sub-Saharan Africa where HIV prevalence is high and access to healthcare is limited. The CDC estimates the yearly burden of cryptococcal meningitis to be nearly one million cases with more than 190,000 deaths. Despite the global significance of cryptococcal meningitis, current treatments are inadequate as the gold standard therapy is based on half century old drugs that have a wide range of liabilities and shortcomings. Metabolic adaptability and flexibility are important attributes for fungal pathogens to successfully infect and cause disease. Although carbon metabolism is critical for virulence in C. neoformans, very little is known about which carbon sources are utilized during infection. Our long-term goal is to provide a better understanding of how Cryptococcus can adapt its metabolism to survive in the changing environments encountered during infection. Developing a more in-depth understanding of the metabolism and physiology of this pathogen during infection may facilitate identification of suitable targets for new antifungal therapies.

Team Leaders
Kerry Smith Genetics and Biochemistry
College of ScienceG
1099

Object Use in Individuals with Autism

For this project, students will explore how individuals with autism interact with everyday objects.  

Team Leaders
Jennifer Bisson Psychology
Accomplishments
*Paul, T., *Davis, A., Bisson, J. (2019, April). How affordable is it? Autism severity and object affordances. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Doghman, M., *Collins, K., *Campbell, C., Bisson, J., *Kwon, J. (2017, April). How Many Can You Find? : The Effect of an Autism Spectrum Disorder on Object Perception. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Bisson, J., *Fant, C., *Tomberlin, C., *Keramati, C. (2017, April). Sleeping Hard or Hardly Sleeping: Differences in Nighttime Waking for Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1120

An Examination of Death in Pickens County

In this project, students build a spatial database of coroner records from Pickens County, SC. Students develop skills in database management and GIS software to understand the patterns of death in the county over time. 

Team Leaders
Katherine Weisensee Sociology and Anthropology
Accomplishments
*Martinson, C., *Cory, L., *Hudson, H., *Johnson, K., *Wright, S., Weisensee, K. (2019, April). Gunshot Wound Interpretation: Correlations Between Locality and Manner of Death. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Marcotte, A., *Whetstone, A., *Shillinglaw, A., *Couch Hoffman, A., *Rhodes, E., *Anderson, K., *Lucas, M., *Schweikert, M., Weisensee, K. (2016, April). Spatial Analysis of Deaths in Pickens County, SC. Poster presentation at Clemson University 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1138

3D printing Architected Electrodes

This CI focuses on the research of 3D printing of pastes, a.k.a. robocasting, to create complex architected WC structures with unprecedented versatility. The paste to print is a composite of biopolymers and oxide nanoparticles. Once printed, these biopolymer composite architectures are heat treated to high temperatures to yield tungsten carbide. The electrical properties of these architected carbide shapes are then measured under mechanical load. The goal is to elucidate the relation between processing, the microstructure of the material, and the electrical and mechanical performance of the structure. Understanding such relation will enable the fabrication of electrically-conductive structures with optimized properties towards achieving structural batteries, fuel cells and capacitors. More details are in www.multiscalemanufacturing.net 

Team Leaders
Rodrigo Martinez-Duarte Mechanical Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1146

Getting to Mars Using Microorganisms

This CI is about engineering microbial system to use resources available in space to make the things astronauts need to survive. 

Team Leaders
Mark Blenner Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Michael Spagnuolo
Accomplishments
*Nolan, M., *Martin, B., *Mabry, L., Spanuolo, M. & Blenner, M. (2019, April). Getting to Mars Using Microorganisms. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1150

Innovations in Bioinstrumentation

Bioinstrumentation is an interdisciplinary subject of applying physical principles and mechanical, electronic and chemical engineering technologies to acquire, analysis and display information from cells, tissues, organs and entire organisms including the human body. This CI was created to allow students to design and build their own bioinstrumentation and/or wearable biomedical technology projects. (Instrumentation class/experience is a pre-requisite for this team)

Team Leaders
Delphine Dean Bioengineering
Lucas Schmidt Bioengineering
Melissa McCullough Bioengineering
Tyler Harvey Bioengineering
Vipul Pai Raikar Bioengineering
Hetal Maharaja Bioengineering
Accomplishments
Dean, D., Demore, N., *Slaney, S., *Wilson, J. R., III, *Jordan, C., & McCullough, M. (2016). U.S. Provisional Patent No. 62/379,883. Washington, DC: U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.Titanium clip detectors and methods of detection.
Patent filed, , "Titanium Clip Detectors and Methods of Detection", D. Dean, N. Demore, S. Stanley, J.R. Wilson III, C. Jordan, M. McCullough, Provisional Patent Application No.: 62/379,883, 2016
Finalist in the BMES Instrumentation Design competition (top 8 finish) in *Scott Slaney, *Joey Wilson, and *Cody Jordan. They presented their work on the Breast Clip Detector at BMES in Oct. 2017.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1152

Marine Ecology

Marine ecology is an interdisciplinary field of study that integrates research efforts of marine science, conservation biology, evolutionary ecology, oceanography, and fisheries science.  The goal of marine ecology research is to understand the abiotic and biotic factors that influence the interactions of marine life with their environment.  Students in the Marine Ecology Creative Inquiry team will conduct research on the ecology of Caribbean spiny lobsters and coral reef fishes in response to changes in water quality and habitat quality in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.  Field research will be conducted during 2 months in the summer and two week-long research trips in the spring and fall semesters.  Students with SCUBA certification will be trained to conduct data collection as a scientific diver.  Students will be expected to enroll for 2-6 semesters and will present their research at local and national conferences. Senior students with sufficient experience will have an opportunity to develop senior thesis research questions of their own design. 

Team Leaders
Kara Noonan Biological Sciences
Kylie Smith Biological Sciences
Michael Childress Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Mccomb, S., Childress, M. (2019, April). Using Acoustic Telemetry to Study Homing Behavior in Juvenile Caribbean Spiny Lobsters. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Gardner, M., *Ingrum, I., Noonan, K., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 April 4-5) Effects of Hurricane Irma on reef community structure in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Poster Presentation at the Clemson University Student Research Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Whitaker, S., *Hulsey, R., Collins, M., *Way, E., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 April 2-3) A tail of two territories: gender differences in the territories of stoplight parrotfish, Sparisoma viride. Poster Presentation at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Jeanes, R., *Miller, E., *Stroud, C., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 April 2-3) Responses of transplanted and natural coral colonies to thermal stress events. Poster Presentation at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Gardner, M., *Ingrum, I., Noonan, K., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 March 10) Effects of Hurricane Irma on reef community structure in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Poster Presentation at the Clemson University Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Whitaker, S., *Hulsey, R., Collins, M., *Way, E., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 March 10) A tail of two territories: gender differences in the territories of stoplight parrotfish, Sparisoma viride. Poster Presentation at the Clemson University Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Jeanes, R., *Miller, E., *Stroud, C., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 March 10) Responses of transplanted and natural coral colonies to thermal stress events. Poster Presentation at the Clemson University Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Gardner, M., *Ingrum, I., Noonan, K., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 March 1) Effects of Hurricane Irma on reef community structure in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Poster Presentation at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Clemson, SC.
*Whitaker, S., *Hulsey, R., Collins, M., *Way, E., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 March 1) A tail of two territories: gender differences in the territories of stoplight parrotfish, Sparisoma viride. Poster Presentation at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Clemson, SC.
*Jeanes, R., *Miller, E., *Stroud, C., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2018 March 1) Responses of transplanted and natural coral colonies to thermal stress events. Poster Presentation at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Clemson, SC.
*Krachman, H. & Childress, M. (2017) The investigation of Exploratory and social behaviors in Panulirus argus. Presented as Fall 2017 Honors Thesis Presentation, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Whitaker, S., Hulsey, R., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2017) Territorial characteristics in adult parrotfish. Presented as Fall 2017 Senior project, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
Rolfe, S. & Childress, M. (2017) The influences of social behavior on lobster dispersal. Presented as Fall 2017 Senior project, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Whitaker, S., *Rolfe, S., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2017, September 29) Conservation of Marine Resources Summer Research blog. Presented at the 2017 Creative Inquiry Summer Research Showcase, Clemson, SC.
Jeanes, R., Miller, E., *Stroud, C., Smith, K. & Childress, M. (2017, September 22) Responses of transplanted and natural coral colonies to thermal stress events. Presented at the College of Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Dubnicka, I.; *Ehlers, A.; *Ehlert, A.; *Guryan, T.; *Krachman, H.; *Rolfe, S.; *Sims, R.; Stroud, C.; *Towe, A.;*Whitaker, S.; Smith, K.; Childress, M. Forecasting the Future of Coral Reef Communities. April 6,2017. Digital poster presentation at the annual Focus On Creative Inquiry Poster Forum.
*Guryan, T; *Sims, R; Smith, K; Childress, M. Clean Freaks: Neon gobies facilitate reef herbivore diversity. Poster presentation at the annual Clemson University Biological Sciences Annual Student Symposium, Clemson, SC.
Childress, M. and Bertelsen, R. (2017, April 12-16). Den sharing and den fidelity in juvenile spiny lobsters. Oral presentation at the annual meeting of Benthic Ecology Meeting, Myrtle Beach, SC.
*Rolfe, S., *Stroud, C., *Towe, A., *Sims, R., and Smith, K. (2017, April 12-16). Damsels in Distress: Influence of reef composition on abundance and behavior of damselfishes. Poster presentation at the annual meeting of Benthic Ecology Meeting, Myrtle Beach, SC.
*Whitaker, S., *Ehlert, A., and Smith, K. (2017, April 12-16). Greener Futures: Substrate preferences explain variation in social structure in two species of parrotfishes. Poster presentation at the annual meeting of Benthic Ecology Meeting, Myrtle Beach, SC.
*Dubnicka, I., *Krachman, H., *Ehlert, A., and Childress, M. (2017, April 12-16). Behavioral plasticity and the loss of social behaviors in juvenile spiny lobsters. Poster presentation at the annual meeting of Benthic Ecology Meeting, Myrtle Beach, SC.
*Krachman, H. Calhoun Honors College Research Grant, March, 2017 - $500
*Guryan, T. Calhoun Honors College Research Grant, March, 2017 - $500
Guryan, T. Calhoun Honors College Research Grant, November, 2016 - $500
Sigma Xi Research Grant - *Thomas Guryan $1000
Smith, K. Clemson University Professional Enrichment Grant - $750
$900 raised for Spring Break trip to conduct research in the Florida Keys. We raised this money through various fundraisers including bake sales, Krispy Kreme, Groucho’s, Go Fund Me, TDs, and other personal donations.
*Guryan, T. Sigma-Xi Grants in Aid of Research, March, 2017- $1000
Departmental Honors Grant - *Thomas Guryan $500
*Guryan, T. Outstanding Undergraduate. Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University
College of ScienceG
1199

Animal Model Tissue Biopsy Device Design

Tissue biopsies are often performed on patients to help diagnose many types of cancers. Biopsies are obtained using commercially available devices which can be difficult to use. Students in this Creative Inquiry have iteratively designed and created a working prototype of a semi-automated biopsy needle medical device with improved ergonomic handling. The focus of this Creative Inquiry moving forward will be to perform verification and validation testing on the new design.

Team Leaders
Jeremy Mercuri Bioengineering
Heather Dunn Animal & Veterinary Sciences
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1157

A.R.C.H.E.R. (Accessible Recreational Creations to Highlight Educational Reach) Design Works

Design targeted solutions with the ARCHER (Accessible Recreational Creations to Highlight Educational Reach) Design Works Creative Inquiry! Archery has been integrated into the physical education curriculum in K-12 schools across the state of South Carolina. However, students with disabilities can’t always participate fully. Through the ARCHER creative inquiry, Clemson students can design and develop engineering solutions to help these students experience the excitement that comes with hitting the bullseye. Clemson students will be paired with a K-12 student with a disability and will spend the semesters enrolled getting to know the K-12 student, learning about the PE archery program and current adaptive sports techniques, and designing and developing a prototype device to assist the K-12 student in archery competition.  

Team Leaders
Meredith Owen Bioengineering
John D DesJardins Bioengineering
Accomplishments
*Barringer, C., *Bove, C., *Burnette, A., *Dow, N., *Lipold, J., *O'Leary, K., *Piel, T., *Chernick, A., *Fratus, R., *Owen, M., DesJardins, J. (2019, April). Development of Custom Assistive Devices for K12 Participation is Archery. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
DesJardins, J. D., Owen, M., *Banaszak, B., *Benson, R., *Coeyman, S., *Elie, B., *Grant, M., *Guo, H., *Harley, J., *Hendrix, H., *Horkan, M., *Nance, E., *Teal, E. (2017, April 5). Design of Assistive Needs Devices for Kids in Sport. Presented at the 12th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1160

Child Development

The goal of this CI team is to better understand parent-child interactions, taking special consideration to how the dynamics of the child’s personality and temperament impact the quality of these interactions. We currently have three ongoing projects 1) how parent-child attachment develops during the first year of infancy into toddlerhood and child as well as parental and child factors that impact attachment; 2) how parents and non-parents perceive and respond to infant crying and toddler temper tantrums; and 3) how parents and non-parents handle multitasking and/or focusing on specific tasks (like driving), when hearing negative emotions from their children, such as infant crying or toddler/child temper tantrums, particularly with how it impacts parents’ own emotion regulation, attention, and physiological reactions? 

Team Leaders
Sarah Sanborn Psychology
Jennifer Bisson Psychology
Accomplishments
*Burger, A., *Huffman, M., *Denny, L., *Dennis, D., *Sanborn, S., Bisson, J. (2019, April). Keep calm and parent on: Gender differences in parent stress. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1563

Education and Entitlement: Improving Learning Environments through Student Input

How does student feedback manifest in instructional change? Can student voices make a difference in their own education? What are the boundaries between student input and instruction design? These are the questions we seek to answer in this Creative Inquiry. With a focus on how and when student voices can impact design education, specifically in undergraduate education in general, we seek to understand how student feedback can inform and contribute actively to the learning environment. This is our opportunity to be proactive in the learning process and shape the course evaluation procedures in order to make our voices impactful.

Team Leaders
Winifred Newman Architecture,Arts & Humanities
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
1162

The History of the Clemson House

The Clemson House, built in 1950, was the center of campus and community life, its central importance indicated by its distinctive "modern" structure, its visible location on the hill overlooking Bowman Field, and its iconic neon sign.  The Clemson House project aims to record the memories of those who stayed at the Clemson House as a hotel, ate in its famous restaurant, worked there, held activities there, or lived there as a students.  Like people, buildings have "lives" and the purpose of this CI is to record and publish those memories as well as provide a history of the famous building. While this has been an ongoing project for the past two years, the plan is to complete the text of the history of the Clemson House, including people's recollections and memories of the building, this fall and hopefully publish the book in the spring (2020).  Students who have not been involved in the project previously will be given some training in historical methods and information on Clemson University's history.

Team Leaders
C Alan Grubb History
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
1172

Investigation of carbon fiber composites strengthened with carbon nanotubes

The goal of this CI is to understand the effect of carbon nanotubes impregnated into carbon fiber prepreg. The presence of the nanotubes is supposed to increase the interlaminar strength by 10-15%. Aerospace grade carbon fiber prepreg, with and without carbon nanotubes, will be laid up to create specimens for testing and characterization. Students will learn about anisotropic material behavior, carbon fiber fabrication techniques, and how to perform experiments and analysis. Experiments include quasi-static behavior and impact testing.

Team Leaders
Garrett Pataky Mechanical Engineering
Andrew Cannon Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Accomplishments
*Argenal, A., *Matthews, D., *Wilkie, A., *Pataky, G., *Cannon, A. (2019, April). Nanotube Reinfoced Carbon Fiber Composites. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Smyre, M., *Wade, D. & Pataky, G.J. (2018, April 2-3) Bistable Composites Snap Through Characterization. Poster presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Guy Kemmann completed his B.S. and is continuing on with Dr. Myers as a graduate student.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1636

Pre-service Teacher Instruction Using Mixed-Reality Simulators

Mixed-reality simulators provide opportunities for pre-service teachers to practice and reflect on the implementation of academic instruction and behavioral supports before entering the classroom. This Creative Inquiry will provide opportunities for project students to use, facilitate and research a mixed-reality simulator supporting the instruction of pre-service special education and general education teachers.  Participants will learn a variety of evidence based practices to support the behavior needs and academic growth of students in classrooms. Using the simulator, these instructional techniques can be personalized, practiced and retried in a realistic, non-threatening environment without risking harm to "real" students. In addition, this Creative Inquiry Project will support a research study evaluating the effectiveness of simulations in teacher education as well as the participant's views of the simulator.

Team Leaders
Sharon Walters
Shanna Hirsch Education & Human Dev
1187

Career Pathways in Sociology: Exploring Professional Identity and Career Development

Sociology majors often face challenges when trying to explain “sociology” and “sociology jobs” to their parents, friends, and employers. This Creative Inquiry will provide students with hands-on qualitative (and some quantitative) research experience on a project about applied sociology, the application of sociology beyond academia and traditional practice settings. Together, we will engage in collaborative research that will make a direct contribution to several ongoing efforts related to the occupational pathways of sociology graduates.    Students will participate in data collection from sociology undergraduate and graduate students at several institutions, from sociologists working in non-academic settings, and from leaders in the field, thus presenting a great opportunity to network.  We will conduct in-depth interviews and surveys, based on our research.The results of our work will be used to develop a variety of publications, including marketing materials for the general sociology curriculum and general information about social science research careers. Students will have an opportunity to present the results at research conferences.  We also hope to feature our research in conference workshops for sociology majors and others interested in learning more about our methods and outcomes.  The findings will also be used to develop career resources and grant proposals.  Thus, the CI will provide students with valuable professional development opportunities that can help to advance their career goals in the field.

Team Leaders
F Catherine Mobley Sociology and Anthropology
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1195

Research into emotion and its expression

We study emotions, emotion expressions, and reactions to cute stimuli. All of these topics are examined through the lens of psychology and consumer behavior. 

