Presentation Contest

Presentation Contest - Jr. Level

Presentation Contest

Speaking in public is a skill that can help you throughout your lifetime. You can probably think of famous people that were known for their speaking ability such as Abraham Lincoln, John F. Kennedy, and Martin Luther King. They were able to accomplish great things because they had an important message and had the skills needed to deliver that message. You can become a good speaker, too! With the help of your leaders, teachers, and parents, you can learn to give a visual presentation.

For more details and links to upload your presentation, please click on the following link - Link to regional presentation contests

Visual presentations teach, entertain, inform, or persuade. There are several types including a demonstration, illustrated talk, or team presentation.

  • A demonstration teaches how to do or make something as the presenter shows and explains each step of a process. A finished example of what has been demonstrated should be displayed at the end of a demonstration.
  • An illustrated talk explains a topic using models, posters, or charts. A finished example is not required.
  • A team presentation is given by two presenters. Each presenter should participate equally.

The Presentation Contests take place every spring at Jr. and Sr. Weekends. If you are interested in participating, please contact your County 4-H Agent for more details and information. This year, we will have Regional Presentation Contests.  Please click on the following link for more information. Link to Regional Presentation Contests.

First, decide what you want to talk about. That may seem pretty simple, but it may be the hardest part. Choose a topic that shows your interests and passions. Think about the following:

  • Unusual experiences that you have had such as organizing a conference for teens, a community service experience, or your job
  • Hobbies that you love
  • Subjects that are important to you-recycling, cleaning up your neighborhood, or caring for your animal

Download and print a copy of the General Rules for 2022

Looking for ideas for topics - check out the attached page on topics


Where Can I Find Information on My Topic?

Leaders, teachers, libraries, and the Internet are all sources. Make sure your sources are reliable. Information from the Cooperative Extension Service is research-based and reliable.  

  • What type of equipment should I use?
    The type of equipment you use depends on the type of presentation you are going to give. Some things to keep in mind:
    • Use equipment suitable for the job and the age of the presenter
    • Clear glass bowls are best for food demonstrations for visibility
    • Have towels available for spills
    • Cover the table if you are using it
    • Remember to test your equipment before you begin your presentation
  • How should I set up my work area?
    It is important that you arrange your area so that your audience can see what you are doing at all times. A neat, clean workspace will help you find your materials more easily. Setting up your materials in order will help you remember what comes next in your presentation. Take the time you need before you begin your presentation to set up your work area the way you need it.
  • When should I use a poster?
    Posters are used to help the audience understand your topic. They are used to illustrate your presentation and to help your audience understand important information or steps in a process. It is important that your posters be well done and that they do not distract from your presentation. Limit the amount of information and visuals you put on one poster; less is better. Make sure all lettering is large, neat, and dark enough to be read from the back of the room. Title posters are also helpful.
  • What should I wear?
    Think about your topic and dress appropriately. For example, if you are preparing food, you could wear an apron, or if you are talking about an animal, you could wear showmanship clothes. Remember that you want people to focus on your presentation, so try to eliminate possible distractions by keeping hair off your face (you may want to tie back long hair) and avoid wearing a lot of jewelry. Remember that people often form a first impression based on appearance so make sure that your clothes are neat, clean, and well-fitting.
  • What if I get nervous?
    Being nervous is not all bad; it can actually help you make a good presentation. Good speakers use their nervous energy to make their presentations more exciting. So, take a few deep breaths and begin your presentation. The nervousness is usually at its worst before you actually start. Once you begin your presentation it usually gets better! Make sure that you are well prepared, and you’ll have nothing to worry about. Speaking in front of an audience is stressful for many people. However, if you want to be a leader or achieve success this is a communication skill that will pay huge dividends throughout your life. Here are some tips to help you feel more confident.
    • Pick a topic you love to talk about.
    • Begin your speech with a smile.
    • Make eye contact with the audience.
    • Stand tall. Good posture helps open your lungs so you can breathe.
    • Show enthusiasm.
    • Talk directly to the audience in a clear, conversational tone.
    • If you make a mistake, go right on with your speech. The audience may not even notice. Remember, only you know what you planned to say.
    • Act and look like you enjoy doing your speech.
    • Keep notes available and organized. Don’t read from them. Speak from being well prepared.
    • Relax your body. Practice deep breathing and relax your arms, shoulders, and hands.
    • Relax your voice. Hum up and down a familiar song.
    • Practice! Speak in front of family and friends. Use a video camera. Critique yourself. Ask others for feedback. Prepare
  • Pro Pointers
    Practice, practice, practice! This is the most important part!
    o Practice listening to your voice (To really listen to your voice, cup your right hand around your right ear and gently pull the ear forward. Next, cup your left hand around your mouth and direct the sound straight into your ear. Practice changing the tone and pitch of your voice)
    o Practice again. Speak S L O W L Y and C L E A R L Y
    o Practice again using your visual aids
    o Practice again listening to your voice and using your visual aids
    o Practice again making good eye contact and smiling
    o Practice again using “natural” gestures and body movements
    o Practice again while someone scores you
  • Additional Pointers
    • Make sure you know your material
    • Make a list of all the equipment you need, check all equipment to make sure it works, and pack your list with your equipment
    • Pack paper towels
    • Cover or remove brand names
    • Arrange posters so that you can work them from rear to front
    • Number posters on the backside: 1/5, 2/5, 3/5, etc.
    • Bring back-up of electronic presentations
    • Dress for your presentation topic
    • Shirttails in and pants pulled up
    • Hair and nails clean
    • Hair pulled away from face (tied back if handling food)
    • Stand straight and tall so that your voice will project and so that you will look confident
    • Never turn your back away from your audience
    • Make sure the audience/judge can see everything

Download and print a copy of the General Rules for 2022

Looking for ideas for topics - check out the attached page on topics