Skip to content

Woodland Cemetery Historic Preservation

2022 Research Symposium

Historic Cemeteries in Cultural Contexts

Local to Global

October 24-25, 2022
Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina

The Woodland Cemetery and African American Burial Ground Historic Preservation Project and the Legacy Council at Clemson University are pleased to invite you to participate in our second annual Research Symposium. This year's theme, "Historic Cemeteries in Cultural Contexts, Local to Global," encompasses the broadest conception of burial grounds, from local cemeteries to shipwrecks on the seafloor. Burial grounds in diverse places require recognition and memorialization. Over two days, this symposium will bring together research concerning historic burial grounds and cemeteries; the local, national, global, and cultural contexts of cemetery research and community engagement; and the multifaceted efforts to commemorate such spaces.

This symposium is sponsored by the Legacy Council and Clemson University. The symposium is free and open to everyone, but registration is required for each participant. If you have further questions about the Research Symposium, please email afamburials@clemson.edu or call (864) 656-8855.

Registration is now closed.
Field stones mark unknown graves in Woodland Cemetery.

Local Arrangements

  • Hotel Accommodations
    James F. Martin Inn

    230 Madren Center Drive
    Clemson, SC 29631
    James F. Martin Inn Hotel Website
    Hotel Phone: 1-888-654-9020

    Call hotel to make reservation with credit card by September 7, 2022
    Rooms can be reserved for the nights of October 23, 24, and 25
    King rooms only - $134/night + tax and incidentals

    Reservation Code: GF24175
    Hotel Block name: Historic Cemeteries Research Symposium


    Tru by Hilton

    13050 Clemson Boulevard
    Seneca, SC 29678
    Tru by Hilton Hotel Website

    Rooms must be reserved by September 23, 2022
    Rooms can be reserved for the nights of October 23, 24, and 25
    King and Standard 2-Queen rooms available @ $109/night + tax and incidentals

    You can make a reservation one of two ways:
    1. Call the hotel directly at 1-864-280-8800 and reference the name “CU Cemetery Symposium” and the dates of your stay
    2. Make the reservation online
    Note: A credit card is needed to guarantee the reservation.


    Courtyard Marriott

    201 Canoy Lane
    Clemson, SC 29631
    Courtyard Marriott Hotel Website

    Reservations must be made by October 9, 2022
    Rooms: King w/pullout and Standard Double
    Rate: $107/night + tax and incidentals

    Call 864-654-8833 and ask for “Cemetery Symposium” rate.
    Note: Credit card required to guarantee reservation.


    The Abernathy Hotel

    157 Old Greenville Highway
    Clemson, SC 29631
    Abernathy Hotel Hotel Website

    Reservations must be made by September 23, 2022
    Rooms: King Deluxe only
    Rate: $138/night + taxes and incidentals

    Call 864-654-5299 and ask for Conference 2023 event rate.
    Note: A credit card is needed to guarantee the reservation.

  • Traveling to Clemson
    Driving to Clemson

    From Atlanta, GA: Take I-85 N to exit 19B toward Clemson University. Follow US-76 for approximately 12 miles. Exit off US-76 onto SC-93 S toward Clemson University. Exit off US-76 onto SC-93 S toward Clemson University.

    From Greenville/Spartanburg, SC or Charlotte, NC: Take I-85 S to exit 19B for US-76 W/SC-28 W toward Clemson University. Follow US-76 for approximately 12 miles. Exit off US-76 onto SC-93 S toward Clemson University.

    From Columbia, SC: Take I-126 W to I-26 W toward Spartanburg, SC; exit I-385 N to Greenville, SC; exit I-85 S toward Atlanta, GA; take exit 19B for US-76 W/SC-28 W toward Clemson University. Follow US-76 for approximately 12 miles. Exit off US-76 onto SC-93 S toward Clemson University. 

    From Asheville, NC: Take US-74 W to US-23 S to I-240 S to I-40 E toward Winston-Salem, NC; exit I-26 E toward Charleston, SC; exit US-25 S toward Travelers Rest; exit US-123 S toward Easley; go through Easley, SC, on 123 to Clemson.