Team Leaders
Oriana Aragon Marketing
Accomplishments
Aragón, O.R. (2018 April 4-5). Dimorphous Expressions of Emotion. Presentation at the 2018 Clemson Student Research Symposium, Clemson SC.
Our Lab Team Spring 17' We worked on (1) theoretical understanding of gender and the expression of emotions, (2) finding of actors to create new stimuli, and (3) theoretical understanding and a series of empirical studies investigating attentional habituation to cute stimuli. We had a great semester!
College of BusinessD
1417

Football Facemask Performance Creative Inquiry

In this CI, we will be working with the local Daniel High School football team to study the effect of a season of head impacts has on the performance of football facemasks.  We will be studying the performance of facemasks with ages ranging from brand new to a year of use.

Team Leaders
Gregory Batt Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
Andrea Fisher Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
Accomplishments
*Longacre, A., *Mantia, A., *Sall, A., Batt, G., *Fisher, A. (2019, April). Effect Of High School Football Season Impacts On Facemasks. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1196

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) Films

Positive behavior interventions and support (PBIS) is a proactive and respectful approach for supporting all students in a school or group. In 2010, the PBIS Film Festival premiered at the Association of Positive Behavior Support (APBS) conference.  Each year the PBIS Film Festival receives dozens of film submissions from all over the globe. During the PBIS Film Festival we screen about a dozen exemplar PBIS films. The purpose of this Creative Inquiry is to (a) provide students with a hands-on experience supporting a film festival while they learn about schools are using film to support K-12 and (b) conduct a study to better understand how schools are using film.   

Team Leaders
Shanna Hirsch Education & Human Dev
Accomplishments
*Baytes, A., *Black, C., *Pesicka, M., *Pilot, E., Walters, S., *Hirsch, S. (2019, April). Unpacking the Movie Magic: An Analysis of PBIS Films from 2015-2019. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Hirsch, S., *Rice, J. & *Marcus, K. (2018, April 24). Voices of Positive Behavior Intervention and Support (PBIS) Film Creators: In-Depth Interviews on PBIS Film Development and Implementation. Poster presentation at the Clemson College of Education Research Forum, Clemson, SC.
Hirsch, S., *Withington, M., *Wyche, M., *Ruddy, S., *Halley, E., *Harleston, M., *Fox, A., & *Brown, C. (2018, April 24). Positive behavior interventions and support in pictures: A descriptive analysis of existing PBIS Videos. Poster presentation at the Clemson College of Education Research Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Brown, C., *Fox, A., *Halley, E., *Harleston, M., *Withington, M., *Wyche, M., *Ruddy, S., Hirsch, S. (2018, April 2-3). Positive behavior interventions and support in pictures: A descriptive analysis of existing PBIS Videos. Poster presented at the 1st Annual Clemson Student Research Forum, Clemson, SC.
Hirsch, S. E., Marcus, K., Rice, K., Ennis, R., & MacSuga-Gage, A. S. (2017, September, Pending Acceptance). Views of PBS Film Makers: What and why we make PBS Films. PBIS Forum, Chicago, IL.
College of EducationE
1590

Taking Context Seriously: Collecting and analyzing location-based data

In this Creative Inquiry, students will explore the importance of context in social science research. After exploring the types of contextual data that are publicly available (such as data from the U.S. Census and Bureau of Labor Statistics), students will learn how to combine contextual data with individual-level data to more completely understand people’s attitudes and behaviors. Students will first develop these skills with existing data from the from the Creative Inquiry mentor, but after this initial application, they will then be encouraged to repeat the process with data that more align with their own interests. In the process, students will improve and expand their ability to use geographic software – ArcGIS – and statistical software – such as Stata or R. As such, this Creative Inquiry aims to help students develop data collection and analysis skills for both academic, industry, and applied settings.

Team Leaders
Ethan Busby Political Science

College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1591

Designing Caring Environments for Mothers and Infants Affected by Addiction

The environment of caring surrounding mothers and infants affected by addiction includes consideration of physical space design as well as approaches to prevent stigma of families that can be marginalized by society. Perinatal substance exposure is the exposure of mothers and infants to legal and illicit substances during pregnancy, delivery, postpartum period that may have effects on the mother and/or infant from those exposures. The Creative Inquiry will include opportunities to research the healthcare environment both physical and experiential of mothers and their infants who have experienced perinatal substance exposure.  Students will be an integral part of study proposal, data collection, analysis and dissemination of research surrounding the area approaches to care, designing the optimal patient and family room, unit, and facility to meet nursing protocols and architectural guidelines.   

Team Leaders
Mary Wright School of Nursing
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1209

Clemson Curates: Visual Arts & the Clemson Campus

Clemson Curates is a Creative Inquiry project focused on developing visual arts exhibits for the Clemson campus. Students from a variety of academic disciplines research, coordinate, and install artworks across campus.  Current exhibit locations include the ground floor of Sikes Hall and the CAAH Dean’s Gallery in Strode Tower and the Brooks Center for Performing Arts.    Clemson Curates presents visual arts exhibitions that explore ideas and issues reflective of and intersecting with Clemson University research.  Students gain experience by interpreting visual art, writing exhibit content, managing projects and presenting their research. Students explore various media platforms necessary for marketing and exhibition coordination, and conduct studio visits with artists to make final selection for artwork to be included in exhibits.

Team Leaders
Denise C Woodward-Detrich Art
Accomplishments
*Oliver, T., *Watson, M., Woodward-Detrich, D. (2019, April). Andy Warhol: Portraits and the Everyday. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Installation image for "Next UP Exhibition" at CAAH Dean's Gallery in Strode Tower
Panel discussion for the Upstate 8: SC Women Fellowship Recipients exhibition at Lee Gallery. 
South Carolina Arts Commission, non-competitive matching grant, 2000.00 awarded for Upstate 8: SC Fellowship Women Artists. The Exhibition was on View at Lee Gallery from October 2 - November 8, 2017 and was organized through the Clemson Curates Creative Inquiry course. Students participated in studio visits, selected exhibition works, participated in coordinating the panel discussion and installed the exhibit in Lee Gallery.
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
1211

Whats in Our Waters

The “What’s in Our Waters?” (WOW) educational outreach program, connects Clemson students with local high school classes to educate them about the human impact on local water systems, demonstrates techniques for water quality sampling, and communicates the results of a water quality studies at a local science conference. In this Creative Inquiry, the undergraduate students act as mentors in the WOW program, develop instructional videos of field sampling protocols for use by the mentors and other volunteers all across the southeast United States, and analyze the survey results from the high school students’ participation in the program. 

Team Leaders
Melissa Heintz Biological Sciences
Stephanie LaPlaca
Accomplishments
*Grear, G., *Taylor, A., Sampson, C., *Heintz, M. (2019, April). Overcoming Database Barriers to Successful Citizen Science Programs. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
Linard, E.N., Garcia-Chance, L., & Sampson, S. (2017, March). Clemson WOW Project: Success and Effectiveness of an Outreach Program. Presented at the 5th Annual Southeastern Environmental Education Alliance, Buford, GA.
Chance, L., Linard, E.,  and Sampson, C. (2016, October). Clemson WOW Project: Successes of a water quality outreach program. Poster presented at South Carolina Water Resources Conference, 
Garcia, L., Linard, E., and Sampson, C. (2017, April 7). "What's in Our Waters" Clemson GRADS. Presented at Clemson University, Clemson, SC. 
Pamphlet covering the WOW program designed and created by CI student. 
WOW students at work
CI Students engage in Georgia Adopt a Stream sampling
Video shows work done by students
ARJWS donated $140 to support prizes for the high school student scientific poster competition, as well as donating the time of their employees to serve as judges.
College of ScienceG
1212

Siemens Qualitative Marketing Research

This project will provide a hands-on learning experience in conducting qualitative research for theoretical and B2B insights for Siemens Corporation. 

Team Leaders
Jennifer Seimens Marketing
Anastasia Thyroff Marketing
Accomplishments
*Wink, H., *Wagner, A., *Huber, E., *Hack, B., *Ostermann, D., *McDowell, H., Thyroff, A., Seimens, J., *Dieterich, T., *Norman, C., *Robinson, I., *West, J., *Parsons, T., *Lynch, E. & *DeVonage, V. (2018, April 2-3). Understanding Knowledge Transference Between Generations. Presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*McDowell, H. (2018, March). Siemens Qualitative Marketing Research. Presented at the Board of Trustees Meeting, Madren Center, Clemson, SC.
College of BusinessD
1325

Sorghum as a feedstuff for gamebirds and broilers in the Southeast

This project aims to evaluate grain sorghum as an alternative feedstuff for gamebirds and broilers in the Southeast by investigating if it is nutritionally equivalent to corn for use in poultry diets. Aside from determining the apparent metabolizable energy of each dietary treatment, students will learn the components of formulating a diet, which will be essential to evaluating the growth, health and product quality of the birds. In addition, students calculating and analyzing diet formulations will be able to make projections for expected growth rates and performance of the birds as well as the economic costs and benefits of an alternative feedstuff. Students should expect to enroll in the CI project for 2-4 semesters.      

Team Leaders
Tiffany Wilmoth Animal & Veterinary Sciences
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1364

Happiness and Values

The purpose of this ongoing Creative Inquiry research team is to learn about and conduct research in the field of industrial-organizational psychology. We will explore how our values and their importance to us guide our judgment and decision-making on the pathways toward happiness, especially in circumstances where we must trade-off one option for another. The team will also examine whether or not the choices between two paths towards happiness are worthwhile or regrettable in the long-run.  For example, person A works at an organization and they have decided to work more hours at the office instead of spending more time with their family. Depending on which pathways someone values, this decision could make person A seem either hardworking or uncaring to an observer.  The students who participate on this research team will have the opportunity to see how work in empirical psychology is conducted. Our research is conducted with student samples and online samples, so team members will be exposed to various data collection techniques. In addition, students will gain experience in research design, data collection, and data analysis.

Team Leaders
Cynthia Pury Psychology
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1214

A Nursing/Engineering Collaboration to Solve Current Healthcare Problems

Current research shows that a Makerspace can help healthcare providers identify problems, create solutions, encourage collaboration and promote innovation. There is evidence of Makerspace programs available in healthcare facilities across the country; however, little is known about the implementation of Makerspace environments in undergraduate nursing education programs. This Creative Inquiry will initiate a collaborative between the Clemson University School of Nursing and the Watt Family Innovation Center. 

Team Leaders
Nancy K Meehan School of Nursing
Kristen Lawson Dean of Health,Educ,HumanDev
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1215

Perinatal Substance Exposure

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, or NAS occurs when babies are born with opioid dependence from mothers using opioids during late pregnancy. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports 3.9 of every 1,000 hospital births in 2013 were NAS babies in South Carolina (Ko, 2016). The purpose of the study is to understand the maternal experience battling substance exposure use and caring for an infant with substance exposure through story telling and disseminate our findings identified from the research.

Team Leaders
Heide Temples School of Nursing
Mary Wright School of Nursing
Accomplishments
Temples, HS, Wright, ME, *Chafe, O, *Drum, L, *Edwards, K, *Estrada, J, *Gutrie, E, *Hunter, C, *Johnson, E, *Lannamann, R, *Lautenschlager, C, *Mckee, H, *Rafalski, D, *Rumsey, J, *Shores, E, *Woody, B, *Yost, M.(2019, April). Stories of Mothers with Addiction and Recovery: A Qualitative Study. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Drum, L., Wright, M. & Temples, H. (2018, April 2-3). The Importance of Maternal Inclusion When Treating Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS): A Literature Review. Poster presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Drum, L., Wright, M. & Temples, H. (2018, April 4-8). The Importance of Maternal Inclusion When Treating Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS): A Literature Review. Poster presented at the National Students Nurses' Association 66th Annual Convention, Nashville, TN.
Drum, L., and Temples, H. S. (2017, April). Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome. Poster presented at the Focus on Creative Inquiry, 12th Annual Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1219

Entrepreneurial Mentoring: Lemonade Day

Lemonade Day is a community-wide educational program that teaches youth the entrepreneurial skills necessary to start, own and operate their own business...a lemonade stand. The CI project is a recurring activity each academic year engaging a new cohort of Clemson students. 

Team Leaders
Dave Frock Campus Recreation
1221

Human Factors Forensics

This project will explore the application of psychology and engineering principles to accident analysis.

Team Leaders
Benjamin R Stephens Psychology
Accomplishments
*Tutaj, M., *Martin, E., *Khoury, Z., *Free, K., *Giovinazzo, A., *Martin, T., *Cox, E. & Stephens, B. (2018, April) Human factors forensic analysis of trip and fall incident. Poster presented at the Southeaster Human Factors Applied Research Conference, Clemson, SC.
*Cox, R., *Free, K., *Giovinazzo, A., *Khoury, Z., *Martin, E., *Martin, T., *Tutaj, M. & Stephens, B. (2018, April 2-3). Human Factors Forensics of Child Elevator Accident. Poster presentation at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1224

The genetic and developmental basis of evolution in cichlid fishes

Research in this CI aims to understand the genetic basis of changes in development, which can produce diseases in humans and the incredible variation of animals found in nature. This project works at the intersection of developmental biology, genetics, and evolutionary biology. We focus on cichlid fishes of the East African Rift Lakes, which have evolved an incredible range of diversity in short evolutionary time.

Team Leaders
Kara Powder Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Martin, K.T., &Haire, S. & Powder, K. (2018, May). Genetic Variation in the Cranial Shape of Malawi Cichlids. Poster presentation at the Southeast Regional meeting of the Society for Developmental Biology, Athens, GA.
*Lally, M.E. & Powder, K. (2018, May). Gene expression analysis of migrating neural crest cells in craniofacial evolution in cichlid fishes. Poster presentation at the Southeast Regional meeting of the Society for Developmental Biology, Athens, GA.
*Hawkins, E., *Furno, E. & Powder, K. (2018, May). Cis-enhancing regions that influence craniofacial development in cichlids. Poster presentation at the Southeast Regional meeting of the Society for Developmental Biology, Athens, GA.
*Furno, E., *Hawkins, E. & Powder, K. (2018, April 2-3). Identifying cis-enhancing regions that influence craniofacial development in cichlid fishes. Poster presentation at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of ScienceG
1228

Taxonomic, genetic and functional diversity in lucinid-bacteria chemosymbiosis

Lucinid clams are the most diverse and one of the oldest families of chemosymbiotic bivalves commonly found in shallow coastal biomes. These clams fulfill most of their nutritional needs through gill endosymbionts which oxidize sulfur and use this chemical energy to fix carbon for their hosts. This Creative Inquiry project aims to characterize taxonomic, genetic and functional diversity in the lucinid-bacteria symbiosis. Students will use laboratory techniques, such as nucleic acid extractions, PCR, qPCR, as well as next generation sequencing technology to explore various aspects of the lucinid-bacteria symbiosis. Results will relate to microbe-microbe interactions, microbe-host interactions and microbe-environment interactions.

Team Leaders
Barbara Campbell Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Baldassare, M., *Nachman, E., *Walker, E., Campbell, B. (2019, April). 16S rRNA Gene and Metagenomic Analysis of Lucinid Clam Symbionts from the Bahamas . Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Alexander, L., Lim, S.J. & Campbell, B.J. (2018 April 4-5) Methanol dehydrogenase expression in two chemosymbiotic bacterial species in the lucinid clam Ctena orbiculata. Poster presented at the 2018 Clemson Student Research Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Nachman, E., Lim, S.J. & Campbell, B.J. (2017 September) Quantifying the expression of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation in symbionts of the lucinid clam Phacoides pectinatus. Poster presented at the Fall Research Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Walton, J.L., Gill, D.E., Lim, S.J. & Campbell, B.J. (2017 September) Symbiont Vitamin B12 Synthesis in Phacoides pectinatus. Poster presented at the Clemson University Undergraduate Research Showcase, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Alexander, L., Lim, S.J. & Campbell, B.J. (2018 April) Methanol dehydrogenase expression in two chemosymbiotic bacterial species in the lucinid clam Ctena orbiculata. Poster presented at the South Carolina Branch of the American Society for Microbiology Spring 2018 meeting, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC.
*Walton, J.L., Gill, D.E., Lim, S.J. & Campbell, B.J. (2018 March 10) Symbiont vitamin B12 synthesis in Phacoides pectinatus. Presented at the 10th annual Clemson Biological Annual Student Symposium, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Nachman, E., Lim, S.J. & Campbell, B.J. (2017 September) Quantifying the expression of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation in symbionts of the lucinid clam Phacoides pectinatus. Poster presented at the Fall Research Symposium, Clemson, SC.
*Alexander, L., Lim, S.J. & Campbell, B.J. (2018 March 10) Methanol dehydrogenase expression in two chemosymbiotic bacterial species in the lucinid clam Ctena orbiculata. Poster presented at the 10th annual Clemson Biological Annual Student Symposium, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
*Alexander, L., *Knight, B., *Nachman, E., *Walton, J., Lim, S.J. & Campbell, B.J. (2018 April 2-3) Gill microbiome diversity in Lucinidae clams. Poster presented at the 13th annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson University, Clemson, SC.
College of ScienceG
1235

Conation and Creativity in Engineering

Have you heard of Disney Imagineers? Are you interested in how engineers apply creativity? Conation and Creativity in Engineering (CCE) is a variable credit Creative Inquiry project in which students from across campus research instinctive problem-solving (conation) and creativity that inspires innovation in engineering around the world. Want to get even more immersed in creativity in engineering? Students are invited to participate in Disney Imaginations design competition, created and sponsored by Walt Disney Imagineering which seeks and natures the next generation of diverse Imagineers, and/or newly-established Creativity in Engineering Club, action-research student group dedicated to supporting creativity across Clemson's campus. All majors welcome. 

Team Leaders
Claire Dancz Engineering & Science Educatio
Blythe Steelman
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1265

International Collaborative Research with Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico

During Fall 2019, students will be introduced to various colleagues at Tec de Monterrey, Mexico. From their interactions, literature reading, discussion groups,  and guided mentorship, students will develop a research plan to execute at Clemson University, with the intention of visiting Monterrey sometime in the near future as the project reaches maturity.One or multiple projects will be identified that bring together interdisciplinary, multicultural and international interaction.

