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Faculty and Staff Profile

Jorge Luis Garci­a

Assistant Professor


Office: 309-C Wilbur O. and Ann Powers Hall
Phone: 864-650-6201
Email: JLGARCI@clemson.edu
Vita: https://www.dropbox.com/s/6zxx2pfsdlimfbn/garcia_cv.pdf?dl=0
Personal Website: http://www.jorgeluisgarcia.com/
 

 Educational Background

Ph.D.
The University of Chicago 2018

M.A.
The University of Chicago 2012

B.A.
CIDE 2010

 Courses Taught

Economics 411-611: Econ of Education (undergraduate and MA)
Economics 900-02: First-Year Econometrics for Econ PhD Part 1
Economics 900-03: First-Year Econometrics for Econ PhD Part 2

 Profile

I am a labor and development economist who studies fertility, human capital, and female labor force participation choices. I explore how these choices' market and policy environments cause socio-economic inequality, especially for women in developing countries and poor women in the US. In developing countries, female disadvantage originates early in life and persists throughout the life-cycle. Parents often selectively abort to have boys instead of girls; they invest more in sons than daughters. Women are often expected to have children in early adulthood and devote their lives to raising them; their families usually prefer them not to work. I study the economic fundamentals that cause fertility and employment policies to perpetuate female life-cycle disadvantage in developing countries. Female disadvantage also originates early in the life cycle in the US. In poor households, fathers are more likely to stay in a family when they have sons than when they have daughters. The high rate of single motherhood among the poor restricts child investment. I explore how early education mitigates the inequality generated by this resource-scarcity. My research combines administrative, archival, and survey data and employs modern microeconometric methods to identify causal effects; it uses economic models to understand the fundamentals driving causal effects. I teach the first two modules of the first-year econometrics sequence in the Econ Ph.D program. The first module focuses on estimation and inference in the linear-regression context. The second module focuses on identification and empirical research design. I also teach a class on the economics of education for undergraduate and master’s students.

 Research Interests

Labor
Development

 Research Publications

Early Childhood Education and Life-cycle Health (with James J. Heckman) 2020. Health Economics.

Quantifying the Life-cycle Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program (with James J. Heckman, Duncan Ermini Leaf, María José Prados) 2020. Journal of Political Economy 128:7.

Early Childhood Education and Crime (with James J. Heckman and Anna L. Ziff) 2019. Infant Mental Health Journal 40:1.

Gender Differences in the Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program (with James J. Heckman and Anna L. Ziff)2018. European Economic Review 109.

The Price of Fringe Benefits when Formal and Informal Labor Markets Coexist (with David Argente) 2015. IZA Journal of Labor Economics 3:14.

Why Do Formal Credit, Informal Credit, and both Types of Credits Coexist as Consumer Choices? (with Víctor Carreón and Sonia Di Giannatale) 2015. Economics Bulletin 35:1.

 Links

Google Scholar profile