    From Jacksonville, FL: Take I-95 N toward Fayetteville, NC; exit I-26 W toward Spartanburg, SC; exit I-385 N toward Greenville, SC; exit I-85 S toward Atlanta, GA; take exit 19B for US-76 W/SC-28 W toward Clemson University. Follow US-76 for approximately 12 miles. Exit off US-76 onto SC-93 S toward Clemson University.

    Closest Airports

    The closest airport to Clemson University is the Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport and is about a one-hour drive away. Other airports are located about a 2.5-hour drive away. Please be aware that no public transportation runs between any airport and Clemson University. We suggest booking a rental car or using a car service or rideshare service.

    Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport, Greenville, South Carolina (49 miles from Clemson). Ground transportation and rental cars available at GSP airport.

    Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Atlanta, Georgia (130 miles from Clemson) Ground transportation and rental cars available at ATL airport.

    Charlotte Douglas International Airport, Charlotte, North Carolina (130 miles from Clemson) Ground transportation and rental cars available at CLT airport.

    Columbia Metropolitan Airport, Columbia, South Carolina (138 miles from Clemson) Ground transportation and rental cars available at CAE airport.

    Asheville Regional Airport, Asheville, North Carolina (75 miles from Clemson) Ground transportation and rental cars available at airport

  • On-Campus Parking and Transit
    Symposium Parking

    Symposium participants can park in the P-7 and P-8 commuter lots at the intersection of Perimeter Road and Highway 76. Tiger Transit shuttles will run every 15 minutes between these lots and the Hendrix Center. On Tuesday, October 25, the last Tiger Transit shuttle to the P-7/P-8 commuter lots will depart at 6:30pm after the closing reception for the symposium.

    To park for the keynote lecture on Monday October 24 at 6:30pm in the Strom Thurmond Institute Auditorium, there will be relaxed parking in the lots for the Strom Thurmond Institute (lot E-29) and the Brookes Center (lot C-11). If you parked in the P-7/P-8 lots during the day, you will want to move your car to one of those lots before the lecture starts that evening.

    Campus Parking Map

    Alternative Option: Visitor Weekday Parking Pass

    Visitors can purchase Daily Weekday permits online for $8 per day. This new service allows Clemson University visitors to purchase discounted daily permits instantly and print them from their home or office computers. In order to purchase an online Weekday Visitor permit, you must have a valid email address and the make, model year, color and license plate of their vehicle to create a Guest Account. If after creating a guest account and you are a returning Visitor, go to www.clemson.edu/parking and click on Manage My account. Individuals are able to purchase permits up to 14 days in advance for designated lots. The designated lots are located directly on CAT bus routes which serve the east and west sides of campus so you can decide which lot to park in. Transportation service will be provided to and from these lots from 7:30 am until 5:30 pm Monday through Friday.

    Parking Locations Map

    Alternative Option: Visitor Metered Parking

    Visitors can also park at over 400 conveniently located metered Visitor parking spaces on campus without the need to obtain a permit. Metered parking is $2.25 per hour and multiple payment options include quarter, $1.00 bills, credit and debit cards, or via the Flowbird App for touchless payment.

    Visitor Metered Parking Map

    More information about on-campus parking can be found on the Clemson Visitor Parking website.

    Campus Transit

    The Tiger Transit Campus Buses are available to all Clemson University visitors.

    Walking and Handicap Accessible Map

    Use this map for information on walking around campus and locations of handicapped access.

  • Food and Dining

    A continental breakfast will be provided on the morning of Day 2, Tuesday October 25. Light refreshments will be available between panels. Sandwich boxes will also be available at the closing reception on October 25. Participants are responsible for all other meals.

    Campus Dining

    The Hendrix Center has several options available, including Einstein Bros Bagels, ice cream, and a grab-n-go convenience store. McAlister Hall has a cafeteria buffet with vegetarian and vegan options, Raising Cane's Chicken, Which Wich, Twisted Taco, and Starbucks.

    Explore this Campus Dining Map for more information.

    Nearby Food and Dining
  • COVID-19 Guidelines

    The Research Symposium will follow Clemson University's guidelines for COVID-19.

    Masks and Face Coverings

    Face masks are NOT required in University facilities with the exception of in medical facilities and testing sites and on public transportation (CATBus, TigerTransit). Masks are encouraged in instructional areas (classrooms, instructional labs) and research labs.

    Note that individuals exiting isolation and quarantine are still required to mask for five days.