Team Leaders
Rodrigo Martinez-Duarte Mechanical Engineering
Hugo Sanabria Physics and Astronomy
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1247

Leidenfrost effect

A liquid drop brought into contact with a hot solid can levitate on a cushion of vapor. The absence of liquid/solid contact makes the liquid extremely mobile and susceptible to a number of hydrodynamic instabilities, such as shape oscillations, and directed self-propulsion. This CI project will focus on experimental studies of instabilities that result from the Leidenfrost effect; shape oscillation, self-propulsion, splashing, and bouncing. 

Team Leaders
Joshua Bostwick Mechanical Engineering
Accomplishments
Bostwick, J., *Hilleary, C., *Wallace, D., *Haithcock, E. & *Henke, J. (2018, April 2-3) The Effects of Specific Fluid Properties on the Leidenfrost Effect in Directed Motion. Presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1250

Science and Pseudoscience in popular media

The combination of access to information and the decline in science education and critical thinking ability have given rise to a fear of science and mistrust of scientists.  Because of the lack of understanding of science, charlatans like Dr. Oz are able to exploit the public’s fears for their own financial gain.  A few examples of what this exploitation has led to:  cancer patients refusing chemo therapy treatments in favor of questionable “natural” therapies; a subset of people have tried to “cure” their autistic children by giving them bleach enemas; and an increase in the production and marketing of dietary supplements promising to cure everything from obesity to cancer.  Because of ignorance, people can be the victims of scams and in the case of fad diets and supplements, can be harmed. In addition to the decline of science education, critical thinking, and difficulty identifying reliable sources of information, public attitude towards science and scientists is negative.  Scientists are harassed on a regular basis and are accused of being paid to do the bidding of large companies like Monsanto.  Additionally, these celebrities and charlatans mislead the public by saying science is wrong and that they are the only ones that are trustworthy.  This leads to fearmongering and a belief in conspiracy theories.   The proposed project seeks to help students and the general public tell the difference between science and pseudoscience and be able to evaluate claims seen in popular media, correct misconceptions about science, and to help students develop critical thinking skills through presenting their findings to a general audience.  The CI will help students explain science to a general audience and show people that science is relevant to their lives, approachable, and nothing to be afraid of.

Team Leaders
Elliot Ennis Chemistry
College of ScienceG
1641

Animal Fetal Ultrasonography

Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is a condition in which the developing fetus is smaller than it should be for its gestational age. In addition to the obvious problems for neonates and infants, the Barker hypothesis proposes that IUGR has a causal relationship to the origins of coronary heart disease, hypertension, and non-insulin-dependent diabetes in adult life. Restricted blood flow to the placenta and fetus is one of the causes of IUGR.  Animals are frequently used to study fetal development as a model for human disease. However, with the cumulative knowledge about the impact that fetal development and reprograming have in adult life, there is an increased interest on studying fetal development of domestic animals for the benefit of the animals themselves. In this research project, we will measure and standardize many of the normal parameters of fetal growth and blood flow in different domestic species, and within a specie, between different breeds. In addition, we will compare the fetal measurements and blood flow between experimental groups which we suspect are affecting intrauterine growth. Ultrasonography is currently the less invasive technique available to obtain accurate fetal measurements, including Doppler ultrasonography for placental and fetal blood flow; and therefore, it is the proposed method for this project. 

Team Leaders
Celina Checura Animal & Veterinary Sciences
Eric Walker Public Health Sciences
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1253

Ecotoxicological effects in aquatic species

This project investigates the effects of pollution on fish species, specifically the effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These toxic compounds are released during oil spills, and can enter waterways through road runoff. Effects we measure are upregulation of liver enzymes, excretion of metabolites in the bile, and cellular damage like membrane disintegration and DNA damage.

Team Leaders
Peter Van den Hurk Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Davis, R., *Hahn, J., *Mccomb, S., *Rogers, E., Van den Hurk, P. (2019, April). Lionfish (Pterois volitans) as biomonitoring species for oil pollution effects in coral reef ecosystems. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of ScienceG
1252

Appalachian Fire Ecology

Wildfires in late 2016 burned tens of thousands of forested acres across the southern Appalachian region. These events, unprecedented in recent history, have created a unique opportunity to conduct important fire ecology research in affected areas. This Creative Inquiry project is a collaborative effort between Clemson, the US Forest Service, and other agencies to assess the impacts of these fires, with a primary focus on the Rock Mountain fire in north Georgia. .

Team Leaders
Donald Hagan Forestry & Environment Conserv
Accomplishments
*Bailey, H., *Tate, B., *Sharpe, C., *Drose, R., *Williamson, C., Hagan, D., Vaughan, M. (2019, April). Overstory and understory responses to severe wildfire in the southern Appalachian mountains. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Anderson, J., *Christ, P., *Drose, R., *Sharpe, C., *Sparks, R., *Tate, B., *Williams, B., Hagan, D., Coyle, D.(2019, April). Controlling Callery Pear (Pyrus calleryana) with Prescribed Fire: Ecological and Management Considerations. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1640

Tangible genomics

This Creative Inquiry project will center upon genomics. The focus will be on structural variations with emphasis on mobile elements. Mobile elements, discovered by Barbara McClintock, are also often referred to as jumping genes or transposable elements.They are abundant in many genomes --e.g. more than 50% of the human genome is comprised of mobile elements. Transposable elements are associated with certain genetic disorders not only through insertion but also via recombination between elements. As part of this project, we will investigate different aspects of mobile element biology and how genomes evolve with respect to transposable elements. This Creative Inquiry has computational including programming as well as some wet-bench aspects. Furthermore, we will explore new approaches on how to visualize genomes with regard to mobile elements. This includes the developments of tangibles for data interaction.

Team Leaders
Miriam Konkel Genetics and Biochemistry
College of ScienceG
1256

Development and Assessment of Makerspace Standard Operating Procedures

The Clemson Makerspace provides students, faculty and staff the ability to collaborate and innovate using current technologies such as 3D-printers, laser cutters, a waterjet, 3D-scanners, textiles processing equipment, and electronics. The Makerspace educates and trains students of all majors on machines and processes. The objective of this project is to develop a safe set of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for training students on Makerspace equipment within the culture and requirements of the university.  

Team Leaders
Todd Schweisinger Mechanical Engineering
Matthew Samstag
Accomplishments
*Samstag, M., *Ghotbi-Taheri, P., *Gaidjunas, J., *Baum, J., *Hills, M., Schweisinger, T. (2019, April). Developing Standard Operating Procedures for the Artec Eva 3D Scanner . Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Hoolachan, N., *Grant, W., *Turner, N., *Patel, P., *Samstag, M. & Schweisinger, T. (2018, April 2-3). Student Engagement: Lowering the Barrier of Entry to The Clemson Makerspace, Digital presentation at Clemson University 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1258

Native Bass Conservation

Bartram's Bass is native to the Savannah River basin of SC and GA; it occurs nowhere else in the world. Students learn field sampling and lab techniques to learn more about the basic ecology of this rare fish. Students also have the opportunity to develop independent research projects and present results at professional conferences and in scientific publications. 

Team Leaders
Brandon Peoples Forestry & Environment Conserv
Kyle Brumm Forestry & Environment Conserv
Luke Bower
Accomplishments
*Moore, W., *Michaeli, A., *Bell, D., *Rodgers, A., Judson, E. & Peoples, B. (2018 March) Diet content analysis of Bartram's Bass--a Savannah River endemic. Poster presented at the Southern Chapter American Fisheries Society, San Juan, Puerto Rico
*Moore, W., *Michaeli, A., *Bell, D., *Rodgers, A., Judson, E. & Peoples, B. (2018 April 2-3) Diet content analysis of Bartram's Bass--a Savannah River endemic. Poster presented at the 13th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Poster Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Moore, W., *Michaeli, A., *Bell, D., *Rodgers, A., Judson, E. & Peoples, B. (2018 March) Diet content analysis of Bartram's Bass--a Savannah River endemic. Poster presented at the SC Chapter American Fisheries Society, Beaufort, SC.
*Moore, W., *Michaeli, A., *Bell, D., *Rodgers, A., Judson, E. & Peoples, B. (2018 March) Diet content analysis of Bartram's Bass--a Savannah River endemic. Poster presented at the Southern Division of American Fisheries Society, San Juan, Puerto Rico.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1270

High-Throughput Quantitative Western Blotting with the Microwestern Array

Genomic technologies, such as whole genome or mRNA sequencing, probe samples genome-wide at reasonable cost, but current technology to measure protein-level properties at a similar scale are lagging behind. Much biology occurs at the level of proteins and their modifications. This proposal focuses on further developing a technology called microwestern array to increase capacity and decrease cost of high-throughput protein-level measurements to complement genomic data.

Team Leaders
Marc Birtwistle Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Orrod Zadeh
Accomplishments
*Zadeh, O., *Westbury, B., *Interiano, W., *Huggins, J. (2019, April). Optimization of western blotting via mold-cast gel. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1271

Ocean under the magnifying glass - using microscopy to understand the impacts of climate change

Oysters are important to our coastal ecosystem, providing food in the aquaculture industry, protecting coastal fisheries and alleviating storm damage to the coastal land. The changing climate is, however, posing an alarming threat to the marine ecosystem. The excessive release of carbon dioxide by human activities has caused an acidified ocean with greater pH fluctuations. The impact has been found to be regional, pH values are found to reduce faster in estuary regions than the open ocean. As a result, the coastal oyster communities are facing an unprecedented risk. Our research focus on assessing the health of the native oysters Crassostrea virginica. Microscopy techniques are sensitive to the physiological status, and therefore, oysters can be monitored for their success in terms of growth, development and calcification. The goals of this Creative Inquiry projects are (1) to develop students with the skillset for marine science and climate change research, (2) to raise appreciation and understanding of an oyster life cycle, (3) to promote image analysis skills for biology topics and (4) to enable student's experience for research planning, performing, writing and presenting.   Students will conduct ocean acidification study on oysters using confocal microcopy and image analysis tools such as ImageJ and MATLAB to measure the response and development of shell formation process.

Team Leaders
Andrew Mount Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Stewart, J., *Groce, M., *Hickman, N., Mount, A. (2019, April). Observations of anatomical elements of shell repair in the Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of ScienceG
1272

Elucidating Water Transport and Structure of Polymer Membranes for Energy Applications

The use of polymer membranes for energy storage and delivery applications is ubiquitous. The performance properties of these membranes is inherently tied to the nanostructure, making it important to elucidate the fundamental structure-property relationships of these materials.

Team Leaders
Eric Davis Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1282

Development of a System to Incentivize Litter Storage/Collection in Developing Areas

Widespread litter, comprised in large measure of plastic bags, plastic beverage containers, paper, and assorted refuse, vexes large parts of the world, particularly under-developed regions where there is no centralized trash and garbage collection.  A practical means of involving the local population in collecting and transporting accumulated litter to central collection points and establishing incentives for participation is a potential solution.  An important component of such an approach is thought to be the development of a practical process to enable single individuals to compact litter into small, manageable units, for which they could be compensated on a piece by piece basis, somewhat like collecting deposits on discarded beverage containers in some communities.  Accordingly, the following effort is proposed:   Develop a means of compacting litter into dense units that can be transported easily to central collection facilities by personal conveyances such as bicycles, motorcycles, push carts, bicycle rickshaws, and bullock carts   Apparatus employed should be amenable to local fabrication from readily available materials, including recycled automobile and bicycle parts, scrap metal, and the like, using modest welding, blacksmithing, and fabrication methods commonly found in undeveloped regions.  Any method or materials used to bind compacted litter into stable units should be derived from litter components.

Team Leaders
Todd Schweisinger Mechanical Engineering
Cecil Huey Mechanical Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1430

Translation of signal transduction pathways into computational models

Cells integrate signals from different external stimuli to decide their fate: to continue growing, to divide, or to die. They do so by using different signaling cascades and mathematical modeling of such systems can help us understand the cells’ behavior. This proposal aims to translate cellular signaling pathways into computational models. Writing out the exact reactions happening in the cells, we can create a network of interactions and thereof a model that can be simulated and studied. An already existing model will be used as a template to obtain the one of a kind whole cell model.

Team Leaders
Cemal Erdem Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Marc Birtwistle Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Accomplishments
*Buda, K., *Brackett, C., *Slenkovich, N., *Erdem, C., *Birtwistle, M. (2019, April). Translating Signal Transduction Pathways into Mathematical Models by INDRA. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1289

CEDC Bio-Digester Development for Haiti

CEDC Biodigesters Development for Haiti - Haiti does not have infrastructure to protect the population with systems that supply clean water and treat human waste.  This Team will leverage the existing working prototypes in Cange and Corporant to create an execution plan for the Central Plateau of Haiti. 

Team Leaders
David Vaughn Engineering,Computing,Appl Sci
Ian Stewart Physics and Astronomy
Jessica Dooley Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
Max Pawlick
Accomplishments
*Sarver, H., *Azzara, M., *Sinkevitch, J., *Naab, R., Vaughn, D., *Mills, A., *Osten, N., *Stewart, I. (2019, April). Biodigesters. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Stewart, I., *Dara, A., *Sarver, H., *Falconer, R., *Mills, A., Gabbard, C. & Vaughn, D. (2018 May 27). CEDC - Biodigesters. Poster presented at CEDC Spring 2018 Summit at the Humanitarian Engineering Research and Design Studio, Pendleton, SC
*Mills, A., *Dara, A. & *Stewart, I. (2017, December 8) CEDC Summit - Biodigester Expansion Across the Central Plateau of Haiti. Poster presented at the CEDC Fall 2017 Semester Summit held at the Humanitarian Engineering Research and Design Studio, Pendleton, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1291

CEDC - Water Analysis for Haiti

CEDC Water Analysis The water analysis program at Clemson uses remote sensing technology to provide automated reporting of water conditions across a wide area of parameters that indicate compliance or non-compliance with WHO standards.  One of the issues that has been identified is that many of the world standard instruments are currently at a price point that is not economically feasible for most resource constrained environments.  This Team will reverse engineer a cost effective solution that uses low cost sensors and will test them against the world standard instrumentation.  The intent will be to create a deployable module that can report water quality remotely for a price point that is less than $350.

Team Leaders
David Vaughn Engineering,Computing,Appl Sci
Jessica Dooley Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
Max Pawlick
Accomplishments
*Black, H., *Leonard, S., *Rosenberger, P., Hiles, H., Garcia, D., *McCaffrey, W., *Osten, N., Mussro, B., Ladner, D. & Vaughn, D. (2018 May 27). CEDC - Water Analysis. Poster presented at CEDC Spring 2018 Summit at the Humanitarian Engineering Research and Design Studio, Pendleton, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1293

CEDC - Morne Michel Roadway

CEDC - Morne Michel Water System – Phase 1  Morne Michel is a remote village in Haiti located in the mountains about a three hour hike away from Cange where Clemson Engineers for Developing Countries focuses most of their efforts. While interning in Haiti, Aaron Gordon worked in Morne Michel to make improvements on the school and church. He  noticed that the village had no access to a clean water source and that people living there had to face dangerous conditions to climb down the mountain to collect water for use. The water tested positive for fecal coliforms over the limit of 200 colonies per 100 mL of water and so work began to find a way to provide a safer, cleaner water source for the village.

Team Leaders
David Vaughn Engineering,Computing,Appl Sci
Jessica Dooley Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
Lisa Uy General Engineering
Max Pawlick
Accomplishments
*Donahue, R., *Hoffman, R., *Uy, L., *Hummel, G., Vaughn, D., Dooley, J. (2019, April). Road to Morne Michel. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Uy, L., *Donahue, R., *Dooley, J. & *Hoffman, R. (2017, December 08). CEDC Summit - Morne Michel Water Project.  Poster presented at CEDC Fall 2017 Semester Summit held at the Humanitarian Engineering Research and Design Studio, Pendleton, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1296

CEDC Directors

CEDC operates as a mini global corporation with student leadership at all levels. Students self-govern and organize into functional groups and project related groups with an executive group of students providing oversight. 

Team Leaders
David Vaughn Engineering,Computing,Appl Sci
Alexander Arzon
Rob Smith
Madison Stanley Student Health Center
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1300

CEDC - Hydropower for Cange, Haiti

CEDC Hydropower for Cange, Haiti  Zanmi Lasante and the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti have a compound that they operate in Cange, Haiti that has numerous operations that run continuously through the year which are impaired due to inconsistent power and the high cost of electricity.   Project Description - The project team will draft a scope document that will seek funding to create a solution to supply consistent power to the Zanmi Lasante Compound by using local natural resources, dramatically reducing the annual cost for electricity.  

Team Leaders
David Vaughn Engineering,Computing,Appl Sci
Jessica Dooley Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
Max Pawlick
Accomplishments
*Shankar, S., *Phillips, Christina; *Hippert, G. & *Ramos, M. (2017, December 8) CEDC - Cange Hydroelectric Power.  Poster presented at the CEDC Fall 2017 Semester Summit held at the Humanitarian Engineering Research and Design Studio, Pendleton, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1307

CEDC - Center of Excellence in Cange Haiti

CEDC Center of Excellence in Cange, Haiti - Clemson University is uniquely positioned to become the Nexus that will catalyze change by unifying governments, NGOs, financial institutions, the private sector, and other academic institutions while delivering sustainable solutions. As a public land-grant university, we are uniquely positioned to develop bold new ideas, foster international cooperation, and navigate the politics needed to brighten the future for everyone. We have performed extensive work in Haiti and Tanzania. Thus, to develop the most cost effective solution, we propose to export the best practices and institutional knowledge from Tanzania to Haiti. Our proposal is to launch a pilot in the Central Plateau of Haiti for five years and then expand the efforts in Haiti while launching to two new countries.

Team Leaders
David Vaughn Engineering,Computing,Appl Sci
Christian Jones Student Athletic Academic Svs
Jennifer Paloni Experiential Education
Riley Garvey Student Services
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1313

Pathways to Engineering

There are many pathways to an engineering degree, but all of them pass through calculus.  Some students complete first semester calculus in high school and start their post-secondary studies ahead of the game, or at least not behind.  Others complete calculus in high school, but nonetheless, place into courses below calculus at the start of college. Still others do not attempt calculus in high school.  In South Carolina, there is a significant racial and socioeconomic disparity between engineering students who place below calculus and those who enter college calculus-ready.  In this project, we analyze qualitative focus-group and interview data from first-year engineering students around the state to understand both academic and non-academic factors that affected their initial mathematics placement in college.

