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About

Contact Information

P: 864-656-2328
E: biolsci@clemson.edu

Campus Location

132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634

Hours

Monday - Friday:
8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Profile


Profile Photo

David Feliciano

Biological Sciences

Associate Professor

dfelici@clemson.edu

Educational Background

Postdoctoral Fellow, Neurosurgery, Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University, 2013
Ph.D., Pharmacology, State University of New York at Buffalo, 2008
B.S., Biochemical Pharmacology, State University of New York at Buffalo, 2003

Research Interests

The Feliciano lab translates fundamental biological knowledge about the brain into clinically relevant ideas. They achieve this by studying gene mutations that alter brain architecture. Many of these mutations effect small populations of people throughout the world. But because the genes are known, scientific approaches can be taken to perform loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments. The laboratory achieves these goals by studying brain cells, including stem cells, neurons, and astrocytes in culture. Arguably more important is that they can also perform these manipulations in vivo in living animals. These genetic alterations are then coupled with state-of-the art imaging and next generation RNA sequencing technologies to reveal the underlying molecular pathways and cellular physiology that are consequently altered by these changes. Many of the common neurological diseases that effect society have no known etiology but by studying rare disorders with known gene mutations, much of what is learnt can be applied to these other diseases. Diseases studied include neurodevelopmental disorders with high rates of comorbidity with epilepsy, intellectual delay, autism, and a predisposition to nervous system tumors.

Courses Taught

Graduate: Seminar Series
Neurobiology of Disease
Neurobiology
Cell Biology
Senior Seminar

Selected Publications

The Neurodevelopmental Pathogenesis of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex
Frontiers in Neuroanatomy Feliciano, DM
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnana.2020.00039/abstract

A transgenic inducible GFP extracellular-vesicle reporter (TIGER) mouse illuminates neonatal cortical astrocytes as a source of immunomodulatory extracellular vesicles. Neckles VN, Morton MC, Holmberg JC, Sokolov AM, Liu D, Nottoli T, Feliciano DM  Scientific Reports https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-39679-0

Neonatal Subventricular Zone Neural Stem Cells Release Extracellular Vesicles that Act as a Microglial Morphogen. 
Mary C. Morton, Victoria N. Neckles, Caitlin M. Seluzicki, Jennie C. Holmberg, David M. Feliciano Cell Reports, Apr 3 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2018.03.037

Noncanonical Sites of Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Brain.
Feliciano D. M., Bordey, A., and Bonfanti  L. Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in biology 7, a018846

Newborn cortical neurons: only for neonates?
Feliciano, D. M., and Bordey, A. Trends in neurosciences 36, 51-61

Selected Talks

Boston Children's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, How the Neonatal Subventricular Zone Relates to Neurodevelopmental Disorders

C.S. Mott Center for Human Growth and Development, NIH Pregnancy and Perinatology Branch (PPB of NICHD), Extracellular Vesicles Regulate the Neonatal Neuro-immune Axis

A Tor of the Developing Brain South Carolina Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders (SCAND) Research Symposium

Cold Spring Harbor Asia, “Biology of Extracellular Vesicles”, Suzhou, China

University of South Carolina, Department of Biology, “A Neural Stem Cell-Extracellular Vesicle-Microglia Axis”

University of Georgia, Neuroscience Program, “A Neural Stem Cell-Extracellular Vesicle-Microglia Axis”

Michigan State University (MSU), Department of Pediatrics, College Human Medicine, Invited Talk titled “Identifying Mechanisms and Therapeutic Approaches for Tuberous Sclerosis Complex and mTOR-Dependent Neurodevelopmental Disorders”

University of Georgia at Athens (UGA), Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, mTOR Regulation and Cortical Development

Allen Brain Institute: Evolution of Cerebrocortical Development

University of New England: Pharmacologically Resistant Epilepsy: Lessons Learned from Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

Des Moines University: Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Fetal Brain Development and What we can Learn from Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Mouse Models and Mechanisms. Yale Department of Physiology

Single-cell knockout of Tsc1 in utero generates cortical tuber-like lesions and heterotopic nodules with cytomegalic neurons. Yale Club Neurobiology

Neonatal subventricular zone neural stem cells release extracellular vesicles that function as a non-canonical microglial morphogen. Society for Neuroscience Postnatal Neurogenesis and Stem Cell Functions

Neurovesicles in Brain Development Southeastern Regional Developmental Biology Meeting

A neurodevelopmental regulator of the mtor pathway Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting

A neurodevelopmental regulator of the mtor pathway Society for Developmental Biology Southeast Regional Meeting

Single-cell knockout of Tsc1 in utero generates cortical tuber-like lesions and heterotopic nodules with cytomegalic neurons. 2010 Society for Neuroscience

Honors and Awards

2009 Herbert Schuel Commemorative Award

2009 Epilepsy Foundation Fellowship

2010 Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA)

2010 NIH LRP Pediatric Research

2012 Yale Cellular and Molecular Physiology, 1st Place Research,

2012 Vicky H. Whittemore Award, International TSC Research Conference

2015 Whitehall Foundation Research Award

Links

Neural Stem Cell-Microglia News
Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Grant
Tuberous Sclerosis Complex News
Exosome News
TIGER MOUSE

Contact Information

P: 864-656-2328
E: biolsci@clemson.edu

Campus Location

132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634

Hours

Monday - Friday:
8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.