    Physical Distancing

    All University facilities, including instructional and research areas, will operate at full capacity. No physical distancing requirements will be in place at this time.

    Vaccines

    Clemson does not require COVID-19 vaccines but strongly encourages anyone who wants and is able to receive a COVID-19 vaccine to do so. You can read more about the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines from the CDC and DHEC.

  • Exploring the Clemson Area
    Museums and Historic Sites

    Below is a list of libraries, museums and historic sites near Clemson University, including Pendleton, Anderson, Greenville, Seneca, and Oconee County.

Symposium Map

This map shows building locations for symposium events and nearby hotels. Explore the campus maps for further information.

Symposium Schedule

Day One - Monday, October 24


8:00am - 2:00pm | Registration
McKissick Theater Registration Space, Hendrix Center, 1st floor

Field Trips to Local Historic Cemeteries


8:30am - 12:00pm
Clemson University
  • Keowee Plantation Cemetery This cemetery is located on the hillside on the site of the Keowee Heights Plantation of John Ewings Colhoun that operated from the 1790s to 1840s. All that remains is the family burial stone enclosure and over 80 unmarked graves of the enslaved African Americans who lived and worked on this property. Clemson University currently manages this portion of the Experimental Forest for the State of South Carolina.
  • Lawrence Plantation Cemetery Benjamin Lawrence established a plantation on the land that was granted him by the U.S. government for his Revolutionary War service. The plantation was located east of John Colhoun’s Keowee Heights Plantation in the early 1800s. Lawrence is buried there, and a memorial stone was placed at his grave at a ceremony in 1962. There are several unmarked graves in this cemetery, as well, whose identities are not currently known. The Lawrence Plantation Cemetery is located in the Clemson Experimental Forest.
  • Hopewell Plantation Cemetery General Andrew Pickens established the Hopewell Plantation on the land granted to him for his service in the Revolutionary War. The original cemetery for enslaved African Americans is located near the current Hopewell house off West Cherry Road in Clemson, SC. Subsequent owners of the Hopewell Plantation, including Andrew Pickens, Jr., also enslaved African Americans, who might be buried in the cemetery.

Meet in the Hendrix Center Lobby. Shuttle transportation is provided to and from the field trip location. This field trip takes place outside. It requires walking on unpaved pathways in a hilly and wooded area. Comfortable tennis shoes, long pants, long sleeves, and hats/head coverings are encouraged. Water, sun protection, and bug spray are also encouraged.


9:00am, 10:00am, 11:00am - Tours offered on the hour
Woodland Cemetery and African American Burial Ground

Take a one-hour guided tour of Woodland Cemetery and the African American Burial Ground on Clemson University’s campus. More than 1,000 souls rest in this sacred ground. The Clemson Board of Trustees founded Woodland Cemetery in 1924 as a segregated cemetery for white employees. It is the burial place for over 600 Clemson employees and their families, including past Clemson presidents and professors. Between July 2020 and January 2021, ground penetrating radar (GPR) recovered about 600 unmarked graves in the cemetery. These graves are believed to belong to African and African American enslaved persons, sharecroppers, domestic workers, tenant farmers, convicted laborers, and wage workers and their families who lived and died on the land from the antebellum era through the Jim Crow era.

Meet at the entrance to Woodland Cemetery on Woodland Drive at the intersection of Williamson Road and S. Palmetto Boulevard (at the top of the hill adjacent to Memorial Stadium). This tour is outside and requires walking on paved and unpaved pathways. Comfortable tennis shoes, sun protection, bug spray, and bottled water are encouraged.


8:30am - 10:00am and 10:30am - 12:00pm
Pendleton, SC
  • King's Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church Cemetery is an active historic cemetery owned by King’s Chapel AME Church. This African American cemetery dates back to the pre-civil war era. The cemetery holds the remains of enslaved African Americans and veterans dating back to World War II. The church was organized in 1865. The stone monument was constructed in 1993 to commemorate the restoration of the cemetery.
  • St. Paul's Episcopal Church Cemetery is an active burial site for members and family members of St. Paul's and Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in Clemson. St. Paul's was founded in 1819 by a group of wealthy planters and enslavers and successful merchants and tradesmen living in and around Pendleton Village. There are several historical figures from the heyday of the Upstate's political and social prominence buried in the churchyard, including Charles Coatesworth Pinckney, Floride Calhoun, and Anna Calhoun and Thomas Green Clemson. There are four Black burials recorded in the St. Paul's register, all located in the same plot, and all dating between 1866 and 1880.