Team Leaders
Eliza Gallagher Engineering & Science Educatio
Aubrie Pfirman Engineering & Science Educatio
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1309

FishShapes: exploring the evolution of body form diversity across fishes.

Students will join a team of scientists from across the US that are working to investigate body shape evolution across teleost fishes. Teleosts account for 96% of all fish species, nearly half of extant vertebrate diversity, and exhibit a spectacular variety of body forms, including lineages that range from deep-bodied (e.g. moonfish, spadefish), elongate (e.g. eels, needlefish), laterally compressed (e.g. ribbonfish) to globular (e.g. pufferfish), plus the uniquely shaped seahorses, flatfishes and ocean sunfishes. The purpose of this research is to tease-apart the major interacting factors influencing the evolution of body form at the macroevolutionary scale, across teleost fishes, and to identify trends in shape diversity over their evolutionary history. As members of the ‘FishShapes’ team students will spend at least 2 semesters conducting research: collecting data and working together to develop and test a hypothesis concerning the evolution of body shape across fishes. The ultimate goal is to write and publish a scientific paper. This project is ideally suited to students who have no prior research experience, as we will cover everything from how to develop hypotheses through to giving scientific presentations.

Team Leaders
Samantha Price Biological Sciences
Olivier Larouche Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Benton, B., *Kessler, B., *Mcglinn, C., *Gross, D., *Price, S., *Larouche, O. (2019, April). Habitat complexity influences locomotor morphologies in teleost fishes. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of ScienceG
1314

Collaborative biomedical engineering design between Clemson and Arusha Technical College

Developing countries face healthcare challenges every day, whether it is lack of supplies or a shortage of healthcare professionals. Medical devices and equipment that are considered standard in hospitals in the United States can be hard to find and very expensive in developing countries, such as Tanzania. In addition there is a shortage of trained biomedical engineers. Therefore, the goal of this Creative Inquiry team is to design and develop medical instrumentation and monitors that are robust, user-friendly, and low-cost for Tanzania in collaboration with engineering students and faculty at Arusha Technical College in Tanzania. The students on this team will be expected to work on electronics and instrument design.  They are expected to do needs finding to find the issues facing biomedical engineers in rural SC and in Tanzania. The students will collaborate weekly with students from Arusha Technical College through message boards. In addition, the Clemson and ATC student teams will have joint videoconferenced update meetings once a month with faculty and staff from both institutions. In addition to doing design, Clemson students are expected to learn about Tanzania. Students will learn about Tanzanian culture, government and healthcare structure. In addition, students will learn some basic conversational Swahili.

Team Leaders
Delphine Dean Bioengineering
John D DesJardins Bioengineering
Melissa McCullough Bioengineering
William Richardson Bioengineering
Accomplishments
*Banaszak, B., *Blasko, M., *Conner, K., *Falconer, R., *Hatchett, M., *Houk, E., *Hummel, C., *Jenkins, L., *Kolf, K., *LeMatty, A., *Mandilwar, S., *Mcleod, D., *Meilinger, N., *Moen, R., *Nigoa, D., *Nukovic, A., *Peer, H., *Tan, S., *Ward, S., Dean, D., DesJardins, J., *McCullough, M., *Richardson, W. (2019, April). Low Resource Medical Device Design - Clemson-Arusha Collaboration. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1316

Hellbender Ecology

Hellbenders (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis) are large, long-lived amphibians that live their entire lives in rivers and streams throughout the Appalachian mountains.  As part of this project, students will assist graduate students with hellbender surveys and monitoring of artificial nest boxes that have been deployed in streams to provide suitable habitat.  Additionally, students will work as a team to develop and implement a research project to compare water quality parameters inside and outside of nest boxes. 

Team Leaders
Lauren Diaz Forestry & Environment Conserv
Cathy Jachowski Forestry & Environment Conserv
Accomplishments
*Malone, H., *Mcdaniel, E., Diaz, L., Jachowski, C. (2019, April). A Comparison of Water Quality Parameters in Artificial and Natural Habitat of the Eastern Hellbender . Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1317

Creating Simulation in Didactics to Promote Active Learning for Undergraduate Students

The purpose of this Creative Inquiry is to create a community where undergraduate students can share their ideas, identify effective low-fidelity simulation strategies, and create engaging simulation pedagogies for didactic undergraduate nursing education.

Team Leaders
Lena Burgess School of Nursing
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1318

NASA Micro-g NExT

This Creative Inquiry is focused on applying to NASA's Micro-g NExT Program. Teams of undergraduate students from multiple majors will be challenged with creating a device to aid in space exploration missions defined by requirements outlined by NASA. Student teams, if selected, will have the opportunity to travel to Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX to test their devices in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory. 

Team Leaders
Joshua Summers Mechanical Engineering
Nicholas Spivey Mechanical Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1320

Industrial Assessments: Energy and resource efficiency audits

This project is dedicated to training students to help with Clemson's Industrial Assessment Center Students will learn how to conduct energy audits around campus and will analyze potential efficiency projects. Students will work in teams to identify, plan, implement, and then monitor energy efficiency projects. They will then also track related sustainability metrics such as energy and greenhouse gas emission savings. Students should expect to enroll in this project for at least 2 semesters.

Team Leaders
Michael Dale Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
David Ladner Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
Phillip Litherland Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
Chakara Rajan Madhusudanan Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
Sandra Eksioglu Industrial Engineering
Elizabeth R. Carraway Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1321

Bioprinting

When hosted in the proper fluid medium, cells can be loaded into ink jet printer heads and printed in three-dimensional structures.  The ultimate goal of this technology, called “cell printing” is to print organs that can be used as replacements for diseased or damaged organs.  While this goal is still far in the future, cell printing currently has several applications, including rapid drug testing, bioprinting of skin grafts for promoting wound healing, and bioprinting of bone and cartilage.  One problem inhibiting further development of bioprinting concerns the control over droplet formation for existing printheads.  Ideally one would like to have control over the drop diameter and number of cells per drop in a fixed printhead.  However, any given printhead typically is capable of forming a narrow range of drop diameters.  It is possible that, for viscoelastic fluids, there is a greater possibility to control the characteristics of drops than is the case for fluids that have little or no elasticity.  This idea is the focus of this project.  

Team Leaders
Joshua Bostwick Mechanical Engineering
John R Saylor Mechanical Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1337

Combining Big Data with Live-Cell Imaging for Automatic Image Analysis

Humans can easily identify cellular features such as nucleus and cytoplasm from phase contrast images of cells, but computers still struggle. This project will combine computer vision algorithms based on deep learning with big data sets generated in the wet lab here using high-throughput live-cell imaging apparati. The goal is to make computers better at automatically identifying cell features from phase contrast images, or to identify cell types from such images. 

Team Leaders
Marc Birtwistle Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1322

Aging and Decision-Making

Decision-making is a prevalent part of everyday life, and the choices we make can have significant consequences across all stages of the lifespan. The purpose of this CI Team is to examine adaptive and maladaptive decision-making strategies that occur with healthy aging.  This research seeks to assess how social, cognitive, emotional, and motivational factors influence decision-making.  Understanding these factors may allow us to develop decision aids that can improve decision-making outcomes with age. 

Team Leaders
Kaileigh Byrne Psychology
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1331

Horse Play

Hippotherapy, also known as equine assisted therapy, is the use of a horse as a moving platform for rehabilitation treatment for a range of disabilities. Literature has shown positive improvements in patients with spinal cord injuries, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and many other disabilities when partaking in hippotherapy. This information will be used to create saddles for effective use in hippotherapy. Adaptive saddles will be created to provide assistance to those of specific disabilities whom normally cannot ride without assistance or minimal intervention. The saddle will be suited with pressure sensor feedback in order to obtain rider patterns within the saddle. Further modifications to gather rider actions while mounted on the horse can also be explored.

Team Leaders
Anne Marie Holter Bioengineering
John D DesJardins Bioengineering
Kristine Vernon Animal & Veterinary Sciences
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1328

Simplifying Virtual Environment Population through 3D Scan Implementation

The Clemson Immersive Space aims to make virtual reality technology and virtual environments accessible to all students across Clemson’s campus. This project aims to reduce the need for students to be familiar with 3D modeling software in order to create models for use in VR. Students will assist in researching and implementing 3D scanning in the Immersive Space using the Intel Realsense cameras.

Team Leaders
Oyewole Oyekoya CCIT CITI
Thomas Birdsong Electrical & Computer Engr
1330

Designing With Docs

In bioengineering, the opportunity to collaborate with clinicians in the design of biomedical devices is considered the highlight of any design experience, but usually these design experiences are limited to senior year, if at all. Clinicians are an essential contributor to the design process, in that they are both the users of biomedical devices, and often the first point of contact for problems that occur in their use. Typically, students explore design related issues, and recruit clinicians to support their work. In this new CI, clinical collaborators that have the support of their clinical innovation departments will work with students to create the next generation of biomedical devices.  This CI will be open to all undergraduates, and projects will be multi-semester, to support the development of long-term innovations in healthcare.

Team Leaders
Jordon Gilmore Bioengineering
John D DesJardins Bioengineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1332

Using STEAM to Connect Current Tigers with Future Tigers

This project will explore the very real task of transferring college-level engineering projects into a level-appropriate conceptualization for the current state standards for a middle school class. Students from Engineering and Education majors will collaborate in the development of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics) projects and curriculum that use fun, hands-on approaches to demonstrate engineering related topics to 6th grade students. The projects they create will be used to help establish an off-campus STEAM Lab in Pickens County. Clemson students are expected showcase their projects at the end of the semester by working alongside and educating their younger peers on engineering topics utilizing the curriculum that they developed. This Creative Inquiry project will set precedent for a project of a much larger initiative supported by the CFO and Office of the Provost. The partnership between community and university as well as the off campus STEAM Lab that is developed by this creative inquiry will serve as model to be studied, analyzed, and eventually implemented in an area of South Carolina known as the Corridor of Shame, due to its underperforming and underfunded school districts. 

Team Leaders
Jeremy King Physics and Astronomy
Abigail Holcombe Academic Success Center
Devin Keck Mechanical Engineering
Accomplishments
Clemson Newstand, Extending STEAM: Clemson student researchers developing STEAM workshop model
College of ScienceG
1333

AI for Racecars

Through hands-on experience, students will learn the new frontier of autonomous vehicle control based on deep reinforcement learning, and also fundamentals of vehicle dynamics; data acquisition and analytics skills etc. Specifically for the upcoming semester, students will have opportunity to work on a fully-autonomous 18th scale race car finishing racing on a track (Amazon AWS DeepRacer) and a FPV robot car that can be readily used as development platform for Python and computer vision learning (DJI Robomaster S1). Students will gain experience in deep learning and end-to-end training for autonomous vehicles. Students should expect to enroll in this CI project for 2-4 semesters. The courses to be enrolled will be ME 3900/4900, section number to be announced. Students are expected to meet weekly to report progress and plan for next steps. Students in their Junior and Senior years are encouraged to apply.Estimated length of the proposed project is 2 semesters for a single project period per academic year. The design project can be renewed each academic year with a new competition entry.

Team Leaders
Yiqiang Han Mechanical Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1335

Autonomous Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAV)

Electric-powered Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) technologies are around the corner and ready to be applied to commercial applications, such as unmanned delivery, emergency response, survey and patrolling, etc. Autonomous control of an Unmanned Air Vehicle for a package delivery mission is specifically considered in this project. Students will have to carry out their unique design that achieve a balance between size and payload, while still capable of autonomous navigation without external interference (100% edge computing). The current project involves using state of the art development tools such as NVIDIA Jetson TX2 GPU board, ROS robotics simulation environment, PX4 autopilot platform. The objective of this project is to design, simulate and test a UAV to perform package delivery mission solely based on vision navigation and autonomous control algorithms. Students will also gain insight of the vehicle autonomy through hands-on programming and testing practices that can be applied to other interdisciplinary projects such as self-driving car researches. Students are expected to meet weekly to report progress and plan for next steps. Students should expect to enroll in the CI project for 2-4 semesters.Estimated length of the proposed project is 4-6 semesters. Multi-semester commitment is expected from the enrolled students.

Team Leaders
Yiqiang Han Mechanical Engineering
Accomplishments
*Han, Y., Hao, W., *Nicholson, D., *Krolicki, A., *Wang, T., *Nasser, J., *Powers, N., *Ballard, J., *Do, P., *Sheets, S., *Nuttall, M., *Patel, D., *Witebsky, N., *Lee, J., *Gantenbein, C. (2019, April). Autonomous MAV Package Delivery for Urban Last Mile Project and Artificial Intelligence for Racecar project. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1336

Psychology of Religion and Spirituality

Team members have opportunities to work on several major projects related to religion and/or spirituality, under the supervision of Dr. Job Chen. In broad terms, we study attitudes and behaviors influenced by religious beliefs and/or spiritual experiences. We use a mixed methods including psychological measures (e.g., survey), experimental manipulation, and qualitative interviews. The CI team has several ongoing projects for students to conduct psychological research in topics related to religion and spirituality. Motivated students are also encouraged to explore their own interest and the CI team will support their endeavor.  Through these researches, students will gain experience in empirical, social scientific research methods, and may have opportunity at conference presentation and authorship on peer-reviewed publications. 

Team Leaders
Zhuo Job Chen Psychology
Randle Aaron Villanueva
Accomplishments
*Black, D., *Brooke, E., *Gouge, C., *Jackson, M., *Kao, E., *Koch, H., *Merics, N., *Myers, L., *Patel, J., *Word, F., *Chen, Z., *Villanueva, R. (2019, April). Psychology of Religion and Spirituality. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1339

Hands on Water for Agriculture

Contamination of water resources is a growing concern. One of the leading contributors to this rising problem is the agriculture industry, that both needs the water for production but also frequently causes water quality impairments. This CI will focus on experimentally assessing options for physical, chemical, and biological remediation of agricultural runoff in an effort to treat water and promote water recycling programs. Students will be able to assess and use appropriate field and laboratory techniques to determine water quality and respond to water quality concerns using chemical, physical, and biological treatment options.

Team Leaders
Lauren Garcia Chance Plant & Environmental Sciences
Natasha Bell Plant & Environmental Sciences
Sarah White Plant & Environmental Sciences
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1443

Autonomous Vehicles and Users with Disabilities

Persons with certain motor or cognitive disabilities like paralysis of the extremities or autism may face significant obstacles to gainful employment and social inclusion due to difficulties in operating conventional motor vehicles. Proponents of fully autonomous or “self-driving” vehicles argue that the emergence of this technology may address this issue. Advocates for disabled persons are concerned, however, that the needs of persons with disabilities are not being adequately considered in the design of this technology.  As a result, it is argued, self-driving technologies are being developed that will ultimately prove inaccessible to persons with a range of disabilities, ultimately undermining the potential mobility benefits of the technology. There is, therefore, a critical need to determine a model of interaction that will support efficient use of this technology by persons with disabilities. The proposed research is being initiated to determine the needs, preferences, and concerns of persons with motor, cognitive and other disabilities in interacting with self-driving vehicles, a model of interaction incorporating context-specific methodologies and the development of tools to support accessible interaction.

Team Leaders
Julian Brinkley School of Computing
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1340

Studying Barred Owls in an Urban to Forest Landscape Gradient

Although Barred Owls are widely described as forest interior dwelling species associated with old growth forest, some studies have also found that this species can inhabit urban settings provided some key habitat features remain. In these studies, owls readily bred and roosted in large, mature trees residual in older suburban neighborhoods. Aside from these studies, the ability of Barred Owls to reside and breed successfully in urban settings has not been well described. We plan to study how barred owls are using urban areas in the Piedmont region of South Carolina. Clemson University is an ideal region for this study because the university campus retains large mature trees, and the surrounding Clemson Experimental Forest offers the opportunity to study owl habitat and ecology on a continuous scale from urban to forest habitat. This study will describe the habitat thresholds associated with the occupancy of barred owls, and the differences between the home ranges and resource selections of owls residing in forests versus suburban habitats.

Team Leaders
Marion Clement Forestry & Environment Conserv
Russell Kyle Barrett Forestry & Environment Conserv
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1646

Improving the Automotive Hail Damage Claim Process Using 3D Scanner Technology

Ally Bank and Clemson University have identified a common interest in forming a CI project to investigate solutions to assessing large numbers of hail-damaged vehicles more effectively and efficiently than current evaluation systems are able to do. This CI will provide students with the opportunity to work on a real-life problem, and to develop techniques for evaluating the feasibility of a 3D scanning solution to rapidly inspect hail damage with user-friendly techniques, with the ultimate goal of potentially processing claims more quickly yielding a higher rate of customer satisfaction and policy renewal.

Team Leaders
Rachel Anderson Academic Success Center
Todd Schweisinger Mechanical Engineering
1343

Modulating Nanoparticle Shape to Enhance Blood-Brain Barrier Delivery

The presence of the blood-brain barrier dramatically hinders neurologic treatments, with >98% of small molecule drugs unable to enter the brain. Modern medical attempts to deliver drugs into the brain have involved disruption of the barrier, exploitation of different routes of administration, and attachment of ligands on nanoparticle surfaces that are specific to cellular receptors at the blood-brain barrier. These methods have had limited success in translation to clinical applications. The modulation of nanoparticle shape has been shown to have a large impact on nanoparticle transport, thermodynamic stability, and cellular internalization. However, the effect of different nanoparticle shapes on brain uptake has not been extensively explored. Team members in the Modulating Nanoparticle Shape to Enhance Blood-Brain Barrier Delivery creative inquiry will engage in the creation of polymer-based nanoparticles of various shapes to improve blood-brain barrier delivery. CI students will have the opportunity to work in an interdisciplinary research environment, using engineering, biology, and nanotechnology related concepts towards solving a major medical problem.

