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College of Behavioral, Social and Health Sciences

Faculty and Staff Profile

Kyle McLean

Assistant Professor


Office: Brackett 139

Phone: (864) 656-3238

Email: kdmclea@clemson.edu

Vita: View
 

Educational Background

Ph.D. Criminology & Criminal Justice
University of South Carolina 2018

M.A. Criminology & Criminal Justice
University of South Carolina 2014

B.S. Criminal Justice
Appalachian State University 2012

Courses Taught

JUST 2880 - The Criminal Justice System
JUST 4910 - Policing

Profile

Dr. McLean graduated from the University of South Carolina with a Ph.D. in Criminology and Criminal Justice in 2018. He then spent two years as an assistant professor at Florida State University. During this time he was named a National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Law Enforcement Advancing Data and Sciences (LEADS) Academic. Through this role, Dr. McLean works with law enforcement officers across the country to assess and recommend evidence-based practices for police departments. Dr. McLean is currently working with colleagues on an NIJ-funded study of police officer decision-making using virtual simulator technology.

Research Interests

Dr. McLean's research interests focus on understanding police-community relations and evaluating efforts to reform the police to better reflect community demands of policing. Accordingly, Dr. McLean has conducted research in the areas of police legitimacy, police training, police culture, police use of force, and body-worn cameras.

Research Publications

Selected recent works:

McLean, Kyle & Justin Nix. 2021. Understanding the bounds of legitimacy: Weber’s facets of legitimacy and the police empowerment hypothesis. Justice Quarterly. DOI: 10.1080/07418825.2021.1933141

Stogner, John, Bryan Lee Miller, & Kyle McLean. 2020. Police stress, mental health, and resiliency during the COVID-19 pandemic. American Journal of Criminal Justice. DOI: 10.1007/s12103-020-09548-y.

McLean, Kyle, Scott E. Wolfe, Jeff Rojek, Geoffrey P. Alpert, & Michael R. Smith. 2020. A randomized-controlled trial of social interaction police training. Criminology & Public Policy. DOI: 10.1111/1745-9133.12506.

McLean, Kyle. 2019. Justice-restoring responses: A theoretical framework for understanding citizen complaints against the police. Policing & Society. DOI: 10.1080/10439463.2019.1704755.

McLean, Kyle, Scott E. Wolfe, Jeff Rojek, Geoffrey P. Alpert, & Michael R. Smith. 2019. Police officers as warriors or guardians: Empirical reality or intriguing rhetoric? Justice Quarterly. DOI: 10.1080/07418825.2018.1533031.


College of Behavioral, Social and Health Sciences
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