Meet in the Hendrix Center Lobby. Shuttle transportation is provided to and from the field trip location. Both field trips take place outside. Comfortable tennis shoes, sun protection, bug spray, and bottled water are encouraged.


12:00pm - 1:30pm | Lunch Break

Enjoy lunch on your own and with fellow symposium participants. The Hendrix Center has several options. Explore this campus dining map for more information.


Symposium Workshops


1:00pm - 5:00pm

Workshop Session 1

You Have a Historic Cemetery, What Now? Cemetery and Tombstone Preservation
Old Stone Church, Clemson, SC
  • Dr. David Markus, Assistant Professor in the Clemson Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice Department

Meet in the Hendrix Center Lobby. Shuttle transportation is provided to and from the workshop location.This workshop covers cemeteries as cultural resources, managing historic cemeteries, laws that protect marked and unmarked burials, and recording historic cemeteries for the South Carolina Master Site File. It will also include in-field training for 1) cemetery landscape and headstone documentation activities (headstone measurements on text documentation) and 2) cleaning headstones with D/2 biological solution (and what not to do!)


Workshop Session 2

1:00pm - 2:15pm
Preserving the Stories of Cemeteries through Oral History
Sirrine Hall 218
  • Dr. Le Datta Grimes, Oral Historian at Clemson University Libraries

This interactive workshop will provide an introduction to conducting oral histories for cemetery research, including project planning, best practices and equipment, interview techniques, and ethical considerations.

1:30pm - 2:45pm
Exploring the Archives to Document Historic Cemeteries
Learning Lab in Special Collections and Archives, Strom Thurmond Institute
  • Brenda Burk, University Records Officer, Clemson University Libraries
  • Dr. Otis Pickett, University Historian, Clemson University
  • Mari Noorai, Curator of Education and Interpretation at Historic Properties, Clemson University

This hands-on workshop will introduce participants to different archival sources used to document the history of Woodland Cemetery and the African American Burial Ground at Clemson, including institutional records, maps, photographs, and archaeological artifacts.


1:30pm - 2:45pm
Scrolling in their Graves: Finding Your Ancestors in the Internet Era
Brackett Hall, Room 212
  • Josh Johnson, Site Coordinator, Agricultural Museum of South Carolina, Pendleton, SC

This workshop will offer tips and tricks to both beginning and advanced genealogists, navigating building a family tree, and finding those ancestors who just don't want to be found. Participants are encouraged to bring a laptop to this workshop.



3:00pm - 4:30pm

Workshop Session 3

The Cemetery as Text: Using Historic Cemeteries to Teach History, Public Engagement, and Service-Learning
Brackett Hall, Room 212
  • Dr. Mandi Barnard, Research Historian, Woodland Cemetery and African American Burial Ground Historic Preservation Project at Clemson University
  • Dr. Sara Collini, Postdoctoral Fellow in University History, Woodland Cemetery and African American Burial Ground Historic Preservation Project at Clemson University
  • Marquise Drayton, Community Engagement Assistant, Woodland Cemetery and African American Burial Ground Historic Preservation Project at Clemson University
  • Sarah Richardson, PhD Candidate in Rhetorics, Communication, and Information Design and Graduate Teacher of Record in the English Department at Clemson University

This workshop covers different teaching methods to engage undergraduate students with historic cemeteries, using the Woodland Cemetery and African American Burial Ground at Clemson as a case study. It will include discussion of primary sources and introducing students to archival research, digital storytelling, community engagement and public history tours, and service-learning projects.


4:30pm - 6:15pm | Dinner Break

Enjoy dinner on your own and with fellow symposium participants. The Hendrix Center has several options. Explore this campus dining map for more information.


6:30pm | Self Auditorium, Strom Thurmond Institute Building (lower level)

Keynote Address
Whispers from the Waters: The Ancestral Voices of the TransOceanic "Slave" Trade

Kamau Sadiki, Board Member and Lead Instructor, Diving With a Purpose

This presentation will discuss the underwater archaeology of shipwreck sites of ships involved in the transoceanic raid, trade, and enslavement of Black bodies during the 18th and 19th centuries. How should these Black bodies be remembered? These shipwreck sites are considered sacred, but the thousands of lives lost have not been appropriately acknowledged nor memorialized.