Team Leaders
Jessica Larsen Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Accomplishments
*Edgecomb, S., *Rovero, C., Larsen, J. (2019, April). Encapsulation and Delivery of Cas9 in Polymeric Nanoparticles. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Suescum, C., *L’Amoreaux, N., *Ali, A., *Crum, C. & Kelly, J.M. (2018 April 6-7) “Post-Assembly Manipulation of Polymersome Morphology.” Presented at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Southeastern Regional Conference, Baton Rouge, LA.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1344

Image-Guided Drug Delivery To the Brain

Advances in nanotechnology have led to the development of nanoparticles that can deliver therapeutics into specific cells for the treatment of many cancers, including gliomas. Clinical translation of these therapies to patients has been limited due to inefficient efficacy in vivo.  Image-guided drug delivery may help overcome barriers to translation providing quantitative analysis of biodistribution and pharmacokinetics through real-time visual monitoring of the therapeutic within the body,. Computed tomography (CT) is a desirable imaging method for brain disease diagnosis, as it can provide information on the location of bones, muscles, fat, and organs. However, CT can require long-term exposure to radiative contrast agents in order to obtain high quality image information. The high doses required are not currently approved by the FDA. Because of this, we are proposing the creation of a nanoparticle system capable of delivering FDA approved contrast agents directly to the site of interest, limiting toxicity associated with whole body exposure and off-targeting. Due to their small size, nanoparticles have the ability to load a high concentration of drug while simultaneously being targeted to specific areas of the brain, which would provide a dramatic improvement to current CT capabilities.

Team Leaders
Angela Alexander Bioengineering
Jessica Larsen Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Accomplishments
*Beitz, A., *Martin, C., *Scammon, B., *Nguyen, H., *Tatem, L., *Dorsey, R., Kelly, J. & Alexander-Bryant, A. (2018, April 6-7) “Advancing Computed Tomography Imaging in the Brain through Nanoparticle Contrast Agents,” Presented at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) 2018 Southern Student Regional Conference, Baton Rouge, LA.
*Beitz, A., *Martin, C., *Scammon, B., *Nguyen, H., *Tatem, L., *Dorsey, R., Kelly, J. & Alexander-Bryant, A. (2018, April 11-14) “Advancing Computed Tomography Imaging in the Brain through Nanoparticle Contrast Agents.” Presented at the Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1616

Diversity Outreach in Bioengineering

We aim to improve retention and matriculation of students of color into bioengineering by building their identity as engineers. Targeting incoming freshman, this CI will function as a diverse cohort of minority students enrolled in bioengineering. We will connect underrepresented upper classmen and grad students with the freshmen as they work together on a multidisciplinary engineering project. The potential being that underrepresented students can build a community of fellow bioengineers for support and fellowship that will aid in developing their identify as engineers early in their college careers. In the second year, students will design their own hypothesis based study based on their foundational year of research on the team. In addition, they will use their project to outreach to new general engineering students and K-12 students in our state.

Team Leaders
Angela Alexander Bioengineering
Melinda Harman Bioengineering
Jordon Gilmore Bioengineering
Maria McCoy Bioengineering
Melissa McCullough Bioengineering
Delphine Dean Bioengineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1445

Clemson Football Recruiting Mailer Design

We have partnered with the Clemson Football Recruiting Office to help design a mailer to send to potential Clemson Football recruits. This  multidisciplinary team will meet to brainstorm, design and prototype a personalized 3D mailer that the recruiting office can send to high school football players in the recruiting process. The mailer is intended to promote Clemson Football and get the student excited about the possibility of being on the team. This is an incredible opportunity for students to have a direct impact on Clemson Football and potential incoming players.

Team Leaders
Haley Ellis Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1345

Renaissance MAN: Men of Color and Social Action

Renaissance Male Achievement Network (Renaissance MAN) is an initiative that provides academic enrichment, social engagement, personal development and professional preparation to men of color. Participants of Renaissance MAN will engage in this Creative Inquiry beginning the spring semester of their second year. This CI focuses on exploring the role of racial identity, masculinity and leadership philosophy in addressing social issues. Participants will ultimately develop and implement a plan to address a social issue. 

Team Leaders
DeOnte Brown New Student & Family Programs
1349

IBM Watson in the Watt

We are recruiting the brightest and most creative and ambitious students from all disciplines into the world of artificial intelligence (AI).  The IBM Watson in the Watt team, sponsored by IBM, brings the world renown AI technology "Watson" to Clemson, with a mission to broadly explore AI's use in broad disciplines.   We welcome creative students from any disciplines that are interested in "answering questions" with the power of a wealth of data.  The team will learn about:* What is Watson* How to use Watson to answer questions* How to train Watson to be expert of your discipline, by feeding it the right data - lots of itWe emphasize that students from all disciplines are welcome - but we anticipate the brightest to make it to this highly selective team.  We are NOT ONLY looking for computing disciplines - rather, we HIGHLY WELCOME students from non-computing disciplines but have a creative mind and a keen sense of data (any kind).  Once selected, students on the team will become Clemson's Watson pioneers.  We will go out to work with a number of potential professors who have "cool" questions hoping to use Watson to help answer.Currently, we have professors offering Watson challenges in digital humanities, digital history, healthcare, precision agriculture, and Internet of Things.  The list of challenges keeps growing.Being on the team means you are among the selected few at Clemson that will be pioneering the Watson technology.  You may interact with IBM experts on Watson.  The team will be on IBM's radar for bright students for potential internships.

Team Leaders
Dane Smith Watt Family Innovation Center
Kuang-Ching Wang Electrical & Computer Engr
1418

Vehicle Dynamics Characterization

This team will study vehicle dynamics of a trailer traveling over the road and how these characteristics will alter a packaged unitized load.  In addition, the team will alter aspects of the trailer such as wheel imbalance, vehicle loading and vehicle speeds have on the packaged product.  To study this, a multi-axis vibration data acquisition system will be used to record the tri-axial accelerations as well as the rotational axis

Team Leaders
Gregory Batt Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
Gregory Cocchiola Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
Accomplishments
*Ferreira, D., *Cocchiola, G., *Mclamb, M., *Nielson, R. (2019, April). Vehicle Dynamics Characterization. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1351

Rocket Club Leadership

Clemson University Rocket Engineering (CURE) is a team who's main objective is to design and fabricate a high powered rocket to enter into the annual Spaceport America Cup, an international intercollegiate experimental sounding rocket competition. Throughout the year, members of the team will separate into various flight critical teams including flight dynamics, structural design, payload and recovery, avionics, and manufacturing. The rocket will be designed with various height, weight, and apogee constraints based on the competition category rules.

Team Leaders
Phanindra Tallapragada Mechanical Engineering
Daniel B Fant Mechanical Engineering
Garrett Pataky Mechanical Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1428

Something Very Fishy

Something Very Fishy is a musical theater production paired with a hands-on marine science exhibit for elementary school children. This collaboration between Kathy Prosser (Educational Entertainment LLC) and Michael Childress (Biological Sciences) will bring to together local elementary school classes with Clemson student volunteers in a unique arts and sciences (STEAM) outreach program with a focus on marine conservation and our changing climate. Members of this creative inquiry team will develop and present hands-on marine science exhibits to enhance the experience of children attending this musical theater adventure following lives of a young marine biologist and a local fisherman who must set aside their differences to work together to save their local marine animals. Members of this creative inquiry team will develop hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, grade-specific experiments, class resources for teachers, and activities in support of the general theme of marine conservation. Team members will also care for and exhibit live marine animals in portable touch tanks, demonstrate the use of cameras and diving gear used by marine scientists, and lead students through basic experiments demonstrating the importance of water quality. Photo backdrops, reusable bag coloring stations, and continuous videos of underwater exploration will give the participating children an immersion experience like no other. CI team members will also have an opportunity to learn about ongoing marine science research through their partnership with the Conservation of Marine Resources and Marine Ecology creative inquiry teams. This will include reading and discussing the current marine conservation literature and assisting in the analysis of field data. Team members will also be expected to create a digital poster and promotional video about the Something Very Fishy production for use in advertising and promotion of future productions. By bringing together education, biology and environmental science majors with local artists and performers, this promises to be an enriching experience for everyone.

Team Leaders
Michael Childress Biological Sciences
Kylie Smith Biological Sciences
Kara Noonan Biological Sciences
Accomplishments
*Alikhail, S., *Arango, K., *Blake, A., *Braffitt, K., *Branan, E., *Corell, J., *Cousart, A., *Fisher, K., *Fox, D., *Gentry, C., *Gleaton, E., *Gower, J., *Greene, L., *Haeffner, N., *Hays, K., *Holt, C., *Isbell, K., *Iwan, M., *Johnson, K., *Johnson, H., *Joines, A., *Kinard, L., *Logan, M., *Lott, A., *Lutz, J., *Momin, M., *Parker, M., *Powell, E., *Radick, R., *Saverance, M., *Shah, M., *Smith, C., *Stroud, M., *Young, T., Childress, M., *Noonan, K., Smith, K. (2019, April). There is Something Very Fishy Going On . Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of ScienceG
1574

Servant Leadership Abroad

Servant leadership is an essential concept for future business leaders to acknowledge; it considers how an organization affects the growth and well-being of the people in the local community. This Creative Inquiry project will explore crucial business issues that affect Puerto Rico in the wake of a major hurricane through the lens of what it means to be a servant leader. The research topic for this year is the global logistics of humanitarian aid and we will work with Samaritan’s Feet, a non-profit organization based out of Charlotte, N.C., called to identify an issue pertinent to their operations. Samaritan’s Feet serves underprivileged children worldwide by providing them with a pair of new shoes and words of hope for future opportunities. During this project, students will have to identify, collect, and analyze the data necessary to address the issue identified, and propose an innovative solution or operational improvement which they will present to the managers and other stakeholders of Samaritan’s Feet. This CI will require travel to Puerto Rico during Spring Break 2020 to examine first-hand the on-the-ground operations of a Samaritan’s Feet mission trip. The location of the travel portion may change each year depending upon the needs of the organization and communities abroad.

Team Leaders
Gabriela Peschiera Office of Student Enrichment
Janis L Miller Management
College of BusinessD
1490

Disaster Relief Supply Chain

One of the immediate needs following a disaster such as a devastating hurricane is housing. This proposed research project aims to examine the effectiveness of novel modular housing design solutions that utilize sustainable and renewable material such as wood by integrating them into a reliable and flexible logistics system for disaster relief operations. The other two major construction materials, namely, concrete and steel are approximately 5 and 12 times heavier than wood. Also, we often do not have access to heavy machinery immediately after a disaster. Thus, the light weight nature of wood is more suited for disaster housing. We will investigate practical logistics issues for utilizing modular housing in the event of a disaster. Specifically, we will investigate (i) how to pre-position recovery assets and housing construction materials ahead of a disaster, (ii) how to deliver, assemble and deploy these assets in a variety of likely disaster scenarios – possibly leveraging limited manufacturing and infrastructure capacities, and (iii) how to transition the temporary structures into long-term residence after the disaster. The goal is to establish and implement a mathematical model that optimizes strategic (here and now) decisions, while planning for potential tactical decisions during the preparation stage for an upcoming disaster based on short-term forecasts as well as operational decisions that will need to be executed during and immediately after a disaster.

Team Leaders
Burak Eksioglu Industrial Engineering
Yongjia Song Industrial Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1432

Human Artificial Chromosomes as a Platform for Multiplexed Expression of CRISPR-Based Genetic Recording System

Synthetic biology is moving towards the engineering of entire genetic circuits, but, at present, delivering and hosting the large number of genes necessary for such engineering is difficult, and current methods of doing so have severe limitations. This project aims to develop human artificial chromosomes (HACs) as a technology for hosting and expressing multiple genes episomally in order to learn more about biological systems. On this project, students will work closely with a graduate student and, once trained, assist directly with running experiments.

Team Leaders
Marc Birtwistle Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Mark Blenner Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Charles Wang
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1491

Health, Well-Being, and Meaning

In broad terms, we study psychological well-being in various contexts, such as built environment, religious beliefs, and clinical settings. We use mixed methods including psychological measures (e.g., survey), experimental manipulation, and qualitative interviews.  The CI team has several ongoing projects for students to conduct psychological research in topics related to health and well-being. Motivated students are also encouraged to explore their own interest and the CI team will support their endeavor. 

Team Leaders
Zhuo Job Chen Psychology
Randle Aaron Villanueva
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1356

Analysis of Packaging used for Home Delivery Meals Analysis, Food Safety and Sustainability

Literature research performed in Fall 2017 indicated that Home Delivered Meal Kits such as Hello Fresh and Blue Apron may have food safety issues.  Meal kits that may sit at a home owners door for 2 or more hours can be at risk for temperature abuse which can lead to microbial growth at levels that can cause food safety concerns.  In addition, vague cooking instructions may lead to undercooked food that can cause additional problems.  Other concerns are that amount of packaging used in Meal Kits could be excessive and without proper instruction regarding how to dispose of the waste material, could lead to increased solid waste problems.  The main objectives are 1-Evaluate the temperature profile of different home delivered packaged meal kits for perishable products; 2 - Examine overall microbial population of selected food components within the packaged meal kits. ·       Measure selected physical properties of primary and secondary packaging materials used in home delivered meal kits. 3 - Audit the type of packaging and amount of packaging to provide a sustainability score for each meal kit. 4-Use information gathered to determine if packaging used by packaged home delivered meal kits are packaged for optimal shelf life and make recommendations to improve packaging where appropriate. 

Team Leaders
Kay Cooksey Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1363

Culture and Interpersonal Relations

This project investigates the influence of cultural background and values on interpersonal relations. In particular, it examines how targets with different cultural backgrounds respond to a potentially offensive situation (e.g., mistreatment, incivility), how the offender behaves afterwards (e.g., apology), and how this process influences the relationship.

Team Leaders
Ceren Gunsoy Psychology
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1371

High-performance Cluster Computing

Parallel computing is often a topic covered until the senior year for undergrads. Moreover, large-scale computing is becoming fundamental tool to researchers in many fields of science and engineering (e.g., business, chemistry, physics, biology). This CI is dedicated to opening up parallel computing to all levels of undergrads in relevant fields of computational science and engineering. Through this CI, we explore how high-performance computing (HPC) systems impact various disciplines, how HPC systems are constructed, what it takes to program parallel applications, how to run parallel applications on a HPC system, and how to optimize applications.This CI is intended to introduce undergraduate students from various STEM disciplines to parallel computing early in their undergraduate experience. Skills and knowledge gained though hands on activities, research, and trainings will prepare students for undergraduate research, provide skills to help students stand out and succeed in graduate school, and provide students an opportunity to test their skills against teams from all over the world at the annual Supercomputing Conference's Student Cluster Competition.Each year the annual competition's scientific domain changes (e.g, geophysics, bioinformatics, molecular dynamics, hydrology, climate); therefore, this CI is open to STEM majors who can serve as domain scientists to help interpret scientific results produced by the HPC applications.

Team Leaders
Jon Calhoun Electrical & Computer Engr
Accomplishments
*Van Scyoc, A., *Hollowell, J., *Broadhead, G., *Dube, G., *Heitzeg, N., *Holden, N., *Mcknight, C., Faykus, M., *Placke, S., Calhoun, J. (2019, April). High-Performance Cluster Computing: Engaging Young Scientists and Engineering in the 21st Century Laboratory.. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1369

Statistical and mathematical models in weather forecast

This is an interdisciplinary project in which students will gain access to both statistics and mathematics. The students will record temperatures in certain regions and try to use statistical models to find seasonal patterns in the recorded numbers. The patterns and numbers are used to forecast weather in the future. Students will then use computer software to analyze the prediction errors. Students will also perform similar activities in the context of number theory.

Team Leaders
Jun Luo Mathematical Sciences
Hui Xue Mathematical Sciences
College of ScienceG
1370

LEAD Forward

The purpose of LEAD Forward is to prepare CECAS undergraduates to be principled leaders of excellence in their professional and personal endeavors.

Team Leaders
Steve Sanders Civil Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1372

Entrepreneurship in Behavioral, Social and Health Sciences

Entrepreneurship in Behavioral, Social and Health Sciences will focus on introducing students to the foundations of entrepreneurship. In addition, students will have the opportunity to be a part of a small group mentored by faculty on an entrepreneur-focused project of their choosing allowing them to apply foundational knowledge of entrepreneurship.

Team Leaders
Shontavia Johnson Provost & VP for Ac Aff
Denise Anderson Parks Recreation & Tourism Mgt
1376

Visual STEM Communication

This CI will create a student-driven collaborative community bringing together students from across the university to create engaging and effective STEM communication projects. Learn to make videos, animations, illustrations, infographics, and presentation decks that are scientifically accurate, grounded in effective design, and leverage proven STEM communication strategies. Our team leaders represent three different colleges at Clemson (Business, CBSHS, and CECAS), and we encourage all students to join us in a truly interdisciplinary experience!

Team Leaders
Erica Black Graphic Communications
Kelly Lazar Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
Meghnaa Tallapragada Communications Studies
College of BusinessD
1380

Ground-based Support for the NASA Juno Mission

The NASA mission to study Jupiter is supported by telescope observations on Earth that put the scientific return of each Jupiter flyby into broader context. For example, the NASA IRTF telescope is regularly used to record high resolution spectra of the planet. Data analysis can be a time-consuming process that is limited by current software. This project is to work as team to develop, test, and automate software that will process spectra of the atmosphere of Jupiter. Members of the team will include students that are interested in optics and instrumentation, astrophysical data analysis, software development, and planetary atmospheres.

Team Leaders
Mate Adamkovics Physics and Astronomy
College of ScienceG
1378

Efficacy of Virtual Reality for Operative Pain and Anxiety Management

Research demonstrates that ten percent of the population becomes addicted to opioids from exposure to narcotics in the operative setting. The abuse and addiction from these drugs have now placed the US in the center of an “opioid epidemic”. As a result, a variety of programs and interventions are being explored to treat the pain associated with surgery while minimizing or eliminating the need for opioids. One such “alternative” treatment for pain involves the use of virtual reality (VR) as a primary or adjunct technique. We will achieve this goal by RELIEVE (viRtual rEaLity IntErVEntion), a virtual reality pain management intervention scheme.