Diving with a Purpose (DWP) is a 501c3 organization dedicated to the conservation and protection of submerged heritage resources by providing education, training, certification and field experience to adults and youth in the fields of maritime archaeology and ocean conservation. Our special focus is the protection, documentation and interpretation of African slave trade shipwrecks and the maritime history and culture of African Americans who formed a core of labor and expertise for America's maritime enterprises.


7:30pm

Opening Reception

Day Two - Tuesday, October 25


8:00am - 3:00pm | Registration
McKissick Theater Registration Space, Hendrix Center, 1st floor

8:00am - 8:30am | Continental Breakfast
Hendrix Center, David Peebles Room (2nd floor)

8:30am - 9:45am

Session 1 Panels

Found but Not Forgotten: The Sugar Land 95 Roundtable Discussion
Hendrix Center, Meeting Room A
  • The Discovery, Exhumation, and Analysis of the Bullhead Convict Labor Camp, Fort Bend County Texas
    Chassidy Olainu-Alade, Fort Bend ISD
  • The Unsweet History of a Sugar Town in Texas – Post-Emancipation Forced Labor Camps and Convict Leasing
    Dr. Theresa Jach, Houston Community College - Northwest
    Dr. Helen Graham, Houston Community College
  • Advancing Education, Awareness and Outreach for the Sugar Land 95
    Chassidy Olainu-Alade, Fort Bend ISD
    Dr. Theresa Jach, Houston Community College - Northwest
    Dr. Helen Graham, Houston Community College
  • Sugar Land 95 Memorialization Project
    Chassidy Olainu-Alade, Fort Bend ISD
    Breeze Outlaw, MASS Design Group

Places of Final Rest: Restoring Hallowed Histories through Mapping, Community Engagement, and Archaeology
Hendrix Center, Meeting Room B
  • Moderator: Dr. Otis Pickett, Clemson University
  • Mapping Charleston’s Black Burial Grounds
    Anna-Catherine Carroll, Preservation Society of Charleston
  • From Lifeways and Contributions to Final Resting Place: Advancing the Narrative of the Enslaved through Fieldwork, Descendant Engagement, and Cemetery Accessibility at Historic Brattonsville (Co-authored by Dr. J. Christopher Gillam at Winthrop University, Carey Tilley at Historic Brattonsville, and Dr. Richard J. Chacon at Winthrop University)
    Dr. J. Christopher Gillam, Winthrop University
9:45am - 10:00am | Refreshment Break
10:00am - 11:15am

Session 2 Panels

Beyond the Classroom: Studying Campus, Local, and Global Histories through Cemeteries
Hendrix Center, Meeting Room A
  • Moderator: Dr. Joshua Catalano, Clemson University
  • Applying Global Questions of Equity in Local Spaces: Georgia Tech Students Study Oakland Cemetery
    Dr. Carla Gerona, Georgia Tech
    Alejandra Ruiz-León, Georgia Tech
  • “Put ‘Em in the Dirt”: College Football’s Fascination with Deadly Traditions and the Truth Behind who is Left Behind without Burial Rites
    Marquise Drayton, Clemson University

Preserving Black History at Red Hill Cemetery
Hendrix Center, Meeting Room B
  • Moderator: Dr. David Sheffler, University of North Florida
  • Red Hill Cemetery as Archive: Preserving Black History Through Memory and Space
    Dr. Felicia Bevel, University of North Florida
  • (Re-)Marking the Unmarked: Ground-Penetrating Radar at Red Hill Cemetery
    Kelley Melendez, University of North Florida
    Dr. Gordon Rakita, University of North Florida
  • Interpreting Red Hill Cemetery: Memorialization and Marginalization of Black World War I Veterans
    Amarilys Sánches, University of North Florida
11:15am - 11:30am | Refreshment Break
11:30am - 12:45pm

Session 3 Panels

Honoring Those Past: Documenting and Memorializing Burials
Hendrix Center, Meeting Room A
  • Moderator: Nicole Welch, Clemson University
  • Listening to the Ancestors: How Hurricane Irma Launched an Investigation that Stretches from a Fishing Village to a Gullah Cemetery (Co-authored by Jodi A. Barnes, Jamie Dozier, Gillian Richards-Greaves, Kalina Kassadjikova, Katherine Parker, and Bill Stevens)
    Dr. Jodi A. Barnes, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources
  • Reconciling a Contested Past: The Politics of Memorializing the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys and Boot Hill Cemetery
    Dr. Kaniqua L. Robinson, Furman University
  • Restless Death: Preserving Chattanooga Cemeteries and their Stories
    Stefanie M. Haire, Middle Tennessee State University

Cemetery Spaces: Narratives of Healing, Memorialization, and Access
Hendrix Center, Meeting Room B
  • Moderator: Sarah Richardson, Clemson University
  • Healing Cemeteries: Seeking Shelter Among the Dead, To Learn About Ourselves
    Dr. Michelangelo Giampaoli, DePaul University
  • “The Sacred Spot,” Memorializing and Historicizing the Jewish Past in Poland through the Cemetery
    Alison B. Curry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • The Grave of Marie Laveau
    Shelby Robert, Southern New Hampshire University and Liberty University

12:45pm - 2:00pm | Lunch Break

Enjoy lunch on your own and connect with fellow symposium participants. The Hendrix Center has several options. Explore this campus dining map for more options.

2:00pm - 3:15pm

Session 4 Panels

Engaging Descendants in Black Genealogy at Oakwood Cemetery
Hendrix Center, Meeting Room A
  • Moderator: Jennifer Chenoweth, City of Austin
  • Greg Farrar, Descendant
  • Jourdan Brunson, kinkofa
  • Tameshia Rudd-Ridge, kinkofa

Recovering, Memorializing, and Reframing Forgotten Burial Grounds
Hendrix Center, Meeting Room B
  • Moderator: Marissa Davis, Clemson University
  • One Gravestone…One Powerful Narrative: Watt, A Legacy Carved in Stone
    Kenya L. Lane, South Carolina Department of Archives and History
  • Uncovering the Cemetery at McLeod Plantation
    Rev. Toby Smith, McLeod Plantation Historic Site in Charleston, South Carolina
  • Recovering the Multi-Layered Histories of Cemetery Hill at Clemson
    Dr. Sara Collini, Clemson University
    Alexis Thomas, Clemson University
    Creative Inquiry Team
3:15pm - 3:30pm | Refreshment Break
3:30pm - 4:45pm

Session 5 Panels

Researching and Recovering Sacred Histories: Ritual, Identity, and the Archive
Hendrix Center, Meeting Room A
  • Moderator: Marjorie Campbell, Clemson University
  • A Screech Owl Screechin’: The Sacred Rituals and Burial Sites of Enslaved People in Lowcountry Georgia
    Taylor R. Watson, Georgia State University
  • No Longer Unknown: Recovering Lost Identities in St. Augustine National Cemetery
    Dr. Amy Larner Giroux, University of Central Florida
  • Searching for African American History in Clemson’s University Archive: Woodland Cemetery and African American Burial Ground
    Dr. Mandi Barnard, Clemson University

Local Community Activism: Collaborative Partnerships that Document Historic Cemeteries
Hendrix Center, Meeting Room B
  • Moderator: Mari Noorai, Clemson University
  • Just Remember Death is not the End: A Collaboration between the NC Department of Transportation and the NC Office of State Archaeology to Document Historic Period Cemeteries
    Melissa Timo, North Carolina Office of State Archaeology
    Paul J. Mohler, North Carolina Department of Transportation
  • Bethel Historic Cemetery Project: A Girl Scout-led Collaboration in Simpsonville, SC
    Tracy Graham, Girl Scout Troop 1967 Leader
    Gabrielle Graham, Girl Scout
    Emma Kate Brooks, Girl Scout
  • Creating Multi-faceted, Collaborative Community-Building Initiatives for the Woodland Cemetery and African American Burial Ground Project at Clemson University
    Dr. Rhondda Robinson Thomas, Clemson University

4:45pm - 6:00pm

Closing Reception

The Woodland Cemetery and African American Burial Ground Historic Preservation Project
The Woodland Cemetery and African American Burial Ground Historic Preservation Project | The cemetery is located on Woodland Drive at the intersection of Williamson Road and S. Palmetto Boulevard on the Clemson University campus. The team's offices are located in Suite 220 in Sirrine Hall.