Team Leaders
Laura Stanley Industrial Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1379

Dinosaurs to Birds: Ontogeny and morphogenesis

The long- to short-tailed avian dinosaurs transition occurred 125 Mya. The tail underwent considerable morphological change, from the long, reptilian-like ancestral condition to the short, distally fused tail of Pygostylian birds. We are interested in the developmental and genetic changes that occurred to bring about this morphological adaptation in the tail and the fusion of the synsacral vertebrae. Understanding these processes will provide insight into vertebrate morphogenesis and the basis of morphological adaptation.

Team Leaders
Susan Chapman Biological Sciences
College of ScienceG
1560

Food Waste Recovery Initiative

The Clemson Food Waste Recovery Initiative (FWRI) is a collaborative outreach campaign that seeks the current life cycle of food waste on campus. Where is it going now? What is being done with it? How can it be improved? How does the Clemson University model reflect the EPA's Food Recovery Hierarchy? A guide that prioritizes actions that prevent or divert food waste from landfills and brings together ambassadors from the public and private sectors dedicated to sharing knowledge, coordinating resources and working together to reduce food waste in South Carolina. Virtually anyone can take part in reducing food waste.       

Team Leaders
David Vandeventer Univ Fac:Custodial-Recycle Svs
Dustin Wills Sonoco Inst Pkg Design & Graph
Thomas Jones Univ Fac:Custodial-Recycle Svs
1381

Sugar High? How do different sugars and sugar substitutes in soft drinks impact the oral microbiome?

Dental cavities are a major health problem worldwide. To better understand what causes tooth decay, we need to examine the microbes living on our teeth. This community of microbes are known as the oral microbiome. The bacteria that live on our teeth form a biofilm commonly known as dental plaque. The microbes in the tooth biofilm survive by feeding on sugars and starches consumed in our diets. After feeding on these sugars many of the waste products expelled by bacteria are acidic, causing tooth enamel erosion, and eventually, tooth decay. The goal of our research will be to compare how different soda types influence the oral microbiota. Students involved in this CI will conduct genomic and microbiological research on the oral microbiome. Student’s will complete DNA/RNA extractions of plaque biofilms, complete PCR amplifications, prepare samples for DNA/RNA sequencing, and will learn how to use Next Generation DNA sequencing technology. Student’s should expect to enroll for at least 2-4 semesters. 

Team Leaders
Vincent Richards Biological Sciences
Lauren O'Connell Biological Sciences
College of ScienceG
1406

Design for All Abilities

There are many individuals with physical and/or cognitive disabilities in the world, but their needs are often overlooked in the design of everyday things. This project will guide students through research on principles of universal design, identification of a project with a local impact, and development of prototype solutions to improve the accessibility and utility of the Clemson campus. Students will participate in activities that allow them to gain first-hand experience with some of the challenges individuals with disabilities face on a daily basis.  This experience will enable students to empathize with people different from themselves, providing a unique design perspective and ability to think outside the box when developing solutions to meet the needs of a wide range of stakeholders.

Team Leaders
Matt Miller General Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1387

WOOD DUCK AND OTHER AVIAN USE AND PRODUCTION FROM ARTIFICIAL NEST BOXES IN THE CLEMSON EXPERIEMENTAL FOREST

Wood ducks are arguably the most important waterfowl species in South Carolina because it is consistently the most harvested.  Artificial nest boxes (i.e., wood duck boxes) have shown to boost local populations and thus, many states have a wood duck box program, including South Carolina.  A research goal of South Carolina Department of Natural Resources is to expand their wood duck box program.  In response we will begin a creative inquiry undergraduate project to monitor existing and erect new wood duck boxes in Clemson's Experimental Forest.  Students will be involved in all aspects of research including installation and monitoring of boxes, data collection and analysis, and drafting manuscripts and oral presentations.  These data will be melded into an ongoing artificial nest study by M.S. student, Gillie Croft, and will provide premiere data on the status of wood duck box use in the Upstate in and around Clemson University.          

Team Leaders
Nicholas Masto Forestry & Environment Conserv
Richard Kaminski Forestry & Environment Conserv
Accomplishments
*Singletary, D., *Schmidt, N., *Taylor, J., *McCall, J., *Rabon, G., *Dudley, M., *Gray, C., *Masto, N., *Kaminski, R. (2019, April). Wood duck use of and production in artificial nest boxes: Clemson University undergraduate research in Piedmont Region, South Carolina. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*Sharpe, C., *Leland, R., *Turner, T., *Eidson, J., *Farah, H., *Braswell, S., *Tolson, J., *Watson, C., *Masto, N., *Kaminski, R. (2019, April). Evaluation of a rake sampling method to estimate biomass of submersed aquatic vegetation in South Carolina managed coastal wetlands. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1388

Bioinformatics for Cancer Genomics

This Creative Inquiry project investigates the cellular events that occur in breast cancer.  Specifically we are focused on what directs a healthy cell to become a cancer cell.  Research suggests the early developmental pathways in the mammary gland are reactivated in some types of breast cancers.  In order to understand these developmental signals, we are comparing mammary gland gene expression in the pre-pubertal swine to the genes expressed in human breast cancer profiles.    Global collaborative collections of human tumor samples with matched normals are available in databases for research analysis, however this approach requires tools capable of analyzing extremely large data sets.  We will utilize a bioinformatics approach to investigate our research-based questions.  The field of bioinformatics is the intersection of biology, statistics, and computer science.  We will build networks to indicate similar gene expression patterns comparing our swine samples to the human database.  In addition to breast cancer, we will investigate other diseases including but not limited to colon, pancreas, prostate, and uterine cancer.   We will use open source software for the analysis of genes and intersecting networks.  Visual graphics will be created in order to illustrate gene expression patterns between the human cancers and swine mammary models.          The ideal students for this Creative Inquiry project are those interesting in combining animal science and human medicine fields.  Students will disseminate data at the university, state, regional, and national level.       

Team Leaders
Heather Dunn Animal & Veterinary Sciences
Accomplishments
*Carrel, S., *Lewis, P., *Oswalt, H., *Redmond, B., *Smith, S., *Stone, A., *Vaughan, G., Moss, M., Dunn, H. (2019, April). Evaluation of swine mammary glands: A model for development, cancer and environmental cues. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1390

History of the Clemson Child Development Center

This Creative Inquiry will research the history of the Clemson Child Development Center and create a multimodal presentation of findings for the 50th anniversary celebration of the center in the fall of 2019.  Research will be conducted through interviews with founders, past and present board members, past and present teachers and directors, and former students. 

Team Leaders
Jacquelynn Associate Malloy Teacher Education
College of EducationE
1393

Survey of Clemson Infrastructure

"Restore and Improve Urban Infrastructure" is one of the 14 Engineering Grand Challenges and this CI will explore what infrastructure is and it's role in our lives. Through a collaboration with Clemson University's Facilities, we will be conducting an inventory of the stormwater system to assist with University's MS4 program. This is great experience for students interested in Civil Engineering, Biosystems Engineering, or Environmental Engineering though all students are welcome.

Team Leaders
William Martin General Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1392

From Drones to 3D Printing Terrain Models

Students will investigate and explore novel workflows for processing imagery from drones into tangible 3D printed products which can be used for communication and visualization purposes. Students will exercise research and problem-solving skills as they identify the proper tools, software, processing methods, and workflows and communicate their results. The students will acquire in-demand, high-tech skills, and apply them directly to engineering, planning, or architectural projects and/or other applications of interest. Students will also acquire leadership skills as they help to grow a community of drone users across the campus who can guide, support, and advise their safe and legal operation through this project.

Team Leaders
Blake Lytle CCIT CITI
Michael Dale Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
Patricia Carbajales-Dale CCIT CITI
Xiang Li Student Services
1395

Informing Medical Device Design and Reprocessing through Human Factors Engineering and User Validation

Human factors engineering focuses on understanding how people interact with technology and studying how user interface design affects the interactions people have with technology. U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines identify human factors engineering as essential for maximizing the likelihood that new medical devices will be safe and effective for the intended users, uses and use environments. Therefore, incorporating human factors engineering into medical device design and product development can be a key factor for meeting regulatory standards and launching a successful product. The long-term goal of this Creative Inquiry is to introduce the tools and techniques used in human factors engineering and to apply those skills to medical device design. Students enrolled in this CI will interact with industry professionals and student team members to use human factors and usability testing to inform medical design decisions with a focus on how devices are used in their clinical settings and during their reprocessing. Students will conduct the testing on commonly used medical devices and medical device prototypes and use hypothesis-driven research for improving upon medical device designs. Undergraduate students looking to join this team should expect to be involved for 2-4 semesters. 

Team Leaders
Zachary Hargett Bioengineering
Delphine Dean Bioengineering
Melinda Harman Bioengineering
John D DesJardins Bioengineering
David Neyens Industrial Engineering
Accomplishments
*Beals, J., *Bryant, J., *Hines, A., *Kropilak, K., *Murrell, K., *Sanna, K., *Livingstone, M., *Peer, H., *Ratterree, L., *Sizer, C., *Swafford, B., *Wagner, J., *Hargett, Z., Zemitis, S., Dean, D., DesJardins, J., Neyens, D., Harman, M. (2019, April). Informing Medical Device Design and Reprocessing through Human Factors Engineering and User Validation. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1394

Estuarine Fish Ecology I

As transitional zones between freshwater and marine environments, estuaries contain a diversity of habitat types and experience highly variable abiotic conditions. Variation in salinity has long been recognized as a factor controlling estuarine fish distributions, through its effect on behavior and physiological processes. Despite this, the ecological consequences of habitat-specific residency patterns on foraging and growth of freshwater, estuarine, and marine fish species is still not well understood. As estuaries serve as essential habitats for many recreationally and commercially important fishes, a more complete understanding of how habitat-specific estuarine conditions affect growth and survival of fishes is needed to provide managers with better information for habitat-specific management actions (e.g., protection, restoration efforts). This CI aims to explore relationships between habitat-specific residency patterns, foraging, and growth in estuarine fish populations. Students will work on team-based projects that require critical thinking, data collection, quantitative analyses, and presentation and publication of results. Students will gain essential knowledge and skills for processing samples in the lab including otolith aging, diet analysis, stable isotope analysis, preparation of gonadal tissues for histological analysis, and identification of estuarine fish and invertebrates.

Team Leaders
Troy Farmer Forestry & Environment Conserv
Meghan Angelina Forestry & Environment Conserv
Jared Chrisp Forestry & Environment Conserv
Accomplishments
*Collins, M., Chrisp, J., Angelina, M., DeVries, D., Wright, R., Farmer, T.(2019, April). Temporal patterns and environmental correlates of age-0 Southern Flounder abundance along the northern Gulf of Mexico. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1401

Creating a Health Hub for SC Rural Communities: The Living Waters Foundation Project - Prosperity, SC

This Creative Inquiry Project will facilitate the creation/expansion of a Health Hub that includes a community garden, greenhouse, and health education center on Hwy 76 in Prosperity, South Carolina.  This initiative will be associated with a well established medical practice in the community. 

Team Leaders
W Kirby Player Dept of Agricultural Services
Julianna Parham
1397

Insect Bioelectricity

Insects provide excellent opportunities to perform basic and applied biological experiments at the molecular, physiological and organismal scales. They serve as model organisms for developmental and cellular biology, and are important vectors for human and agricultural pathogens. As a result, working with insects can expose students to numerous hard and soft skills useful in a range of life-sciences fields, from medical to agricultural biology, evolutionary and ecological to developmental and immunological. In this project, students will examine patterns, mechanisms, and function associated with bioelectricity in insects, including relationship to regeneration, immunity, and pathology. Techniques used include tissue culture, fluorescence microscopy, standard virological techniques (such as plaque assays), and more. Students are required to participate in communicating data in weekly group meetings, and then via on-campus, state, regional, and national meetings.

Team Leaders
Matthew Turnbull Biological Sciences
Peng Zhang Biological Sciences
Richard Melton Biological Sciences
College of ScienceG
1568

Exploration of College Student Emotional, Physical, and Mental Wellbeing

In this Creative Inquiry project, undergraduate students will have the opportunity to partner with M.Ed. Counselor Education/Student Affairs students to participate in creating research projects, develop research skills, and contribute important insight. This class will be rooted in dialogue about campus climate and the college experiences. Students will have the chance to help develop research topics, create methodologies, collect and analyze data, and present findings. Topics will be related to the emotional, physical, and mental wellbeing of college students. An example of this could be exploring the relationship between aptitude for empathy and the first-year experience. 

Team Leaders
McKenzie McNamara Student Health Center
Tony W Cawthon Leadrshp,Counsl Ed,Hum&Org Dev
Dion Harry Strom Thurmond Institute
Savannah Lockman
1492

Decoding populist rhetoric

This project will investigate how populist leaders communicate with their followers and their political adversaries. Students will help the team leader construct a code book that will be used to analyze the public communications of populists. Students will then spend the semester coding communications made by the populists assigned to them, focusing on tweets and speeches.

Team Leaders
Matthew Rhodes-Purdy Political Science
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1400

Longleaf Pine Groundcover Restoration in the Wiregrass Gap: Seed Source, Is local best?

Students in the CI will work to create a native groundcover garden at the Camden Battlefield and Longleaf Preserve. The historic Camden Foundation recently acquired 476 acres and wished to convert the property back to longleaf as it would have been when the historic 1780 battle occurred. This property occurs in the wiregrass gap, an area in South Carolina where there is no wiregrass leading to different and diverse groundcover. In addition to the garden students will research whether seed from commerically available sources preforms as well as seed collected from local remnants. Students will grow plants in the greenhouse and learn about seed viability and germination. We will hold a workshop on our findings at the end of spring semester for area landowners who may benefit from the findings.

Team Leaders
Althea Hagan Forestry & Environment Conserv
Joan L Walker Plant & Environmental Sciences
Accomplishments
*Kome, R., *Scercy, C., Johnson, E., Hagan, A., Walker, J. (2019, April). Longleaf Pine Groundcover Restoration in the Wiregrass Gap: Seed Source, Is local best?. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1403

Climate change effects on Carolina fishes

South Carolina contains some of the southernmost populations of yellow perch in North America. Yellow perch is a cool water species that tends to prefer longer, cooler winters before spawning in the spring. It has been hypothesized that cooler winters allow yellow perch to allocate more energy towards egg development, resulting in higher quality eggs and, potentially, stronger year classes of juvenile following cooler winters. During a short,  warm winter yellow perch may be unable to allocate the necessary amount of energy to egg production resulting in lower quality eggs and lower survival of the larval yellow perch. Lower egg quality after a short winter has been documented in the northern populations, but little is known about how southern populations are acclimated to short winters. By conducting controlled laboratory experiments, this project will explore the thermal requirements of southern yellow perch populations. Specifically, this project will explore how yellow perch from southern populations will do when exposed to shorter warmer winters. Will they show the same trends as the northern populations or will they produce high quality eggs regardless of winter conditions? Conversely, this project will also explore how southern yellow perch respond when they are exposed to a long cold winter, more typical of the northern aspect of their habitat range.

Team Leaders
Troy Farmer Forestry & Environment Conserv
John Cannaday Forestry & Environment Conserv
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1440

Sullivan Center: Programs Evaluation

In this creative inquiry, students will gain hands on clinical experience working with the Joseph F. Sullivan Center (JFSC) while assisting with the development and evaluation of lifestyle medicine projects. The JFSC is an academic, clinical learning facility that operates on Clemson's campus, and has many satellite locations throughout the upstate. Additionally, the JFSC operates a mobile health clinic statewide to transform SC's rural and under served populations. The JFSC addresses root causes of disease by whole person clinical interventions, recognizing the spectrum of genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors, supporting individual, family and community vitality.  Students will be responsible for collecting data from patients directly, including vital signs like height, weight and blood pressure, during the patient visits. Program evaluation will be performed at various levels, from patient to population. Students may be responsible for analyzing data on single patients or analyzing larger data sets to ensure efficiency in case management services, depending on the student’s interests and current programs running at JFSC. Past research projects that students have assisted with include lifestyle medicine individual case studies, quality assurance, quality control and quality assessment measures for Best Chance Network patient’s lab results, and cohort studies on a population enrolled in FirstLine Therapy for 12 months or more.

Team Leaders
Caitlin Moore Clinical Ed/Pract&Med Surv Pro
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1404

Stream fish mercury dynamics in managed forests

Southeastern forests contain large pools of mercury in the terrestrial leaf litter and understory vegetation. The majority of the mercury in southeaster forests is from atmospheric deposition, meaning that even remote forests far from industrial activities may have elevated levels of mercury stored in the soil, leaf litter, and living plant biomass. Common forest management practices intended to reduce fuel loads (e.g., controlled burning, mechanical thinning) may also release mercury from soils, leaf litter, and living plant biomass into downstream aquatic environments. Mercury bioaccumulation in aquatic ecosystems, particularly in fish at the top of aquatic food chains, has been well documented in a variety of systems. However, we know very little about how fish and invertebrate mercury burdens are affected by fuel reduction practices. For example, does the amount and type of mercury (methyl versus inorganic) released into downstream aquatic systems differ between controlled burns and thinning? Additionally, how do nutrients, which are also released during forest management activities, affect stream food webs and, subsequently, mercury bioaccumulation? Students in this project will participate in collection of fish and invertebrates from forest streams in the Clemson Experimental Forest and the Santee Experimental Forest (part of the Francis Marion National Forest near Charleston, SC). Students will learn techniques for backpack electrofishing, invertebrate collections, diet analysis, and age and growth techniques using otoliths and scales. Students will also be encouraged to develop specific research questions and to develop hypotheses that could be tested with real-world data collecting during the course of this project.

Team Leaders
Troy Farmer Forestry & Environment Conserv
Donald Hagan Forestry & Environment Conserv
Brandon Peoples Forestry & Environment Conserv
Jeremy Pike Plant & Environmental Sciences
Alex Chow Forestry & Environment Conserv
Accomplishments
*Padgett, A., *Rivera, A., *Moreland, J., Ku, P., Tsui, M., Chow, A., Farmer, T. (2019, April). The Effects of Forest Management Practices on Fish Diversity in the Santee Experimental Forest, South Carolina. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1405

Reproductive performance of sows receiving vasodilators during gestation

Blood flow and nutrient partitioning during gestation has a tremendous effect on fetal growth, placental growth and function, and postnatal performance of the pig. These effects are sustained throughout life ultimately affecting carcass and meat qualities and consumer perception of the product. Vasodilators will be used during gestation to determine the appropriate dosage and timing of treatment, the effects of treatment on reproductive and physiological performance, and the effects of treatment on postnatal growth performance, carcass quality, meat quality, and consumer perception of the product. 

Team Leaders
Tiffany Wilmoth Animal & Veterinary Sciences
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1408

Words Become Worlds: Using the LIT KIT to Design Multisensory Environments for Interactive Picturebook Read-Alouds

Interdisciplinary teams (literacy and architecture) in this CI project will engage in design-based research. Teams will collaborate to design technology-enhanced interactive picturebook read-alouds for children using the LIT KIT, a programmable and portable multimedia and robotics system, to better understand how multisensory effects such as lighting, sound and moving robotics components may be leveraged to augment children’s comprehension of texts. Teams will collaborate on the selection of picturebooks and will use the LIT KIT to design multisensory read-alouds for children. Later steps in this project will engage K-5 students, both as co-designers for and as participants in multisensory read-alouds.  

Team Leaders
George Schafer Dean of Arch,Arts&Humanities
Susan Fullerton Education & Human Dev
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
1411

Biophysics of parasitic kinetoplastid motility

Motility is critical to the life cycle and pathogenicity of many parasites. While targeting motility has been successful in the treatment of multiple bacterial diseases, the motility and motile structures of eukaryotic pathogens remain understudied and under exploited as a treatment targets. A bending wave that primarily propagates from the tip to the base of their flagella drives the motility of pathogenic kinetoplastids, which are eukaryotic parasites that cause multiple neglected tropical diseases. This is unlike nearly all other eukaryotes, which beat from the base to the tip. For a variety of experimental and theoretical reasons, it is likely that unique biophysical mechanisms innate to axonemal dyneins, the molecular motors that drive flagellar motility, dictates tip-to-base motility. The broad goal of this Creative Inquiry is to identify the mechanism of tip-to-base motility of kinetoplastid flagella using Trypanosoma brucei as a model. Specifically, we will biophysically and biochemically characterize axonemal dynein that we purify from trypanosome flagella, and to identify trypanosome axonemal dynein regulation mechanisms that could yield tip-to-base motility. We will also take genetic approaches to understanding the effects of motors on cell motility. This interdisciplinary project will take molecular biological (RNAi, cloning, protein tagging), biochemical (ion exchange chromatography, in vitro reconstitutions, ATPase assays), and biophysical (ultrafast dual-trap optical tweezers, total internal reflectance fluorescence microscopy) experimental approaches. The expected outcome will a quantitative framework from which to develop pan-kinetoplastid drugs that target parasite motility. Successful completion of the project will ultimately lead to a greater understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of pathogenic parasite motility and could lead to novel treatments for African sleeping sickness, Chagas disease, and leishmaniasis.

Team Leaders
Joshua Alper Physics and Astronomy
Subash Godar Physics and Astronomy
Accomplishments
*Amlashi, P., *Hoover, H., *Kistler, S., *Lopez, E., *Markley, S., *Wentworth, K., *Hinsch, V., *Alper, J., *Godar, S. (2019, April). Single Molecule Study of Axonemal Dynein to Understand Unique Flagellar Undulation in T. Brucei. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of ScienceG
1409

Infant Cranial Remodeling

Infant cranial helmets are used when children, under the age of 1, are diagnosed with a cranial deformity. The helmets help to direct the growth of the infant’s head, in order to restore proper head shape. Students involved with the Head Start! project will work to improve the current helmet designs by using pressure mapping technology to identify proper pressure values within the helmet. All testing will be done on head molds, so no human subjects will be used.

Team Leaders
Kyle Walker Bioengineering
John D DesJardins Bioengineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1427

Real-Time Data Visualization for Manufacturing Decision Support

The CI team will engage in a project that explores real-time visualization of manufacturing sensor data to support real-time decision making on the factory floor. Ulbrich Stainless Steels & Special Metals, Inc. (Ulbrich) is a “focus factory” (factory within a factory) that equips managers and engineers with manufacturing systems to produce high precision wire for industry specific product lines. Ulbrich is seeking to develop a decision support system that will aggregate data from production milling systems and create real-time dashboards to support improved decision making.   This investigation will center around the following key research questions:  1. Decision making: In a manufacturing context, such as found at Ulbrich, what are the distinct workflows within the production process (e.g. running a machine, fixing a machine, changing a process, etc.); what are the key performance metrics associated with these processes, who are the decision makers associated with these processes (e.g. technicians, project managers, etc.); and what information do these decision makers draw upon during the decision making process?2. Pain points: Within the decision making processes identified above, what are the pain points associated with inadequate access to the necessary information in a timely, digestible format?3. Visualization: How can visualizations be designed in order to support the specific processes and to ameliorate the specific pain points identified above; how should visualizations be specialized for the different processes; and what role should interactivity play within the visualization framework?4. Implementation: In a modern manufacturing context, what are the best practices for implementation of such a visualization framework; what are the obstacles to successful adoption; and how might these obstacles be overcome?

Team Leaders
David White Watt Family Innovation Center
Dane Smith Watt Family Innovation Center
1414

Building and probing simple neuronal circuits with combined optical tweezer and microelectrode array experiment

The human brain is perhaps the most complicated system in the known universe. It is comprised of 100 billion individual neurons with about 80% of the brain mass in the cerebral cortex, which is the site of human cognition. There are massive efforts underway to understand how the brain works. What is memory, attention, perception, thought, language self-awareness, consciousness, etc.? To even begin to answer these questions, much fundamental science must be done. In this creative inquiry, we intend to build and study simple neuronal circuits, in vitro. We will use a combined optical tweezer and microelectrode array system to manipulate simple neuronal circuits, to electrically excite the circuits, and to probe the response of these circuits. We will build and study simple model logic gates out of rat or mouse neurons.

Team Leaders
Joshua Alper Physics and Astronomy
Marshall Trout Electrical & Computer Engr
Accomplishments
*O'Brien, K., *Eimen, R., *Judge, M., *Kee-Young, D., *Marosok, D., *Nikkila, J., *Taylor, A., *Alper, J., *Trout, M. (2019, April). Constructing Neural Circuits: An Integrated Optical Tweezer Microelectrode Array System for Directing the Axonal Cytoskeleton and Modulating Synaptic Strength. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of ScienceG
1426

Using Virtual Reality with the Campus Visit Experience

This projects seeks to create a virtual reality experience of Clemson's campus that can be provided to admitted and prospective students, as well as their families. The result of this project will allow visitors who would like a second look at campus, cannot visit campus or cannot walk the campus tour to still experience all that Clemson has to offer.

Team Leaders
Nate Newsome Sonoco Inst Pkg Design & Graph
Allison Griffin Promotions and Marketing
Tracey D O'Kelley University Admissions
College of BusinessD
1419

Multiplexing using Spectral Imaging and Combinatorics (MuSIC)

Cancer. This word alone is enough to scare many people. Imagine a doctor notices an abnormal growth and takes a biopsy. Results from that biopsy may take anywhere from 2-3 days to 7-10 days using traditional methods and the cost for running these tests is often high. Multiplexing using Spectral Imaging and Combinatorics (MuSIC), our proposed method, will reduce cost, time, and give more qualitative results about the tumors in situ information (grading, staging, prognosis, and treatment options). This system uses individual fluorescent proteins or a fusion of different fluorescent proteins as probes to attach to different cellular targets. While there are other systems that have tried to use combinational imaging, MuSIC is the only one that allows signals to be spatially overlapping.  Impressively, an estimated 175 probes can be used in a mixture simultaneously, increasing the abilities of quantitative fluorescent imaging capabilities ~6 fold. Other advantages to this system are the use of standard laboratory equipment, straightforward analysis of results, and requires significantly less sample. MuSIC’s potential impact on the future of cancer treatment is tremendous.

Team Leaders
Marc Birtwistle Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Madeline McCarthy
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1425

Saving Lives takes a Team: Investigating Team and Process Management in Cancer Care Coordination

Understanding how to effectively coordinate patient care has been a long-standing issue within the healthcare context. In fact, in 2016 at least 30 percent of all malpractice claims estimated that communication failures were to blame, resulting 1,744 deaths and $1.7 billion in malpractice costs over five years. The goal of this project is to help reduce these communication failures in cancer care by better understanding the care coordination process and how different healthcare teams must work together to provide effective cancer care. This project is a unique interdisciplinary effort, bringing together organizational science and industrial engineering researchers at Clemson and Greenville Health System. CI members on this team will be involved in field research including interviews, focus groups, simulations, and observations; training development and evaluation; data organization and analysis; formal presentation of findings at conferences and to GHS leadership; and other qualitative and quantitative research efforts. 

Team Leaders
Dana Verhoeven Psychology
Jordan Smith
Marissa Shuffler Psychology
Riley Mccallus
Annamaria Wolf
Kevin Taaffe Industrial Engineering
Accomplishments
*Rothermel, L., *Petrucci, T., *Welsh, J., *Lindgren, R., *Roberts, M., Pegram, R., Powers, J. Shuffler , M., Ogle, J., McNeese, N., Kleiss, M. & Schmidt, J.(2019, April). Developing a Technology-Enhanced Teamwork Training Program for Higher Education: Initial Design & Pilot Study Across Disciplines. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
*McClellan, L., *Koch, H., *Verhoeven, D., Shuffler , M., Allen, R. (2019, April). An Evaluation of Bottlenecks in Cancer Care Delivery to Enhance Patient Care. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1424

Real-Time Visualization and Modeling for Smart Building Management

Smart building technologies are viewed as a primary solution to realize increased building efficiencies, performance and maximize occupant comfort. The Watt Family Innovation Center is focused on increasing energy and water efficiencies and improved responsiveness of building systems to variable occupant loads during operational hours. We are seeking a CI team to develop a visualization and modeling system that will function in real-time. The primary development framework will use SAS Cloud technologies that are hosted at the Watt Center. We are seeking a team to work on Modeling, Visualization and Big Data processing. 

Team Leaders
David White Watt Family Innovation Center
1431

Knockdown and study of proteins in glioblastomas

Glioblastoma is the most common and the most malignant of all primary brain tumors. Prescription of drugs for such tumors would require an intricate understanding of the targets the drug would act upon and how it would affect other proteins in the cell and overall cell behavior. Our research goal would construct a network of proteins in the cell which are important in glioblastoma and help prescribe a suitable drug combination for such tumors. 

Team Leaders
Marc Birtwistle Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
Deepraj Sarmah Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1435

Clemson Sports Signal

The Robert H. Brooks Sports Science Institute brings you the Clemson Sports Signal: a Creative Inquiry used to mine social media data and track and analyze trends in the sports world.

Team Leaders
Katie McElveen Communications Studies
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1554

Impact of the microbiome on Clostridium difficile growth and toxin production

Infections caused by Clostridium difficile, an important healthcare-associated pathogen, rely on the ability of C. difficile to colonize the human gut successfully. Colonization is highly reliant on the metabolic environment provided by the gut microbiota, the indigenous microbes living in the gastrointestinal tract. This project will focus on how short chain fatty acids produced by the gut microbiota impact C. difficile growth. Students will grow C. difficile under different metabolic conditions, then measure growth and toxin production. Techniques include anaerobic cultivation, preparation of in vitro bacterial growth assays, molecular assays such as PCR, and cell culture assays to detect toxin activity. Students will also be expected to participate in weekly group meetings to discuss study results and relevant literature related to the project. We expect to present results at a local, regional, or national meeting at the conclusion of the student’s CI project. These results are expected to characterize how certain microbial metabolites contribute to C. difficile susceptibility, thus increasing our knowledge to combat C. difficile infection.

Team Leaders
Anna Seekatz Biological Sciences
College of ScienceG
1542

Nutrient sensing in protozoan parasites

The Morris lab is focused on resolving the mechanisms that protozoan parasites use to sense and metabolize the important sugar glucose during infection of their human host.  Through these studies, parasite-specific components of the sugar sensing and uptake pathway have been identified and, in an on-going collaborative effort, small molecule inhibitors of the pathways with anti-parasitic activity have been developed.  While the team has historically focused on the African trypanosome, more recent work on the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and the brain eating amoeba Naegleria fowleri suggests that exploiting the sugar metabolism pathways of these single-celled invaders may also prove useful in the development of new therapeutics.  

Team Leaders
James Morris Genetics and Biochemistry
College of ScienceG
1439

Advancement of Assisted Reproductive Technologies for Cattle and Other Species

Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) are utilized for both humans and cattle; however, ART has been and will continue to be used to save species from extinction.  Most advances used in ART currently used in all mammalian species were developed at least partially using cattle as a model. Assisted reproductive technologies commonly used in bovine reproduction are artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer.  This project will focus on methods to increase bovine semen motility post-thaw after freezing and examine the putative microRNA markers associated with early pregnancy and early pregnancy loss in pregnancies produced by in vitro fertilization.  The team will meet weekly to coordinate and plan activities for the week which would include electro-ejaculation of bulls for semen collection, semen processing and freezing in the presence or absence of specific chemical compounds, and semen analysis pre-and post-thaw, estrous synchronization of cattle, estrous detection, embryo transfer, blood collection and processing, ultrasonography, ELISA, RNA isolation and qRT-PCR.

Team Leaders
Scott Pratt Animal & Veterinary Sciences
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1450

Embodiment and Race Conference Organization

The conference on Embodiment and Race (April 12-13, 2019) is a two-day interdisciplinary conference that will explore the issues of race and embodiment from the perspectives of critical-race theory and phenomenology. The aim of the conference is to open a space for Clemson University and the local community where we can extend and deepen our understanding of recent debates on race, racialization, and being an embodied agent of a minority group. This conference will bring together academics who work on race and embodiment to share their studies and discuss different approaches to these issues. In my teaching I explore the issues of philosophy of racism and racial embodiment focusing on questions: What role does embodiment play in the experience of racism and/or racial harm? How do various social policies benefit or burden people classified as being a given race? Does racism harm the racist as well as the victim? 

Team Leaders
Edyta Kuzian Philosophy and Religion
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
1449

Workplace Identity Disclosure

This CI team’s focus will be to better understand the factors that influence an individual’s decision to share their concealable identities (e.g. sexual orientation, criminal history, learning disability, mental disorders, etc.) to their employer or co-workers. A large portion of this research is also to develop a better understanding of the similarities and differences between specific concealable identity groups with regards to variables such as self-acceptance, positive/negative identity perceptions, identity salience, identity centrality, and need for social support. We will also explore other positive psychology variables impacting workers such as courage and life satisfaction. The main component of this team will involve reviewing articles, verbal presentations/ leading discussion, coding data, generating research questions and ultimately developing a model to better understand identity disclosure. The purpose of this field of research is to improve the professional and personal lives of workers with concealable stigmatized identities.  This may be accomplished through the development of progressive and effective organizational interventions and policies regarding diversity and inclusion.

Team Leaders
Cynthia Pury Psychology
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1446

Pathways to Graduate Education

Pathways to Graduate Education is a program to engage underrepresented undergraduate students in robust research and exploration of graduate education opportunities. The students in the CI will understand the graduate education process while participating in the development and implementation of a research project. This CI will encourage students to be active participants in developing a research project, around social justice, applicable to their respective fields.

Team Leaders
Cherese Fine Charles H. Houston Center
Sara Hanks
DeOnte Brown New Student & Family Programs
Jerad Green Gantt Multicultural Center
College of EducationE
1493

Ron Clark Academy and New Teacher Effectiveness

Students will have the opportunity to interview College of Education graduates from 2017 and 2018 to discuss how the Ron Clark Academy Teacher Training helped them in developing their classroom management style, course/academic expectations of their students, and readied them for success as classroom teachers.

Team Leaders
Natalie Pough Teaching & Learning
College of EducationE
1506

Substance Abuse and Cognition

  Substance Use Disorder (SUD) is a chronic, complex condition that is among the most prevalent of mental health disorders. To evaluate effective treatment approaches, it is important to first assess risk factors for relapse and barrier to recovery. While potential individual risk factors have been identified, there is currently no research aimed at systematically investigating how these factors together establish an individual’s risk for relapse. Thus, the purpose of this investigation is to identify specific risk factors for relapse and barriers to addiction recovery in individuals who are hospitalized at Greenville Memorial Hospital due to complications from SUD.  This research is a randomized control trial that will examine how neurocognitive, health, and personal risk factors as well and social, financial, and situational barriers influence recovery. Additionally, this project will evaluate which barriers a recovery coaching intervention can overcomes and what risk factors recovery coaching can mitigate. Students will be involved in working with patients at Greenville Memorial Hospital to collecting all survey data, cognitive assessments, and neuroimaging measures.

Team Leaders
Kaileigh Byrne Psychology
Zhuo Job Chen Psychology
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1505

Immunity and Infections in Zebrafish

Infectious disease is an increasing problem, and the overall goal of our research is to better understand how our innate immune system combats pathogens. We use zebrafish as a model host for infection studies to investigate mechanisms of infection and immunity. The goal of this project is to understand how anti-fungal drugs affect the zebrafish host immune system, using both gene expression studies and microscopy.

Team Leaders
Emily Rosowski Biological Sciences
College of ScienceG
1453

Investigating Peer Relationships on Clemson's Campus

This research project will explore peer relationships, specifically among PAL leaders or tutors and their participants, and their influence on student perceptions of belonging and/or learning. This topic will be investigated using a qualitative research approach including interviews with both students and peer leaders. The specific research questions and details of the study will be developed by the student research team over the course of this CI. This project will inform the peer leader training approaches used at the Academic Success Center and will expand the current understanding of the influence peer leaders can have on student success at their institutions.

Team Leaders
Rachel Anderson Academic Success Center
Jenai Kelley Academic Success Center
Laurel Ann Whisler Academic Success Center
1457

Frontline Service Robots and AI

This Creative Inquiry is designed to provide business, psychology, and engineering students with an opportunity to empirically explore issues related to “frontline service” robots and artificial intelligence entities. In other words, robots and AI’s designed to assist customers rather assist with the manufacture of products. Relevant topics include services marketing, social psychology, human-computer interaction, and strategic HR. 

Team Leaders
Michael Giebelhausen Marketing
Accomplishments
*Dunlavey, S., *Garrett, E., *Geyer, D., *Giebelhausen, M., *Heffron, E., *Lindsey, K., *Lucisano, A., *Mcglynn, G. (2019, April). Ready Retail Robots! Two Studies Examining the Influence of Frontline Robots on Retail Consumption Behaviors. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of BusinessD
1458

Statismic - Statistical Education Website

Collaboration between Computer Science, Statistics, and Education to develop an interactive website.  The website will help teach concepts of an Introductory Statistics course (undergraduate or high school).  Students will use visual representations, web graphical techniques, and innovation pedagogy to develop a cutting edge website/applet page.  Continued research will be done to test the usefulness of the web site.  

Team Leaders
Ellen Breazel Mathematical Sciences
College of ScienceG
1459

American Alligator Ecology

As part of this project, students will assist with a broader study aimed at understanding alligator ecology in urbanized landscapes (i.e., golf course communities) in order to provide communities with information to reduce the risk of human-alligator interactions.  Students will assist current graduate students with visual surveys to detect alligators, develop a standard protocol for conducting visual surveys across a set of residential communities in South Carolina, and train community biologists how to implement the protocol.  In addition, students will work to develop and publish a website for education and outreach.  

Team Leaders
Cathy Jachowski Forestry & Environment Conserv
Anje Kidd-Weaver Forestry & Environment Conserv
Accomplishments
*Chardt, A., *Goff, C., *Greulich, L., *Lowe, T., *Tice, C., *Kidd-Weaver, A., *Jachowski, C. (2019, April). Advancing Public Awareness and Education of Alligator Ecology in South Carolina. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1460

The McLaren Project

The McLaren Project is a creative research project conducted through the Erwin Center for Brand Communications. Students will work collaboratively with the Marketing and Communications team at McLaren Automotive, as well as industry and intellectual leaders to develop a marketing campaign geared toward the luxury/supercar buyer and pitch their campaign to McLaren Automotive at the conclusion of the course. 

Team Leaders
Lori Pindar Communications Studies
Katie Hildebrand Graphic Communications
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1463

Engagement at Every Level - A study of effective practices in K-12 classrooms

This Creative Inquiry will offer an opportunity for the students to explore the necessity of social emotional learning and the development of soft skills in the classroom. The student organization, ASCD at CU, plans to host a state-level Amazing Shake competition at Clemson. Prior to doing this, the Amazing Shake committee will do a study on student efficacy in schools that focus on SEL and soft skills. There is a significant amount of planning, relationship building, and organization needed to bring this event to Clemson which includes the students having the time to develop a holistic understanding as to why these events are necessary. All aspects of this opportunity will benefit in the development of future teachers. It will also provide students significant exposure to a variety of schools throughout the state of South Carolina. About the Amazing Shake National Competition: The Amazing Shake is a competition that places an emphasis on teaching students manners, discipline, respect, and professional conduct. Prior to the competition, students learn the nuances of professional human interaction as they are taught skills such as how to give a proper handshake, how to “work a room,” how to give a successful interview, and how to remain composed under pressure. The goal is to prepare our students so that they are able to present themselves exceptionally well for opportunities today as well as those that will come in the future. (From: http://www.ronclarkacademy.com/nationals)

Team Leaders
Natalie Pough Teaching & Learning
College of EducationE
1468

Gender Reveal: Determining fetal sex in dairy cows via maternal hormone concentration

Bulls are often a drain on the resources of a dairy; therefore, dairy herds could be managed more effectively if farm managers were able to know the sex of each fetus as early as possible.  Fetal sex determination may be possible prior to day 60 by measuring the concentration of the hormone Insulin-like Factor 3 (INSL3). INSL3 is a hormone of the relaxin family which has been previously characterized as a male reproductive hormone primarily involved in the development and migration of the testes. More recent research has uncovered its additional roles in the female reproductive system, particularly related to ovulation and the estrous cycle. Previous research also indicates that circulating INSL3 levels of mammalian mothers are elevated when they are carrying a male fetus; therefore, the aim of this study is to determine the earliest point at which the sex of the fetus can be predicted in dairy cows via measurment of maternal serum levels of INSL3.

Team Leaders
Tiffany Wilmoth Animal & Veterinary Sciences
Jenny Presgraves Animal & Veterinary Sciences
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1469

The Rivalry Lab

This is a cross-disciplinary, cross-cultural effort to understand the nature and outcomes of rivalry phenomena in sports and in the marketplace. Participants will have the opportunity to conduct primary research (rivalry experiments for theory-testing), secondary research (e.g., rivalry-related social media analytics), and curation (develop rivalry databases). This CI will be open indefinitely.

Team Leaders
Scott Swain Marketing
Oswald King Languages
Accomplishments
*Ball, L., *Bottini, B., *Dieterich, T., *Enright, C., *Pescatore, O., *Ruddy, J., *Uscilla, B., *Whetter, B., *Zavaski, C., Swain, S., King, O. (2019, April). Rivalries as Relational Schemas. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of BusinessD
1470

Environmental effects of co-contaminant exposure

Ecotoxicological studies traditionally determine or model effects resulting from single pollutants, yet no environmental contaminant is ever truly the sole toxicant in a contamination scenario. This project seeks to characterize the uptake, distribution, and/or effects of multiple environmental contaminants at different levels of biological organization. Students will study stress markers such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), gene expression, DNA methylation, and visual changes to determine if traditional ecotoxicological models sufficiently predict the effect of combined exposures.  

Team Leaders
Nicole Martinez Environmental Engr & Earth Sci
Lisa Manglass
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1471

Machine Learning in Finance and Real Estate

This project will bring students across disciplines together to develop the most wanted applications of machine learning in finance and real estate investments. Students will collaborate and learn to use big data and Machine Learning tools to solve questions in the business world. This project will help students across different departments, creating the environment of a startup company. Together we will network, learn, explore, and succeed.

Team Leaders
Yannan Shen Finance
College of BusinessD
1473

Technology commercialization: from lab bench to business

Building a successful business around a new technology takes more than just a research discovery. Commercialization requires creating a customer base, determining value proposition and building a business model. Every new commercial product, besides being great, requires someone who buys it. Therefore, the road towards commercialization starts with customer interviews. Over the years successful entrepreneurs developed a uniformed approach to generate robust, repeatable, scalable business model. It is called business canvas. In this project the PIs, who are successful entrepreneurs themselves, will guide you through the process of generation and completion of business canvas.

Team Leaders
Alexey Vertegel Bioengineering
Vladimir Reukov Bioengineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1472

Artificial Intelligence, Architectural Aesthetics, and House Price

This project provides a novel perspective on using artificial intelligence to study how architecture value affects real estate prices. Students will be guided to create a database based on the building aesthetic values that could be used for modeling house values using machine learning tools. It is an exciting opportunity for students to apply their knowledge from finance and engineering backgrounds to study real-world problems.

Team Leaders
Yannan Shen Finance
College of BusinessD
1474

Design and Implementation of the Human Machine Interface for the 2030 Autonomous Vehicle

This project is designed to engage undergraduate Clemson students using an innovative educational method that allows Engineering and Psychology majors to apply academic knowledge and skills to the area of autonomous vehicles. During the semester students will focus on the design and implementation of the human machine interface for the 2030 self-driving car which will provide user experiences related to personalization, digital trust and usability.     

Team Leaders
Pierluigi Pisu Campbell Grad Engr Program
Jerome McClendon School of Computing
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1475

Implementing Open Educational Resources into the Undergraduate Curricula in the College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences

Open educational resources (OER) are freely available resources that supplement or can be used in a course in lieu of the textbook. The goal of using OER is to decrease the cost of education. For example, when OER is used in a class, students may be able to purchase an older version of the textbook, or they may be able to avoid purchasing the textbook altogether. Classes that use OER give students access to the class materials on the first day of class. Studies have shown that student learning and grades are higher when this is possible. In this Creative Inquiry, students will work with Primary Team Leader, Dr. Rachel Getman, who is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, to increase the use of OER in the Clemson University College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences.

Team Leaders
Rachel Getman Chemical & Biomolecular Eng
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1479

Breaking the Resolution

Biophotonics is a multidisciplinary field which combines biology, photonics, and electronics to further our understanding of cellular biological processes within functional and dysfunctional tissues using optical microscopy techniques. This CI was created to allow students to design and build an optical system which pushes the limits in optical microscopy resolution to observe cellular events that would be undetectable using current techniques.

Team Leaders
Zhi Gao Bioengineering
Lucas Schmidt Bioengineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1478

Connected Care- Healthcare Networking Application Development

This creative inquiry project will focus on developing a dynamic innovative mobile platform focused on advancing indiviualized home healthcare services. The purpose of this Creative Inquiry project is to:Evaluate existing healthcare systemsExamine regulatory/healthcare policies Explore the applicability of developing a social networking site to establish patient-provider relationships in a mobile, hybrid application  

Team Leaders
Janice Lanham School of Nursing
Accomplishments
*Farquhar, K., *Flores, N., *Gordon, T., *Kalacanic, C., *Rybecky, S., *Brock, M., *Barre, J., *Murrant-Johnson, A., Lanham, J. (2019, April). Connected Care Application Development. Poster presentation at Clemson University 14th Annual Focus on Creative Inquiry Forum, Clemson, SC.
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1480

Advanced manufacturing by ultrafast lasers

This project includes hands-on participation to learn the state-of-the-art ultrafast laser and use it for micro-manufacturing and shock peening. 

Team Leaders
Xin Zhao Mechanical Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1481

Engineering Biology of Arthropods

We explore structural and organismal features of insects from the physics and materials point of view looking at the physical determinants of the materials performance and evolution of insect fibrous materials. We are interested in mechanisms of nano and micro fluid movements, sensitivity of insect antennae and analysis of structural and physical properties of insect fibrous materials.  Check out these videos, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JCIOOWm8w8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHDbdKj8NuM  

Team Leaders
Konstantin Kornev Materials Science&Engineering
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1627

Identification and treatment options for Pregnant or Parenting Women with Substance Use Disorder

To focus of this Creative Inquiry is the examination of the strategies of identification of substance use and the co-morbid conditions present for women who are pregnant or parenting with substance use disorder.  The students will have the opportunity to participate in all levels of the research process from literature review to dissemination of the study findings.  The mother-infant/child dyad will be the population of interest as well as pregnant women with substance use disorder.  Consideration will also be given to substances of exposure during pregnancy that may not be in the category of substance use disorder.  

Team Leaders
Mary Wright School of Nursing
College of Behavioral, Social & Health SciencesC
1517

Stories of Refuge, Detention, and Hospitality

Team members will examine asylum detention in the United States, with a long-term view to questioning and improving methods of providing hospitality to asylum seekers. The project centers on a 2-3 day visit to the Stewart Detention Center in Lumpkin, Georgia, in relation with the El Refugio hospitality house, where students will interview detainees and other relevant actors in the detention process. Students will prepare for the visit through literature review and by organizing campus visits of representatives of migrant communities and legal scholars. Students will organize a post-visit, public forum on campus at which they will present their findings. They may also find relevant publication venues.

Team Leaders
Joseph Mai Languages
Angela Naimou English
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
1507

Making to Learn Geometry

There is emerging evidence to support “maker activities” to support STEM learning, although the role and impact of “making” as part of the K-12 education experience is in its infancy. The primary purpose of this project is to conceptualize, design, and test makerspace activity prototypes and related learning modules that would be appropriate for use in local middle grades classrooms. As part of this process, our team will study the makerspace literature as it relates to learning geometry. We will also interview local teachers/students and observe their classrooms in order to assess their needs and wants. Opportunities for conducting student research and/or assisting project leaders with a future grant research project will be offered.

Team Leaders
Nicole A. Bannister Teaching & Learning
College of EducationE
1516

The Mary Bruce Project: Women and the Golden Age of Tropical Medicine

The turn of the last century was marked by a golden era in tropical medicine. British doctors and researchers working in the British Colonies in Africa and the tropics made major discoveries, including elucidating the infectious agents that cause malaria, sleeping sickness, and schistosomiasis. However, the stories of women and their contributions to the history of tropical medicine are largely untold.Sir David Bruce was a Scottish doctor working for the British Army in colonial Africa and the tropics. One of his major discoveries was working out that sleeping sickness was transmitted by the tsetse fly. In Bruce's papers, there are illustrations of the trypanosomes drawn by Bruce's wife, Mary Bruce, who was working alongside Sir David in the field. In a number of Bruce's papers, Mary Bruce is even listed as an author! Our starting hypothesis is that Mary Bruce contributed in significant ways to the scientific research of her husband David Bruce. This project seeks to answer the following questions: What was Mary Bruce's role in Sir David Bruce's many discoveries? What is Mary Bruce's own story?With the aim of telling Mary Bruce's story (and the stories of those like her), this project has two goals: (1) To expand the online presence of information about women in the golden age of tropical medicine via Wikipedia entries, a publicly accessible Mary Bruce Project blog, and generation of a dedicated online archive; (2) To generate and submit for publication at years' end at least one popular science article arising from our research.

Team Leaders
Kimberly Paul Genetics and Biochemistry
College of ScienceG
1518

Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Brain development is a carefully choreographed process orchestrated by many different cell types in the brain. The laboratory studies the cellular and molecular events that control brain neural stem cells and their progeny. The goal of this Creative Inquiry project is to provide insight into how these events normally occur and what goes awry in neurodevelopmental diseases.

Team Leaders
David Feliciano Biological Sciences
College of ScienceG
1519

Affordable Automation for the Entertainment Industry

For most touring theatre productions, the locations of production elements are marked by hand using a tedious measuring and checking system. The objective of this project is to develop an affordable new tool for the entertainment industry called the PlotBot, a programmable robot that will accurately mark the locations of production elements such as scenery, overhead or rigging based elements, seating and the parameters of the space in which they are to be installed. The PlotBot will utilize a CAD-based interface and the user would input the configuration of the stage space, then overlay the ground plan plot for stage elements. With this information, the PlotBot would physically plot the points on the deck, similar to how a laser cutter or CNC router work. There are robots that serve similar functions that could be adapted to house this technology but are cost prohibitive for much of the industry. This four semester project will be completed in three main phases: (1) Planning and Design, (2) Fabrication, and (3) Testing and Improvement. During the third phase, we plan to allow tours to use the PlotBot and provide feedback as tours provide a controlled laboratory for testing and improvement. Near the end of the project, we will present the prototype at the USITT conference. In addition, we will also publish on the development and design of the PlotBot, the educational experience of a diverse student team, and additional applications of the PlotBot (e.g., tradeshows, construction, real estate, sporting events, street festivals, etc.

Team Leaders
Matthew Leckenbusch Performing Arts
Shannon Robert Performing Arts
Bradley J Putman Engineering,Computing,Appl Sci
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
1543

Development of Mobile Application for the National Brick Research Center

This Creative Inquiry will center around developing a mobile application for the National Brick Research Center. The mobile application will be based off of our current website and made with our industry members in mind. App users will have access to technical webinars, Brickyard Magazine, testing request forms, and information on various educational sessions including short courses, webinars and the annual Clemson Brick Forum. Usage analytics will be the basis for future enhancements. We will work from the beginning starting with design and layout and moving into coding, content integration, and deployment.

Team Leaders
John Sanders National Brick Research Center
Randi Sims
Anne Jenkins National Brick Research Center
Gary W Parker National Brick Research Center
College of Engineering, Computing & Applied SciencesF
1521

Deer-coyote interactions

White-tailed deer are an important game species and coyotes may be impacting their populations in South Carolina. There is evidence that coyotes eat deer fawns, but this may depend on deer density and habitat. This CI will involve learning about deer-coyote interactions and how we are quantifying them, processing wildlife camera photos, performing limited field work, and developing/executing/presenting a research project. This CI will require a 2 semester commitment.  

Team Leaders
David Jachowski Forestry & Environment Conserv
Michael Muthersbaugh
Alex Jensen
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA
1532

Effective Altruism

Effective Altruism (EA) is a movement which uses evidence and reason to discover and promote the most effective ways to help other people. Most of us have a strong desire to do good, and the EA movement seeks to harness that desire to the greatest effect by encouraging research into the most pressing problems in the world today and the most effective ways to solve them. EA focuses on determining which charities, research causes, and career paths do the most good. The philosophy of the movement is deeply rooted in consequentialist moral philosophy, and was given perhaps its first clear articulation in Singer’s famous 1972 paper “Famine, Affluence, and Morality”. Since the early 2000s, the movement has taken hold on the internet, garnering substantial support through groups such as Giving What We Can and Givewell, and has been the subject of a few popular books, including Singer’s The Most Good You Can Do and William MacAskill’s Doing Good Better. The purpose of this group is to research and explore the ideas of Effective Altruism and its practical recommendations concerning such subjects as optimal careers, charities, and cause areas. Among other things, each member of the team will complete a research project into determining their optimal career path, and the team as a whole will promote effective causes to organizations on campus which raise money for charity. This project will enable students to examine philosophical concepts, delve into research from diverse fields such as psychology, economics, and ethics, and apply these ideas in the real world.

Team Leaders
Stephen Satris Philosophy and Religion
Caleb Hylkema
College of Architecture, Arts & HumanitiesB
1533

Maze following and cell-to-cell communication in Slime Mold.

Slime molds are known to follow mazes in laboratory settings. Students will explore how to grow, maintain, and use various species of slime molds for experimentation, replicate existing maze following experiments, and use the results to generate new hypotheses related to maze following and cell-to-cell communication in slime molds.

Team Leaders
V Christine M Minor Biological Sciences
College of ScienceG
1571

Cognitive and Metabolic Impacts of Coffee

The focus of this Creative Inquiry (CI) is to study the impacts of coffee on cognitive processes and energy expenditure to determine if it is effective in improving cognition or increasing metabolic rate. As coffee contains numerous compounds that have been shown to have neurophysiological effects, it is necessary to understand how its use could be impacting cognitive functioning and metabolic rate. Students will be able to develop and test hypotheses to determine if coffee can be used to improve cognition or metabolism by performing cognitive and metabolic testing. 

Team Leaders
Lacey Durrance Food, Nutrition & Package Sci
College of Agriculture, Forestry & Life SciencesA